Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,153 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown
Lowest review score: 0 P2
Score distribution:
5,153 movie reviews
  1. Affecting, troubling, dazzling film.
  2. Stillman has become a master at escalating the laughter by waiting an extra beat and then understating something devastatingly funny, as when someone looks Chris Eigeman's club manager, Des, in the eye and says, "I consider you a person of integrity - except, you know, in the matter of women."
  3. Films that achieve the dimension of seraphic embrace achieved by 'Innocence, as it explores a return to first love, are the rarest of the rare.
    • Boston Globe
  4. The sly and subtle Minus Man is a wicked little sidewinder of a black comedy.
  5. Beautifully crafted and brutally honest.
  6. Roberts and Erin Brockovich have Oscar contender written all over them.
  7. With Carrey hitting a career peak, this Grinch doesn't steal Christmas; it restores the season by helping energize us enough to make it through the whole thing.
    • Boston Globe
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Moves like hot mercury, and it draws a viewer so thoroughly into its world that real life can seem thick and dull when the lights come up.
  8. One of the year's most winning performances, Logue's Dex will grow on you as he stumbles toward emotional fullness.
  9. A civilized delight.
    • Boston Globe
  10. Slly, sublime, buoyant mischief that is virtually without parallel in 20th-century art, much less 20th-century film.
    • Boston Globe
  11. A gorgeous autumnal period piece that catches a vanishing proprietary class on the eve of its extinction in Ireland in 1920.
  12. The story is spun forth ravishingly, tenderly, and urgently, with a captivating mix of beauty, spare sophistication, and profound humanity.
  13. You can count on the fingers of one hand the number of works in any given year to which one is moved to apply the word ''masterpiece.'' Raul Ruiz's Time Regained is one of them.
  14. Terrific French film about that most universal of subjects - work.
  15. Deeper and richer in humanity than all but a handful of the American films released this year.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The one aspect of the original Producers that still stuns is the roaring, over-the-top, in-your-face thereness of its two lead performances.
  16. Simple, but loaded. It celebrates the humanity and humanism at the heart of Iran's remarkable flow of films, but it's also more of a rebuke to materialistic values than any ideologue could ever hope to be.
  17. We're in a golden age of comedy, and one of the reasons is Margaret Cho.
    • Boston Globe
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The impact of this stunning film - and the lessons to be learned from it - are as remarkable as when it was first released 30 years ago.
    • Boston Globe
  18. Few, if any, films this year will approach, let alone equal, Autumn Tale in its subtle sparkle.
  19. A sweet screenful of quirky chaos.
  20. Lawrence is back on the big screen, and it simply demands to be seen. Yes, again.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Foreign intrigue is raised to an art form.
  21. Not only exhilarating and cathartic. It's too funny to be ignored.
  22. Satisfying in every respect, it's a piece of blue-collar chamber music, never treating the characters cheaply, allowing them a complex entwinement of emotions.
  23. Quiet, powerful, contemplative, respectful of stillness, Eureka is the first film this year in which there is obvious greatness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Blistering and brilliant work.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie is pricelessly comic -- the Harvey/Joyce scenes catalog the couple's neuroses with glee -- but it just as often reaches for something richer.
  24. Guy Maddin is a scholar, poet, prankster, and ferociously devoted classicist who likes to resurrect dead cinemas and deader directors and make them vital all over again.
  25. Butler's approach is subtle: His documentary allows the story to unfold elegantly, without embellishment, and it is more powerful for that restraint.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Implicitly acknowledges and celebrates the glorious chicanery and self-delusion of this most American of businesses, and for that reason it may be the most oddly honest Hollywood document of all.
  26. Who most of these exquisitely costumed people are I have no idea, but they brush past the camera in such rapids of jubilation it's a wonder they don't knock the thing over. I watched most of the film exhilarated, but depressed that I'm not a big Russophile.
  27. An invigoratingly mordant comedy that proves that Alexander Payne's rambunctious debut, "Citizen Ruth," was no fluke.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The miracle is that 'The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers is better: tighter, smarter, funnier.
  28. In a crisply restored print, it's as joyous as ever. We loved them - yeah, yeah, yeah. Now we can love them all over again.
    • Boston Globe
  29. A grand, dark, grave, severe piece of first-rate cinema.
    • Boston Globe
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A heart-rending account of people trying to dodge the hurdles that politics puts in front of them. By the end of this humanist epic, some are ennobled by their struggle. Most are exhausted.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There are three Poles in The Pianist -- Szpilman, Polanski, and Frederic Chopin. Of the three, fittingly, Chopin speaks the loudest.
  30. The best film of 2001 was made in 1979.
  31. "In Cold Blood," "Badlands," "The Executioner's Song," and now, joining those grisly milestones on the heartland hit list, and every bit their equal, is Boys Don't Cry.
  32. Intriguing, arresting, delightfully refusing to be pigeonholed.
  33. Music for the eyes. That's why it has become a treasured classic. That's why we'll see it again and again.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Reflective, haunting, hilarious documentary.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A film noir? A backstage musical? A whodunit? A comedy? In truth, it's all of the above -- plus a kinky love story, an absorbing melodrama, and a mordantly jaded snapshot of postwar Paris -- and all of them are wonderful.
  34. It's terse, atmospheric, fatalistic, with vertiginous camera angles and edits offsetting its gray documentary flatness.
  35. Farnsworth's embodiment of old American values, with their combination of delicacy, reserve, and stand-alone independence, is a one-of-a-kind treasure.
  36. The surehandedly wrought, beautifully acted, almost unbearably tense In the Bedroom is a rare film, not to be missed.
    • Boston Globe
  37. Never has a film taken such relish in between-the-wars malice as Gosford Park.
  38. Bizarre, shadowy, enticingly eerie...more poetic, more tantalizingly original.
  39. First and foremost, Good Will Hunting is a film riding young, exuberant energies.
  40. Ten
    The new Abbas Kiarostami film is called Ten, and in it something amazing happens: nothing.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    For some of us, this constitutes a religious event.
  41. Mesmerizing and unforgettable.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As the Friedmans split apart like fissile neutrons, their story becomes five stories, none of which is remotely like the others.
  42. A deep, exhaustive, and moving piece of do-it-yourself detective work.
  43. Not since the original ''Star Wars'' trilogy has film dipped into myth and emerged with the kind of weight and heft seen in Peter Jackson's first installment of J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy.
    • Boston Globe
  44. Nobody ever placed brilliance in the service of silliness quite the way the Python gang did. Monty Python and the Holy Grail is stuffed with both.
    • Boston Globe
  45. A heady flow of brilliant stupidity.
  46. Its breadth, profundity, and stunningly rendered vision make idealism seem renewed and breathtaking again.
  47. Spacey is diamond-brilliant in a role that plays as if custom-made for him.
  48. Riveting tale of family dynamics packed with as much drama, conflict, and poignancy as the best feature film.
    • Boston Globe
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    At its most unsettling level, Spellbound asks us to consider what words are for and what childhood should be. It's as profound as anything you'll see this year, and, yes, it should have won the Oscar.
  49. But then Being John Malkovich is a brilliant juggling act, too, brilliantly brought off.
  50. Watching it is a nonstop high.
    • Boston Globe
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Is ''Dr. Strangelove" Kubrick's best movie? Along with ''Paths of Glory," absolutely.
  51. Like no movie before it, Adaptation risks everything -- its cool, its credibility, its very soul -- to expose the horror of making art for the business of entertainment.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a unique trip that flirts with hokeyness at the surface but that grows more compelling, awe-inspiring, and tragic the deeper you go.
  52. It isn't often that lives of quiet desperation are served up with such pearly restraint.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Gorgeously stoic art film.
  53. This is a love letter from one auteur to another that doesn't feel like a term paper. Instead, Far From Heaven is an honest-to-God drama with resonance all its own.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Longer on atmosphere and observation than on story, but you don't mind: Coppola maintains her quietly charged tone with a certainty that would be unbelievable in a second film if you didn't suspect genetics had a hand.
  54. Nothing momentous happens here, but Philibert has a magical sense of how to find the simple poetry lurking in the universal routine of being a kid. A lot of the film's lyricism is extracurricular.
  55. The worst thing about the first Quentin Tarantino picture in five years is that after 93 minutes of some of the most luscious violence and spellbinding storytelling you're likely to see this year, Kill Bill ends.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    To see Au Hasard Balthazar is to understand the limits of religious literalism in movies -- the limits, even, of movies themselves. Bresson pares everything away until all that's left are the things we do and the hole left by the things we could have done but didn't.
  56. The atmosphere is hypo-stylized, vividly generic and worse than real, like a doomy Frederick Wiseman documentary.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    All you really need to enjoy "Triplets" is a taste for the weird and the wonderful.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    So clear-eyed and three-dimensional that it makes the recent ''Pearl Harbor'' look like a bunch of kids playing dress up. Aspects of the film have dated, but in the important things it's more mature than anything proposed lately by modern Hollywood.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Chaplin's sentimental politics and peerless comic invention dovetailed more perfectly in this film than in any other he made.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Battle of Algiers is a thinking person's action film in which there are winners -- but no heroes.
  57. This is the first beautiful performance in the year's first great movie.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film that many consider the finest of its decade, Raging Bull, has aged well, and not just because it was filmed in black and white.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is insanely good, and the best time I've had at the movies in ages.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Unfolds with the serenity of a fable but underneath it draws intelligent, deeply troubled connections between the personal, political, and spiritual.
  58. Freshly viewed, the movie's melancholy seems to fit uncannily well in the moment we find ourselves now. In the film there are mentions of nuclear annihilation and worries that heedless lust and wanton partying could bring Rome a second fall.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    About the search for common ground, among journalists on all sides of the conflict and, through them, between viewers in America and the Arab world. Only within that common ground, Noujaim believes, can something like a workable, personal truth be found.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of his (Bergman's) most life-affirming films.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    That rose in the desert, a sequel that improves in every way upon its beloved predecessor and a romance that slowly builds a fire from embers thought dead.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is one of the most unforgiving ground-level documentaries about the music business ever made -- the six-string equivalent of "Hoop Dreams."
  59. A masterpiece.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's worth stressing how deeply pleasurable Moolaad is to watch.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a performance (Giamatti's) so nuanced and so real in its everyday pain that it doesn't stand a chance of winning an Oscar. But it should.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The chance to watch a four-star classic the way it was meant to be seen -- fresh print, big screen -- is so rare as to be worth the trip.
  60. This is a brilliantly structured hall of mirrors that wraps Catholicism and the movie industry into a tasty film noir.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Days of Being Wild shows Wong discovering his own cinematic language, and he's as astonished as we are.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    More than "Unforgiven," more than "Mystic River," it is Clint Eastwood's autumnal masterpiece.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is the kind of film that reminds you of what movies, at their best, are capable of.
  61. It's all we ask of a film but almost never get, as it first makes us squirm, then makes us cheer.
  62. Not about crashing into walls or crashing into other people. It's about crashing into yourself and living to tell the tale.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ghobadi shows us a world where a village pond can hold both rare goldfish and unforgivable evil, and where every step is onto booby-trapped terrain.

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