Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,372 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Moolaadé
Lowest review score: 0 Porky's
Score distribution:
5,372 movie reviews
  1. The secret here is that the movie is rather tasteless. It has the high, slightly nauseating stink of perfume on garbage.
  2. Joe
    Joe is one more in the line of Southern Gothic miserabilism that includes “Winter’s Bone” and “Beasts of the Southern Wild,” films that many have praised but some find condescending.
  3. The Korean documentary Planet of Snail is spare and unemphatic - too much so - with an abiding sweetness of spirit.
  4. A one-trick action thriller that feels like a poor cousin of an episode of ''24." Call it ''12."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Tries to wring laughs from just about every dusty stereotype about blacks and whites imaginable. But it's all cheap, lazy, and unoriginal.
  5. An abundance of style and an almost total lack of substance make Wong Kar-wai's Happy Together a visually arresting but ultimately unrewarding excursion. [31 Oct 1997]
    • Boston Globe
  6. It's two hours of slumming in a vision of hell hatched from bourgeois comfort. That, and not its unsavory subject matter, is what makes it bummer theater.
  7. As morally engaged as the movie is, it’s also argumentatively slack. Precisely because it’s so easy to agree that hunger is bad, it’s hard to agree what to do.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ramsay delivers an overdirected, conceptually obnoxious art film that's torture to sit through, listen to, and think about.
  8. People do stupid things all the time. My friend and I sat through Compliance, didn't we? But there is a level of stupidity displayed by the people in this movie that beggars belief. Their behavior is to stupidity as the Death Star is to a doughnut.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    The best audiences can hope for is that they, too, get amnesia and forget they ever saw this movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ye bites off substantially more than he can chew.
  9. The first step in getting beyond preaching to the converted is letting the other side show how wrong it might be.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Adrian Lyne pulls out more manipulative nonsense than Machiavelli ever thought of. Lyne stops at nothing to provoke artificial sentimental feelings from the audience. Like the movie itself, the audience's reaction is only skin deep. [18 Sep 1987, p.58]
    • Boston Globe
  10. Unfortunately, though, Rossato-Bennett and Cohen seem to think that the technique is a panacea. In fact, it is not even original, as music therapy in nursing homes has been around for some time.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A sociopolitical prankumentary in which the prank blows up in the filmmaker's face, exploding-cigar style.
  11. Watching the movie made me long for the big , risky ideas and entertainingly fearless filmmaking in David O. Russell's "I Heart Huckabees " and Spike Jonze's "Adaptation ," which Kaufman wrote. Both were similarly conceptual escapades, but they let it all hang out.
  12. Rarely is a movie audience asked to put up with so much noise for such a thankless payoff.
  13. A powerful film of suffering and sacrifice and desperation. But it's vacuous, banal, and, where its mix of sentiment and grisliness is concerned, rather despicable.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 25 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Take represents the downside of the new documentary renaissance.
  14. Is Borgman a fable? A fairy tale? A parable? An allegory? A burlesque of Western bourgeois life in the 21st century? One thing Dutch writer-director Alex van Warmerdam’s film isn’t is a black comedy, even if that’s what it’s meant to be. The movie’s black, all right, but a comedy has to be funny.
  15. No one in the film offers a shred of real proof that IBM cheated.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Sure, go ahead and take the kids. But, for pity's sake, read them the book first.
  16. Like the horror-flick hacks who infest Hollywood like termites, the Pangs don't build suspense, they assault the senses with twitchy photography and Danny's editing.
  17. Stardust certainly could have gone somewhere fun. But the magic and zip you need to get a blimp like this off the ground is scarce.
  18. If nothing else, Beloved Sisters is one of the most visually striking biopics around. Too bad you have to wade through so much verbiage in order to enjoy it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Dumbed down, tarted up, and almost shockingly uninspired, it's the worst superhero movie since "Green Lantern."
  19. "Star Trek VI" is one of the weaker additions to the Enterprise enterprise. It merely goes through the motions, including requisite moments that feel obligatory and uninspired. There's nothing gravely wrong here - no embarrassing scenes or egregious plot gaffes. There's simply nothing new, and certainly nothing fresh or reinvented. [6 Dec. 1991, p.53]
    • Boston Globe
  20. It plays like a crude "Godfather" parody, the sort that might amuse as a 10-minute sketch on "Saturday Night Live," but curdles and collapses as a 143-minute film. [09 Dec 1983]
    • Boston Globe
  21. The result is like an issue of National Geographic gone mad.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Mississippi Burning plays loose with truth, turning the history of the civil rights movement on its head. The filmmakers shamelessly transform what was ultimately a triumph of due process and nonviolent civil disobedience into an ugly might-makes-right spectacle. It's "Dirty Harry" coming at you from the left. [27 Jan 1989, p.72]
    • Boston Globe
  22. The movie is swept up in earnest self-importance.
  23. For too long, this movie asks us to be interested in something that rarely in the history of the service industry has been sustainably entertaining: how dull certain jobs can be.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Regrettably, it’s terrible poetry: a roughly chronological jumble of archival footage, unconvincing period reenactments, gauzy voice-overs, and half-baked ideas that makes one yearn for the stolid dullness of a History Channel documentary.
  24. Puzzle is neither puzzling nor much fun. It reminds you how much better Julie Delpy told the same story in “2 Days in New York.”
  25. This is an inept and unsubtle romantic fantasy about how black people and white people don't mix.
  26. Like so many of these farm-raised films, this one looks polished, but takes no risks, offers no surprises, and contains a final sequence that's laughable for its lack of courage.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Settles for the cliches of American suspense films, right down to an ending that leaves the door open to a possible sequel.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Even a fan, however, might prefer the excellent, recently released concert DVD "Pixies: Live at the Paradise in Boston" to this tepid behind-the-scenes experience.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    If you enjoy laughing at a movie, rather than with it, then you might get a few chuckles. [18 Dec 1980, p.1]
    • Boston Globe
  27. The one-sidedness of Farmageddon isn't just an artistic failing. It's an argumentative failing, too.
  28. It’s a fascinating story: part genetic mystery, part socio-racial tragedy. However, Laing’s life, despite its inherent melodrama, does not automatically lend itself to the screen.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Big Eyes may not be Tim Burton’s absolute worst movie — we’ll always have “Planet of the Apes” — but it’s pretty close to the bottom. It’s also the film that reveals his weaknesses as a director and, by their absence, his strengths. Gaudy, shallow, shrill, smug, the movie proves beyond a whisker of doubt that Burton has little interest in human beings unless they can be reduced to cartoons.
  29. It can seem sometimes that Hollywood has a monopoly on stupid, obnoxious comedy. Anyone who sees Klown will learn otherwise. Comedy can be just as stupid and obnoxious in Danish.
  30. There's just very little in Beautiful Boy that feels fresh or new or truly raw. The houses, that title, every emotion, even the false moves: They're all generic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Despite a frisky soundtrack that starts off with James Brown’s “Sex Machine” — trust me, it’s downhill from there — this is the visual equivalent of Muzak. You don’t have to see it to have seen it.
  31. Gabizon never establishes a consistent tone or point of view. Instead, we hop from one episode to the next, with no momentum and no reason to care about these people.
  32. It's all emotionally counterfeit, and that bogusness infects the comedy.
  33. Jeff Who Lives at Home devotes so much of itself to mocking the loneliness and personal shortcomings of these characters that once it stops jabbing and turns serious, you start laughing.
  34. Oranges and Sunshine is like a Mike Leigh movie drained of all its bodily fluids.
  35. This chronicle of an ’80s high school cross country coach leading a team of Mexican farm laborers’ kids to competitive glory may be based on a true story, but the forced drama doesn’t help it to feel that way.
  36. What is offensive is how the masquerade punks these other people - and to no seeming purpose, other than to provide Gandhi with footage for this documentary.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    A desperate, cynical self-parody.
    • Boston Globe
  37. The cast does capable work, but you’ll wish the movie concentrated more on the comedy, which has some zing, rather than the straighter elements, which quickly start to drag.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Jackson has marched the modern fantasy-action epic into a thundering blind alley; the movie exhausts your senses without ever engaging your imagination.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    As blandly lucid as Barney's is wildly and perplexingly imaginative.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Sorvino can't pass for a man, but that's beyond the point in this rarefied situation. She's beautiful and she can usually act, but here the only convincing thing she projects is fatigue from running around the garden all day.
  38. Its squandering of talent makes Class Action a film that deserves to be disbarred, not reviewed. [15 Mar 1991]
    • Boston Globe
  39. You couldn't ask for a better setting for a horror movie. What you could ask for is a better script.
    • Boston Globe
    • 58 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Gross and tasteless...this high-school romp mixes the gross and tasteless with sentimental mush.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    An attempt to turn the 2005 nonfiction bestseller into a high-energy docu-romp, Freakonomics is a misconceived botch.
  40. Lila is all come-ons without any charm.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ball's trying to be honest about adolescent coming of age, but since he's dishonest about everything else, the movie collapses in on itself.
  41. Never achieves the exhilarating feat of exemplifying the types of Hollywood movies it wants to unpack.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Except for the evocative sets and Randy Newman's upbeat musical score, Ragtime is better read than seen. [18 Dec 1981]
    • Boston Globe
  42. Misogynistic, homophobic, scatological — none of these words come up in any of the spelling bees that take place in Jason Bateman’s directorial debut, but they apply to the film.
  43. The movie has elements of road picture, social satire, and odd-couple romance, but mostly it's about lack of pacing and tone. Somewhere very (very) deep in here is a whiff of "Citizen Ruth," and who knows what Alexander Payne might have done with this material. Instead we know what writer-director Robbie Pickering has done with it, and that ain't much.
  44. More disappointing than the film’s inertia and amorphousness is its sacrifice of the real-world themes of class, money, corruption, and power. Unable to decide what story he wanted to tell, Téchiné hedges his bets and loses everything.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    I could pile on the cooking metaphors until you cried "uncle," but the fact remains that there's a very good movie in here that its makers have failed to bring off.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film is low budget but puffed with self-importance, and it offers proof that Hollywood filmmakers should probably steer clear of topics that actually matter.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    I say kill off everybody else and bring back Farrell for the sequel.
  45. The sequel goes down the tubes by spreading itself across four time zones and inviting comparison to the original by spending most of its time back in 1955, where another mess must be set right. [22 Nov 1989, p.35]
    • Boston Globe
  46. The movie treats trysting as comedy and yet is stingy with the laughs.
  47. For all the controversy surrounding Buffalo Soldiers, you'd think the film would at least be interesting.
  48. A lame little flat liner.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Hobbled by its vaguely insulting comic-book version of the '60s and by a humorlessness that can only come from talented people convinced they're creating work for the ages.
  49. The real problem with Harsh Times is Jim himself. Bale goes at the part with his usual intensity, but the character still seems like a psycho without psychology or a soul.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is a revenge thriller that's too taken with its own ambience to actually thrill.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    The film’s zippy graphics are a treat, but its zippy arguments are slipshod.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    It doesn't know if it wants to wallow in its characters' pity or to flesh them out with their own personalities. So it does both, with half-hearted results.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Diary of a Wimpy Kid the movie returns Kinney's tale to live-action reality, and the party's over.
  50. Isn't all wrong. But even at its very best, it's just all right.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    While there are moments of eldritch atmosphere and a few pro forma jolts, nothing here justifies our attention, let alone the film's inexplicable R rating.
  51. Ultimately, Jordan's vision is so murky that Ned Kelly remains as foreign to us as wombat stew.
  52. For the most part, Fluffy’s material is just that — fluff, with a touch now and then of bile and bad taste.
  53. There's no real journalism here, just the sort of appalling revisionism that can turn a bloodbath into a beach party.
  54. Back to the Future III has no future. The reason is that it never works up much of a past as it sends its gull-winged DeLorean time machine back to the Old West. In effect, it goes back to the Age of Steam and runs out of gas. [25 May 1990, p.45]
    • Boston Globe
  55. Yes
    The result is a unique time at the art house: a work whose badness becomes guiltily pleasurable, like a Harlequin romance novel masquerading as a dissertation.
  56. This is all a long way of saying that the best way to better understand the man who made those and dozens of other movies is simply to see them. There's no case to be made for a mangy shortcut like Hitchcock. It's all surface and formula.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    I don't know if I've ever seen a movie as spectacularly tone-deaf as Hyde Park on Hudson.
  57. Writer-director Boaz Yakin delivers his conflicting elements mostly as intended, and with obvious ambition. But he fails to take care of certain fundamentals - most problematically, coaxing out the emotion he's seeking from Statham and young newcomer Catherine Chan.
  58. It’s just like the Kenny Rogers song says: “You’ve got to know when to hold ’em, know when to fold ’em.” It’s time for this Gambler to walk away.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Hopefully the last, of the fake trailer spinoffs of 2007's "Grindhouse." It makes last year's "Machete" look like "The King's Speech."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Aggressive visual invention is rarely its own reward, and this movie does nothing to better the odds.
  59. The real problem with The Astronaut Farmer is that it has no spark.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s been a while since there’s been this much dead air onscreen; over and over, Smith sets up a sequence, lets his actors shpritz, and stands by as the energy fades into giggly catatonia.
  60. One could argue that ''Lock, Stock'' and Snatch are essentially the same movie - crime comedies marked by an outlandish visual style. Which raises the question of whether Ritchie has the range to do anything else.
    • Boston Globe
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Hints at a place where desire, fear, pleasure, and power all intersect, but it never actually goes there.
  61. Phar Lap wastes its brilliant potential through embarrassingly inept acting, a cloying soundtrack, stereotyped characters and pedestrian direction. [13 Jul 1984]
    • Boston Globe
  62. Occasionally wills itself to rude, crude life. But most of the time it's pretty limp.

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