Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,422 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Citizenfour
Lowest review score: 0 Bratz
Score distribution:
5,422 movie reviews
  1. Its pile-driving succession of set pieces comes at you with numbingly relentless efficiency, presumably in the hope that you won't notice or care how dumb it all is.
    • Boston Globe
  2. What saves it is that it's lighter than mousse and is animated by a handful of engaging performers.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There’s a thin line between the iconic and the generic, and The Rover, a grim post-apocalyptic drama from down under, wanders back and forth across it in an adrenaline daze.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Overall the concept is strong and expertly fleshed out; it's just a pity that Hollywood tropes are allowed to invade.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    But as good as it is, the film falls short of translating the exaltation and near-gospel music feel of the band in full flight. [2 Nov 1984]
    • Boston Globe
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Wonderful characters, these three, and The Hard Word never figures out what to do with them.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ghosts is better-than-average McConaughey swill, but not by much - that's its pleasure and its curse.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What a waste.
  3. 'Trainspotting'' Lite.
    • Boston Globe
  4. The problem is that the heart of the movie is McGowan. He's just not a very compelling figure. He's a bit doughy and inert.
  5. Despite the heavy-handedness, isn't awful enough to be a hilarious howler. But neither is it good enough to become the tropical noir it could have been.
    • Boston Globe
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Flatters its audience by dividing the grown-up world into mean idiots and nice idiots, which might be interestingly subversive if the movie had anything on its mind. Instead, it's just a Hollywood crash course: Heist Films 101.
  6. Lots of sex, but little joy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A comparison to Carver's original story - called "Why Don't You Dance?," easily Googleable, and all of 1,600 words long - is instructive.
  7. Will miracles never cease? Alas, they do. Pausing pregnantly between clauses to add to their trite profundity, Quentin recites the moral of the story, and it’s as phony as the towns of the title.
  8. If you walk in with your expectations at a suitably low setting, you won't walk away disappointed.
    • Boston Globe
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A tasty diversion from the usual Hollywood fare.
  9. Mostly, Smart People is a failure of imagination.
  10. Just because a Japanese animated film is screening at the Museum of Fine Arts doesn't mean that you can count on Miyazaki-caliber artistry.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Even at 85 minutes, the movie contains maybe 50 minutes that scare.
  11. There's something wrong with this picture, and the problem is there on Smith's face -- Smith looks distressingly I-was-an-Oscar-nominee bored. That goes double for Jones.
  12. The characters, in short, are never given enough dimension, enough chance to develop the individual tics and eccentricities on which this kind of comedy thrives.
    • Boston Globe
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Monogamy sets up a nifty idea that it doesn't follow through.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The bottom line: Any movie that gives Jonathan Winters work is doing something right.
  13. Waist Deep is a cynical excuse for the writer and director (and talented actor) Vondie Curtis-Hall to sock some money away for the kids' college tuition. It's as if he watched "Get Rich or Die Tryin' " and thought, "It needs more palm trees."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What it is is watchable, a thoroughly professional piece of Great Man hackwork that lacks the invention and spirit of its obvious model, "Shakespeare in Love.''
  14. All the movie's good style goes to waste on a not terribly compelling conceit and loosely sketched characters.
  15. It's the sort of movie that thinks cutting between two different stories makes it art. Usually, it feels like an exercise in art. There's a lot of calisthenics but very little beauty or truth or whatever it is the movie is going for.
  16. Canner is either overwhelmed by so much impressive access to so many alarming business opportunities or lacking the investigative rigor to drive home the moral problems of these drugs and the existential problems of these women.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Adding to the general air of ''What the hell?'' is Australian pop singer Natalie Imbruglia as Lorna, the beautiful superspy who falls for our hero. With Lorna's help, Johnny discovers that Sauvage is plotting to take over the British throne -- the Battle of Hastings wasn't good enough, it seems.
  17. Martin puts a thankless gloss on the antic role he played in "Parenthood." As his wife, Hunt is the movie's saving grace.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A sizable amount of national pride is on display in Ong-Bak.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a smart, provocative idea for a movie. I wish 9 Songs was that movie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The first hour of Magic Mike XXL is deadly.
  18. Likable performances are critically wounded by implausible scenarios and derivative-minded direction referencing everything from ''Reservoir Dogs'' to ''Fargo.''
  19. Instead of all-seeing, it’s more like seen it all before.
  20. The movie attempts to both explain everything away and pat itself (and Norway) on the back once we see Noa watching President Obama deliver his Nobel Prize speech.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Those who love police overkill, guns, jingoistic race-baiting, guns, macho smugness, and guns will be well served.
  21. This movie wants to cover every base without thinking very deeply about them. So while a lot of ground is covered in 80 brisk minutes, the information presented is only abstractly useful.
  22. It's not that the film is devoid of honestly earned laughs here and there. The problem is that there are too few of them and that the film can't connect them.
    • Boston Globe
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Ted Kotcheff's First Blood is a cute, slick anti-Vietnam war film carefully treated to go down for the pro-war constituency it's made for. [23 Oct 1982]
    • Boston Globe
  23. A mildly diverting gay-straight odd couple comedy that has just enough bright one-liners to carry it past its plot structuring.
    • Boston Globe
  24. Cop Out seems aptly named. It’s not personal. It’s barely even a movie. It’s a fire hydrant that the director and his stars use for exterior shots.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Glib, fast-paced entertainment that barely leaves a mark - which, given the subject, is just plain wrong.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    CQ
    Triumphs over its own trendiness only by being vapid and superficial.
  25. That the mushroom-dwelling blue creatures still manage to be endearing even in their second big-screen extravaganza (in 3-D, no less) is about the best that can be said of The Smurfs 2.
  26. It's too long and self-consciously progressive to be entertaining, but it's too well-intentioned to be dismissed altogether.
  27. I can't say why Coppola wanted to spend time with this man. It's like following someone on Twitter who fails to generate many compelling tweets.
  28. So light it should wind up on the ''diet" shelf of the video store.
  29. Everyone in this overstaffed showbiz sampler has been better somewhere else. An assortment of talented comedians, character actors, professional athletes, sports commentators, one rapper, and two former sitcom stars sit in this movie like too much food on a buffet cart.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Don't roll your eyes just yet. Step Up Revolution, enhanced by 3-D and set in glitzy Miami, is not as cringe-worthy as you would expect from the fourth "Step Up" installment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a charming disappointment that retains the elements that make the writer's novels so good without ever bending them into cinematic shape.
  30. Kim doesn't sweat interweaving his story threads in any tightly controlled way. Just when the need-for-speed stuff really starts to gain traction, he'll shift for a surprisingly lengthy stretch to comic relief with the deputies and local wacko Johnny Knoxville.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There is almost no drama, nor any surprise, in this long effort.
    • Boston Globe
  31. Sacrifice wants to have it both ways. It's willing neither to give itself up to the goofy sincerity of genre conventions nor to make the demands on viewers that serious drama requires. The sacrifices Chen's characters make would signify that much more if he'd made a sacrifice or two himself.
  32. The actors give it their best, Thomsen and Werlinder in particular.
  33. Finnish filmmaker Jalmari Helander's dark-comic expansion on his cult Internet shorts, in which he crafts a back story for Santa that's as black as stocking coal.
  34. In attempting to show us a love blind to class, culture, and color, she's (Chadha) also made it bland.
  35. The Words aspires to depths greater than the sex we never see these two have. There's nothing for the eye to do while the ear fills with the banalities of two streams of narration, one by Dennis Quaid, the other by Jeremy Irons, all of it built around a lie.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Everyone in the film is an uninteresting grotesque.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Life as We Know It gives bland and predictable a good name.
  36. Paltrow makes the part look natural. She's not impersonating an actual singer, so she seems merely like a twangy, alcoholic version of herself. She should be stopped from dancing in enormous arenas, but her thin voice is rather pretty.
  37. Jolie doesn't seem entirely bored with the routine. She has a laugh or two at her bionic image: Evelyn is a woman who uses a maxi pad as a bandage.
  38. Charming, but not seductive.
  39. Few comedians talk so much to get a laugh, and sometimes the strain shows... And the directors don’t do him any favors by the annoyingly frequent close-ups of audience members in convulsions of laughter.
  40. "Rear Window" never comes up in the Disturbia press notes, which is probably just as well since it steals that movie's premise but none of Alfred Hitchcock's wit, finesse, or seduction.
  41. The film is nothing to be ashamed of (especially if you're Kingsley). But it's as if everybody involved knows what the deal is.
  42. One wants to find enlightenment - or at least entertainment - in this reconsideration of Playboy and of Hefner. But it's tainted.
  43. This dog will inevitably let down purists looking for the elusive combination of smart and funny.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Where Bieber’s first concert documentary, 2011’s “Justin Bieber: Never Say Never,” chronicled his rise to fame, his new one is damage control.
  44. Gimme Shelter is sometimes moving and inspiring, but you have to wonder: Though Kathy and her movement give teenagers shelter, do they give them a life?
  45. For the most part, though, the film maintains its low ambitions; it is mostly inoffensive, only occasionally ludicrous, and at times, at least for me, genuinely moving.
  46. Blew its chance to be an epic drug opera. It's only nostril-deep.
    • Boston Globe
  47. Ford and Pfeiffer deliver craftsmanlike work, but the film steadily unravels as Zemeckis tries to ratchet up the suspense.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie isn't THAT bad -- it's just made-for-TV historical treacle that has somehow found its way to the big screen (and barely that; if you want to be moved or outraged by the film, you'll have to travel to Danvers or Revere).
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Writer Peter Harness has based his screenplay on his own childhood experiences, but personal doesn't necessarily translate to fresh.
  48. The movie is generic and shallow in its glimpse of the love and sex lives of a handful of young New Yorkers.
  49. By Hollywood standards, a movie carried with such gusto by a 67-year-old woman has to be considered a miracle. And I'm not sorry to say I enjoyed watching her do it.
  50. Every minute of the film is trash, and director Carl Franklin seems to know it.
  51. This new movie is a more credible, less grisly act of filmmaking , but it's a less compelling exercise. It doesn't have the ruthless moral reasoning of the first two "Saw" pictures, however grotesque and specious that reasoning was. But it does have a plot that revolves around a ventriloquist and her demon doll.
  52. It’s a brutal bit of screen poetry that’s matched too infrequently by the aching human stories director Fedor Bondarchuk is so anxious to tell.
  53. Shadyac doesn't film how his change inspires more change, or showing him, say, starting a school for destitute orphans. All we see him give is this movie. It's not much of a contribution.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The director’s first real misfire, a meditation on love and lost paradise that starts with breathtaking assurance and slowly crumbles into self-parody.
  54. Neither the comedy nor the romance is strong enough in Immigration Tango to offer any improvement on Peter Weir's similar, and better, 1990 film "Green Card."
  55. This is a movie you could watch in your sleep.
  56. The movie is so chilly and fundamentally empty at its core that we're more or less on the outside looking in.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    That Prom plays as pleasantly and inoffensively as it does is due to the performances, particularly McDonell as the rebellious Jesse.
  57. Maybe my priorities are wrong, but this inquiring mind wants to know when these two will find a movie entirely worthy of his understatement and her naughtiness. This one has its moments, but it's also littered with action-flick junk.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Monster House is the first horror comedy made exclusively for fourth-graders.
  58. Violette demonstrates how suffering produces great art, and that the artist isn’t the only one who suffers for it.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As such things go, it’s not bad: slick and proficient, The Stepfather 2.0 gets the adrenaline pumping, but the original has the brains.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Buried under a mound of haunted house cliches is a creepier, more sophisticated movie about the sexual power of teenage girls, and their fathers’ inability to comprehend, clambering to get out.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    With Trance, story becomes just another element in Boyle’s commercial pop-Cubism, and the results are nearly fatal.
  59. Efficient, but in the end quite pedestrian.
    • Boston Globe
  60. It makes for a structurally glitchy inspirational exercise whose climax carries all the goosebump-making drama of a Pats preseason game.
  61. The film doesn't have enough innovation or pizazz to attract teenagers, and it lacks the novel charm that made ''Spy Kids'' a surprising winner with both adults and younger audiences.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Goldsman takes Helprin’s book — a work overflowing with events, ideas, characters, passions — and pounds away at it until all that’s left is mush.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The carnage is cartoonishly graphic, but the onlookers watching through binoculars from a nearby sandy bluff are impressed.
  62. Stabs at the dramatic don't amount to anything that makes us care, even for Bell, who has been solid on AMC's "The Walking Dead'' and in the chairlift chiller "Frozen.'' But genre fans who have been thirsting for gore via acupuncture needles or a LASIK machine should get their giddy fill.
  63. The movie is only sporadically interesting.

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