Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,160 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Zero Dark Thirty
Lowest review score: 0 Porky's
Score distribution:
5,160 movie reviews
  1. Avalanches are nothing compared to the deadening touch of the stereotyping and audience-insulting simplicities in the scenic but brain-dead Vertical Limit.
  2. Causes one to wish... that movies about the supernatural could make contact with supernatural script doctors.
    • Boston Globe
  3. Maudlin script mars teen love.
    • Boston Globe
  4. It is Kevin Pollak who steals what there is of a show as Jamal's passive-aggressive, pressure-cooked agent. His comedic timing, particularly given the thinness of the script, is the only genuinely impressive slam dunk this movie has to offer.
  5. A sodden-looking film.
    • Boston Globe
  6. Trips early and never gets up off the floor.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Sorvino can't pass for a man, but that's beyond the point in this rarefied situation. She's beautiful and she can usually act, but here the only convincing thing she projects is fatigue from running around the garden all day.
  7. Harmless, if witless, stuff for the kids.
    • Boston Globe
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    She's like Bob Hope with fake breasts and a wig. Now, that's scary.
  8. Mostly a screenful of nothingness.
  9. Larceny at its most labored.
    • Boston Globe
    • 23 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    It would have done better to go straight to video, where it belongs.
  10. Tawdry, trashy yawn-fest that makes the viewer long for the days when bad girls were dangerous dames with sultry style.
    • Boston Globe
  11. Awful in ways that are just clever enough often enough to make it intermittently watchable.
  12. Stumbles over its own clumsiness until it goes down for the count.
  13. The images are pretty, and Gene Quintano's screenplay gets everybody from point A to point B, though with no discernible knack for wit or subtlety.
    • Boston Globe
  14. The problem in The One isn't the black holes in the universe, to which the characters refer at periodic intervals, but the black hole on the screen. The One is a zero.
    • Boston Globe
  15. It plays like a pilot for what I imagine will be network TV's first all-gay sitcom.
  16. A fatally insubstantial film.
    • Boston Globe
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    If you are a devotee of sleaze, you'll salivate at the prospect of Mau Mau Sex Sex, a fond and fawning look back at exploitation, or grindhouse, movies from the 1930s through the 1960s.
  17. It seems endless. It's also unusually crude and stupid, even for an Arnold Schwarzenegger movie.
  18. Takes a vacation from quality.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    It was possible to hope that Blade II would turn out to be good. Well, forget it.
  19. A lot of striking pictures in this would-be feminist "Braveheart," but a film that's pretty flat and earthbound because of the limitations of the figure at its center.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Bacon makes an appropriately detestable villain; unfortunately, he's the most interesting character here. As for Love, well, this puts her one career rung closer to ''Hollywood Squares.''
  20. Writer and director Tim Disney raises a provocative point about how radical and inconvenient true faith can be.
    • Boston Globe
  21. Starts by cheating death and ends by cheating us.
  22. A lame little flat liner.
  23. Even allowing for differences in national styles, Kikujiro sprawls and stumbles. It's a road movie that turns into its own detour.
  24. Isn't going to be a contender
  25. Strenuously as it tries, and pulse-poundingly successful as the embassy rescue scene is, Rules of Engagement never engages us.
  26. What the Hughes brothers have come up with is, to borrow another phrase from that bygone age, a penny dreadful.
    • Boston Globe
  27. Such an utter piece of fluff so conceptually barren it might as well be a music video.
    • Boston Globe
  28. It's hard to believe anyone would think importing a French comedy was a good idea.
    • Boston Globe
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Sure, go ahead and take the kids. But, for pity's sake, read them the book first.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Abandon is this CLOSE to being good, juicy, bad-movie fun.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's coherent, well shot, and tartly acted, but it wears you down like a dinner guest showing off his doctorate.
  29. Blurs the line between black comedy and black hole.
    • Boston Globe
  30. Comes off more like a series of painful cliches than a comedy or a love story.
    • Boston Globe
  31. It's a lame and painfully overextended satire of homophobia.
    • Boston Globe
  32. Consumerism is running more amok than ever, but this satire of it isn't.
  33. Sitting through it is like waking up on Christmas morning to find a stockingful of styrofoam.
    • Boston Globe
  34. The average Bollywood routine is passionately cheesy. This movie seems cursed with a lactose intolerance.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The feel-bad movie of the summer.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Indeed a rip-off - a rehash of Hong Kong superstar Chow's greatest celluloid moments with an overlay of Hollywood action cliches, youth-flick silliness, and ah-so stereotypes.
  35. See Spot Run isn't solely responsible for the dumbing down of movies, but it's part of the dismal phenomenon.
    • Boston Globe
  36. For all the controversy surrounding Buffalo Soldiers, you'd think the film would at least be interesting.
  37. It plays better as exasperating comedy than genuine horror -- although there is something terrifying about being stuck in a movie whose idea of a bogeyman is a scarecrow with an eating disorder.
  38. Full of atmosphere and visuals, it's empty of anything that really matters.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Juggles so many stories and characters, nothing ever develops into more than a rough sketch.
  39. Meretricious without being entertaining, it's an easy game -- and an easier film -- to sit out.
    • Boston Globe
  40. Sadly unworthy of Douglas.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The ugly duckling of Nickelodeon's after-bath lineup. That's its strength.
  41. The movie's comic powers are often marred by silliness and stereotypes. Pootie tanks.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Harmless in the extreme and it'll mute your kids for nearly 80 minutes, but why not just treat the little yard apes to the real deal and take them to ''Spirited Away''?
  42. So heavy and lifeless that you keep waiting for those three little front-row kibitzers from "Mystery Science Theatre 3000" to appear at the bottom of the screen to start goofing on it.
    • Boston Globe
  43. You couldn't ask for a better setting for a horror movie. What you could ask for is a better script.
    • Boston Globe
  44. The biggest problem, ironically, is that even though the plot and the action center on smoking pot, it's not enough of a stoner flick. The concept of getting stoned isn't amusing; watching stoned people is.
    • Boston Globe
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A pleasant, thin, hammerlocked movie about the pleasures of breaking free - it's the Cliff Notes version of anarchic classics like ''Bringing Up Baby'' or ''What's Up, Doc?'' Should you want to take the graduate course, you'll find those films at your video store.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Perhaps the biggest disappointment is that The In-Laws was directed by Andrew Fleming, who delivered the fizzy Nixon-era comedy ''Dick'' a few years back and who also had a hand in ''Grosse Pointe,'' the wicked, briefly-lived WB parody of TV teen dramas. The man obviously knows from satire, but not on the evidence of anything here.
  45. The most dispiriting thing about Anger Management is that its cameos seem like leftovers.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Shamelessly exploits the horror of domestic violence for melodramatic, cheap thrills.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    A desperate, cynical self-parody.
    • Boston Globe
  46. Offers little in the way of pleasure, even to its target audience -- the easily pleased and undemanding.
  47. The sex bits are flat, the racial innuendo is flatter, and somewhere, Cosby is having a Pudding Pop and shaking his head in disbelief.
  48. Isn't as funny as it is crude, and isn't as crude as it is labored.
    • Boston Globe
  49. The lack of sexual tension is astounding.
  50. The tame, confused script eventually sinks the film, although Field shows skill directing actors.
    • Boston Globe
  51. Crude, lewd comedy that makes ''Animal House'' seem wholesome.
  52. It's "Beach Blanket Bingo" revisited, but with a Eurocast and more exotic locations.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    The music and the stars aren't enough to save the movie.
  53. Falls flat on two fronts: It's neither deep and interesting enough to be a brainteaser nor sufficiently thrilling to count as a mindless diversion.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    A movie where the miracles -- and treacly moments -- keep topping each other.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    The best audiences can hope for is that they, too, get amnesia and forget they ever saw this movie.
  54. The screenplay, with its relentlessly schematic characters saying relentlessly schematic things, is so moronic that it makes you long for a documentary on the real Cape League.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A blandly filmed and subtext-heavy talkathon that wastes a game cast on a group of characters about whom it's almost impossible to care. If this were a cocktail party, you'd be back home with a good book already.
  55. Because Spun is so plotless it's almost avant-garde, we're meant to be delighted with its assortment of set pieces.
  56. It's two hours of slumming in a vision of hell hatched from bourgeois comfort. That, and not its unsavory subject matter, is what makes it bummer theater.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Del Toro does remind you of Brando here; unfortunately, it's the Brando of ''Apocalypse Now,'' the one with the green face and puffy line readings. Jones fares better, even if he wears the same grieving-for-humanity expression throughout the film.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Settles for the cliches of American suspense films, right down to an ending that leaves the door open to a possible sequel.
    • 13 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Prinze charming, but can't save movie.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What it is, distressingly, is a mess - a ragbag of promising ideas and failed narrative, of good acting and plain old bad filmmaking.
  57. It is all style and no substance.
    • Boston Globe
  58. The limp script actually has the characters spout ''Let's get outta here!'' more than once. Or maybe that's just a wise member of the audience talking.
  59. One could argue that ''Lock, Stock'' and Snatch are essentially the same movie - crime comedies marked by an outlandish visual style. Which raises the question of whether Ritchie has the range to do anything else.
    • Boston Globe
  60. Like the horror-flick hacks who infest Hollywood like termites, the Pangs don't build suspense, they assault the senses with twitchy photography and Danny's editing.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Pureed, predictable conflation of ''Alien'' and ''Titanic'' and ''The Shining.''
  61. Brilliantly named Half Past Dead -- or for Seagal pessimists: ''Totally Past His Prime.''
    • 28 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Reasonably painless if you've never seen a comedy about the travails of newlyweds.
  62. Never having decided whether it wants to be comedy or a sentimental hand-wringer, it tries to be both and winds up being neither.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Has the distinction of being much dumber and pulpier than the comic book on which it's based -- the ink practically comes off on your fingers as you watch it.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There are about 15 minutes of genuine, bust-a-gut comedy in Bringing Down the House, and, surprisingly, they belong to Steve Martin, who hasn't been funny on film in years.
  63. Noe's summation is an ideological sucker-punch from a filmmaker who gets off on abusive relationships. He may as well have thrown a big ''whatever'' up on the screen.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Equilibrium just happens to be a really bad comic book.
  64. May not emerge as the biggest disaster of the holiday movie season, if only because we haven't yet seen all the other year-end films. But it is a huge high-energy misfire, bringing Tom Cruise, Penelope Cruz, and Cameron Crowe to earth with a thud.
    • Boston Globe
  65. Dukakis gets off some of the film's best lines and keeps the worst from sinking the whole affair; Polley's role is limited, but her character's audition for a feminine hygiene commercial is by far the best thing here.
  66. The casting alone should warn you about what kind of bottom this movie's going to hit.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There are rich issues at play here, about the nature of attraction and whether individual will is or isn't pinned to the wheel of physiology. But Decena hasn't dramatized them; he's used them as talking points set to an indie-film guitar strum, and the result is both earnest and passionless.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It might even work if In the Cut was remotely convincing as a thriller, but Campion can't help wrinkling her nose at genre.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Gospel of John is to "The Passion of the Christ" as tap water is to parboiled sacramental wine.

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