Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,905 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Original Kings of Comedy
Lowest review score: 0 Cocktail
Score distribution:
5905 movie reviews
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A formulaic script, a tired plot -- and uninspired dialogue all point up the real star. It's the house,
    • Boston Globe
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Invites us to both hate King David and admire his style, and there will probably be some hand-wringing about that.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What you might call conditional whimsy, predicated on the audience overlooking so many plot implausibilities that it might get tuckered out from all the charity.
  1. This is an old man's movie, without an old man's experience. Despite McGinly's stated affection for Kreskin (the movie ends with a written appreciation of him), there's nothing personal about it. It's the movie equivalent of handing us a business card.
  2. When the action is at its sharpest, such as with Henry’s mid-chase leap from a detonating truck onto the back of a motorcycle, it’s spectacular.
  3. The Meddler is a disappointment after the talent Scafaria demonstrated in her 2012 feature debut “Seeking a Friend for the End of the World.”
  4. Disappointing for a number of reasons. For one thing, it's silly. For another, it's not always silly enough to be diverting.
  5. It has the wild, rancid atmosphere of a garbage bag that a raccoon has ripped open.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    G
    If the movie's not as bad as it sounds, it's not all that great, either.
  6. Colorful as the 3-D aliens-among-us comedy is to look at, though, Corddry is handed a role that’s beige as can be, and so are his castmates.
  7. Muniz has better secret-agent toys to play with, funnier lines and sidekicks helping him out, and a bit more discerning director in Kevin Allen ("The Big Tease").
  8. Well-meant though it may be, the movie has an advertorial gloss.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It just plonks down the actress and a handful of stellar co-stars without much in the way of a script, storyline, or actual jokes. Yet you may still come out with a smile on your face. It’s very odd.
  9. Bait ends up seeming pretty wormy.
    • Boston Globe
  10. Never brings its potentially intriguing plot strands into focus.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Visually dazzling and dramatically trite -- it's virtuoso piffle.
  11. Like most of Hallström's Hollywood movies ("The Cider House Rules," "Chocolat"), this one is excruciatingly tasteful.
  12. An unremarkable comedy-drama.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film's case against overdevelopment needs to be, and could be, aggressive, airtight. It should play to the unconverted. Instead, The Unforeseen gives us . . . poetry.
  13. This movie is the height of by-the-book dullness.
  14. The movie partners all the cliches of the inner-city school drama with the cliches of the dance instructional, and the two keep stomping on each other's toes.
  15. Butler serves the cause well, considering. Think that cause is a thankless one? Shhh, don’t tell Secret Service agent Channing Tatum or president Jamie Foxx, headed your way in June with, yes, “White House Down.”
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The main, if not only, reason to see The Machinist is for Christian Bale's title performance, and even then you have to be a fan of hardcore martyrdom in the service of craft.
  16. Perry is a playwright, and his dialogue here is usually entertaining.
  17. The Sentinel isn't an entire season of ''24" smushed into a bland two hours of movie? Does Kiefer Sutherland know?
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The parts, in other words, promise a brilliant whole. So why is this movie one of the signal disappointments of the year? You have to go back to the basics: Public Enemies has everything going for it except a reason and a script.
  18. The movie moves predictably to its formulaic finale, which -- unwittingly perhaps -- reprises Plummer's own sugary classic, ''The Sound of Music.''
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Carell's performance is enjoyable but safe, and while he and Knightley play well enough together, there's no genuine chemistry - no zap to convince us these two deserve to be the last lovers on Earth.
  19. A so-so documentary about another fascinating, underreported piece of Harlem history.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Scoop is distinctly minor Allen, with less weight to it than one of his old humor doodles in The New Yorker.
  20. This is a movie whose cynicism in the name of idealism might have appealed to Billy Wilder.
  21. Written in wisps and watery double-entendres by Heather McGowan and Niels Mueller, and the movie is so benign that its proceedings are beside the point.
  22. The frustration, though, is how much the movie leans on made-ya-jump scares and contrived plot devices when its quieter chills and already fraught setups are so potent.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Fair Game takes one of the more shameful sub-chapters in modern US politics - and turns it into a strident, condescending Hollywood melodrama.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    With The Invention of Lying, the British comic actor Ricky Gervais has come up with a wickedly funny idea for a movie - and then purged the wickedness right out of it.
  23. The Silence is a victim of over-plotting, clunky narrative, gratuitous stylization, and too many points of view. When any character quirk or story turn shows promise, depend on some ill-considered directorial decision to put a stop to it.
  24. Lopez smiles, whines, and blinks her way through this movie. She seems more relaxed than she ever has. And yet it seems like she’s hiding in romantic comedies, lest we discover that she doesn’t have a “Monster’s Ball’’ or even a “Blind Side’’ in her.
  25. Are we really looking to Evil Dead for gnarly possessions played straight? That’s what Alvarez gives us for an overlong stretch, until his reinterpretation of the malevolent-hand gag kicks off a last act that’s more freewheelingly, twistedly grisly. (Don’t skip the credits, because the fan-energizing momentum peaks at the very end.)
  26. A sometimes clever but ultimately clichéd comedy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    At the end, under the closing credits, Freeheld shows us photos of the real Hester and Andree, and we sense an immediacy the rest of the film lacks. These are the people we want to watch and not a movie simulacra, no matter how capably performed and earnestly felt.
  27. Slickly directed by Joel Schumacher, who sees that each and every button in this unabashedly manipulative film is pushed hard, Falling Down could have been deeply disturbing if it weren't so cartoony, so determined to glibly escape the moral consequences of the vicarious white-rampage fantasies to which it caters. [26 Feb 1993, p.25]
    • Boston Globe
  28. Veronica Guerin hardly trusts you to follow its story, opening with the murder, then a series of titles that explain what's to follow.
  29. Highly unoriginal tale.
  30. The Treatment fails to do anything interesting with Jake.
  31. As films about the young and the horny go, I preferred the smarter approach director Jeffrey Blitz takes in "Rocket Science."
  32. A defective poker comedy where the poker is a lot more interesting than the people playing it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In short, there’s plenty of spectacle in Beauty and the Beast, which will be enough for many if not most young audiences. But there isn’t much magic, and what there is coasts on 26-year-old fumes.
  33. The Forger wants to be many things: gritty crime thriller, heist picture, domestic drama. Family bonds get “forged,” too, right? Director Philip Martin, who’s mainly done British TV work, is best known for “Prime Suspect 7.” Martin keeps things moving a little too briskly, perhaps. Scenes generally feel underdeveloped, and transitions abrupt.
  34. A bland, insistently amiable comedy that doubles as road movie.
  35. It's hard to care about people this generic - even when they're naked.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Breezily enjoyable for about 10 minutes, until you realize the entire movie is going to be pitched at the same exuberantly manic pace. It's like being trapped in an elevator with a performing poodle that doesn't know when to quit.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Doesn't seem to know whether it wants to be a sprightly sex comedy or an enigmatic little thriller. Unfortunately, it's neither very funny nor very thrilling.
  36. Offers some entertaining moments now and then in its relatively short running time.
    • Boston Globe
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Lawrence Kasdan's Body Heat--an homage to film noir--gets off to a nice start before it becomes entangled in its convoluted and somewhat uninteresting plot machinations.
    • Boston Globe
  37. A mildly entertaining but tepid extravaganza more suited to television than the big screen.
    • Boston Globe
  38. Is a truly political stoner movie even possible? The entire point of getting high is to take some of the sting out of life. The movie goes after easy targets and goes soft on the harder issues.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Movies can convey the fever of new love more intensely than almost any other medium, and Song One is best when it shrinks the world down to James and Franny alone together in a crowded city.
  39. The movie has embarrassingly limited ideas about both the sexes and sex. Like Sandra Bullock’s career woman in “The Proposal,’’ Abby appears to have never heard of intercourse, much less experienced it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Thriller fans might remember a terrific 1987 B flick called ''The Stepfather.'' One Hour Photo is that film, directed by an art student.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ends with a curious whimper instead of the bang it has been pointing toward; the filmmaker's reverence for his heroine seems to bind his hands.
  40. Janet McTeer provides a little ham to the role of a woman who dresses up her dogs because she misses her dead twin sons. But there's not nearly enough of her. Nor is there enough legitimate suspense.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Robert Pattinson isn't all that bad in Bel Ami. He just isn't right.
  41. What's most vexing about Portrait of Wally is its lack of nuance.
  42. What the writer and director, Lance Daly, means as some kind of transporting urban adventure for them is a disenchanting slog for us.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A meticulously observed, rapturously directed account of World War III and its aftermath as seen from the point of view of a spoiled young woman. The movie’s pretty fascinating before it goes bonkers.
  43. It will also make them laugh. Intentionally or not, director Rob Cohen (“Alex Cross”) has put together the most hilarious camp classic since “White House Down” (2013).
  44. Pretty uninspired material for a dream-teaming of actresses who currently rate among the edgiest of them all.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The problem with Hysteria is that it keeps patting itself and us on the back for knowing better.
  45. The crime is appallingly petty. But occasionally the friction between two actors' idiocy will produce a comic spark.
  46. As a combat action spectacle, the movie takes a straightforward, gritty approach that makes for mostly solid viewing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    And while the young director tends to skip over many of the larger societal issues plaguing many of the HHP participants, his desire to honestly platform the emotional heartbeat of his subjects still rings true.
  47. The movie has a jolly, half-remembered quality, as though it were adapted from a particularly rose-colored memoir.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie never fully clicks.
  48. You want the movie to stir your soul, push your intellect, or at the very least, break your heart. But it's such a repetitive and thinly constructed piece of filmmaking that the scope and complexity of Sampedro's case are turned to porridge.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie is largely set in a busy Paris restaurant, and, not surprisingly, the food looks terrific. You may come out hungry for poached sea bass and a little starved for drama.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In its refusal to connect the dots, Wild Grass is playful unto tediousness, and between Azéma's overly cutesy performance -- all Harpo Marx hair-frizz and popped eyes -- and Mark Snow's painfully (purposefully?) banal lounge-jazz score, the movie functions as a theoretical irritant rather than a film.
  49. Bring Wet-Naps to The Devil's Double. It's coated and fried in the same batter KFC uses for Extra Crispy chicken. The movie might be greasier, actually.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    And then there's Liev Schreiber as CIA operative John Clark. With less than 30 minutes of screen time, he's everything Affleck isn't - magnetic, clever, and delightful to watch. If only the filmmakers had possessed the courage to cast the splendid Schreiber instead of the feeble Affleck.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Older moviegoers may also recognize The Space Between Us as a dress-up variation on the old Jeff Bridges/Karen Allen movie “Starman” (1984), and by far the best parts have to do with Gardner’s often comic adjustments to life on Earth.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Gets better -- more rambunctiously astute -- as it goes, and its comic engine sputters into fitful life when Bernie Mac arrives on the scene.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A sweet-natured, terribly unthreatening drama about redemption and renewal, and it may matter more to the man who made it than the audiences who see it.
  50. Once again, even reasonably committed fans will need a scorecard to keep track of who's fighting whom. What's the real target audience - i.e. kids - supposed to make of it all?
  51. The new remake of Arthur is a thin copy of the 1981 original. But it has a few things going for it.
  52. This is a manic hour and a half. It's full of pushy, grabby, assertive, borderline obnoxious characters, not all of whom went to Harvard.
  53. Whether this movie works for you largely depends on whether you're willing to work for it. To which I say: Bring your gym clothes.
  54. At its best, the movie is provocative, sleekly assured, and a legit showcase for its intriguingly deep ensemble
  55. Everybody in the movie is so tightly wound that Walters seems a model of actorly limberness. She cuts through the movie with speed and mannish, zany wit.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It is spectacularly average. Neither an inspired reimagining nor a painful dud,
  56. Under a different set of circumstances - in a different society - the development might have flourished. But The Pruitt-Igoe Myth is a documentary, not fantasy.
  57. The trouble with Grumpy Old Men is the patronizing attitude -- ageism, really -- that takes a too-broad approach to their geriatric world and renders it plastic. It is too cute and sanitized to allow its performers much in the way of opportunity.
    • Boston Globe
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    So it is with St. Vincent, which might be Murray’s “Gran Torino” if you squint at it from one angle, or “Old Meatballs” if you come at it from another.
  58. Rodriguez does a fair job of keeping the zaniness coming: Vergara’s machine gun bra, Gibson delivering exposition in a “Star Wars” prop, bad guys offed by helicopter blades in dementedly creative ways. It’s enough that you’ll hope Rodriguez makes good on that new faux trailer — for “Machete Kills Again . . . in Space.”
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Rum Diary has been retroactively Hunter S. Thompson-ized. And not for the better.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is one schlockfest that may be enjoyed more by casual viewers than by hard-core fans, since writer-director Paul W.S. Anderson breaks with the established mythology of both properties whenever he feels like it. Like it matters.
  59. An intermittently arresting, mostly standard action entry that deals death noisily more than cleverly - a lot like the original.
  60. Things bottom out when Zoe not only hooks up with another lover (there is not an ounce of body fat in this movie), but also misses her son’s soccer game. And up until then we were all having a good time.
  61. Just a bunch of spotty sketches slapped together that will satisfy no one except the diehards.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Taking wobbly aim at our country's complicated love affair with guns, the movie's the very definition of a cheap shot.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A watchable disappointment. Sumptuous to look at, tastefully dull, and ultimately rather silly.
  62. Lively, if overlong, documentary.

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