Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,140 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 20 Feet from Stardom
Lowest review score: 0 Bratz
Score distribution:
6140 movie reviews
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There’s a line between enjoyably stupid and stupid-stupid, and Nerve sails over it right around the halfway mark.
  1. Barber, who directed the neglected, unabashedly satisfying vigilante thriller “Harry Brown” knows how to get the blood pumping and stoke an audience’s craving for righteousness, vengeance, and vicarious sadism. What he lacks is the woman’s touch, if by that one means nuance, ambiguity, and empathy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A sweet-natured, terribly unthreatening drama about redemption and renewal, and it may matter more to the man who made it than the audiences who see it.
  2. Brown Sugar fails to produce an image of hip-hoppery as fascinating and complex as the moment when Halle Berry set her tongue wagging during a ghetto-fabulous grind with Warren Beatty in ''Bulworth.''
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Ice Age: The Meltdown is pure sequel product that should make children and undemanding grown-ups happy even as it lacks anything resembling storytelling inspiration.
  3. To see this final installment is to know: It’s time.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    When the new movie wings it, it sputters but clears the runway. When it sticks to the script, it crashes and burns.
  4. Doing nothing special, Freeman manages to make the picture seem wiser, funnier, and more eloquent than it is.
  5. You're left with an inert, politically neutral movie, a satire that can't bring itself to properly satirize anything.
  6. The trouble with Quantum of Solace is that the frills are a mess, too. Even the customary opening title sequence, with its writhing silhouettes and screechy theme song by Jack White and Alicia Keys, is a cheesy throwback to the Roger Moore era: Ladies and gentlemen, the Quantum of Solace dancers!
  7. Imagination is what these filmmakers could use more of, as their ingenious concept doesn’t develop much beyond a gimmick.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    iIf you can ignore a ridiculously overbearing soundtrack - a big if - the film's a pleasant bauble. Still, those coming in cold may be forgiven for thinking they've wandered into "Atonement" remade as a farce.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    You realize the movie isn’t nearly as clever as it looks.
  8. This movie is especially egregious since it bundles the civil rights era, garden-variety bigotry, and the achievements of Ernie Davis, the first African-American to win the Heisman Trophy.
  9. These movies are more about the experience of hearing girls and women who should know better holler at the screen. They could just as well be at a concert.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    So appallingly slipshod in all the usual departments is this sequel to the engaging martial-arts comedy Western ''Shanghai Noon'' that you're tempted to cite its makers for contempt.
  10. This is a corny tale, told with both generous helpings of deli-sliced cheese and a brief stretch of chilling tumultuousness.
  11. When the action sequences move into the sky-diving stuff, they give you a real rush.... Otherwise, though, Point Break is all wet. Too bad, because you always get the sense in a Kathryn Bigelow outing ("Near Dark," "Blue Steel") that she's trying to push a genre into new places. [12 July 1991, p.54]
    • Boston Globe
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie is both stunning on the level of visual pageantry and curiously inert as cinema.
  12. An unremarkable comedy-drama.
  13. Despite its lush photography, Green Card has the texture of peanut butter. It's more romantic than comedic, but there isn't an abundance of either. [11 Jan 1991]
    • Boston Globe
  14. The pre-Thanksgiving release of Jonathan Levine’s The Night Before celebrates those Christmas blessings that are beloved by all: scatological humor, smarmy sentimentality, and gross product placement.
  15. There are moments when Hill and Giler dare to turn Undisputed into an episode of ''Oz'' - albeit an insipid, belligerence-, and sex-free episode.
  16. This is a movie you could watch in your sleep.
  17. Fascinating but frustrating.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    With The Invention of Lying, the British comic actor Ricky Gervais has come up with a wickedly funny idea for a movie - and then purged the wickedness right out of it.
  18. Every now and then, Benny & Joon makes you think it's going to finally take off, but it never does. It looks good but has credibility problems even on the level of whimsical fairy tale. [16 Apr 1993, p.86]
    • Boston Globe
  19. There are echoes of Roman Polanski’s “Rosemary’s Baby” in all of this that are impossible to miss.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Trishna should move the soul and engage the tear-ducts, yet it passes by as distant as it is lovely. And the blame must fall on the movie's star, Freida Pinto.
  20. The unworthy new Hollywood remake of Japan's horror phenomenon, ''Ring,'' has packed on a definite article and a whole lot of hooey.

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