Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,097 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Girlhood
Lowest review score: 0 Uncommon Valor
Score distribution:
6097 movie reviews
  1. The actors also acquit themselves well singing the film's numerous tunes. Breslin's voice is pleasantly melodic, while Nivola sounds like someone who's been grinding it out on tour for years.
  2. I'm not getting the most of his (Washington) charisma or enough of that million-dollar dental work. I'm not getting the joy, and I miss that.
  3. David Frankel’s film reduces an extraordinary life to a predictable template of bullying, resolve, success, disappointment, and platitudes — a pattern repeated two or three times until the genuinely moving finale.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film doesn't embarrass itself or dishonor its predecessor, which is something.
  4. Lively, if overlong, documentary.
  5. Less a documentary than a PR package with a chip on its shoulder.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Zizek is a revolutionary playing a comedian playing a revolutionary. Which makes him worth watching, even in this movie.
  6. A treatment of Foster so reverential it verges on camp.
  7. Elle Fanning is impeccably cast as Jesse, a quiet, sweet-natured ingénue shuttling between sketchy photo shoots and her clichéd newcomer’s digs in a seedy Pasadena motel.
  8. Plays more like an exercise in nostalgia than a dramatic re-creation of a triumphant fight for civil rights.
  9. Shopworn to the bone.
  10. Mostly it's Paredes' imperious - then surprisingly generous - high-handedness that carries High Heels. [20 Dec 1991]
    • Boston Globe
  11. A rather pat, occasionally desperate road comedy.
  12. Exhausting and seemingly endless.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In this TV reality show masquerading as a movie documentary, Brian Herzlinger is a creepy voyeur, a run-of-the-mill loser who obsesses about living the celebrity high life but lacks the talent to pull it off.
  13. Best, probably, to appreciate the movie for what Slattery, Hoffman, and the cast do most effectively: craft a pervasive atmosphere of tired people trudging through tired circumstances that only seem to grow more, well, tiring.
  14. Everyone's Hero is sincere and heartwarming; sometimes it's funny.
  15. More vulgar than funny.
  16. Ford and Pfeiffer deliver craftsmanlike work, but the film steadily unravels as Zemeckis tries to ratchet up the suspense.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Sensitively written, nicely shot, expertly acted, and intelligently ambiguous, Nobody Walks still manages to send you out with a shrug.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Glib, fast-paced entertainment that barely leaves a mark - which, given the subject, is just plain wrong.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What’s nice about this movie, actually, is that you can get a few shameless laughs out of it and then forget you saw it at all.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Wonderful characters, these three, and The Hard Word never figures out what to do with them.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Adding to the general air of ''What the hell?'' is Australian pop singer Natalie Imbruglia as Lorna, the beautiful superspy who falls for our hero. With Lorna's help, Johnny discovers that Sauvage is plotting to take over the British throne -- the Battle of Hastings wasn't good enough, it seems.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The production design is swank, the score impassioned. We should be riveted. Instead, you may feel you’ve seen this movie before, and, in a sense, you have: Woman in Gold plays remarkably like 2013’s “Philomena” with a change of cast and a different historical outrage.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There are good performances and fleeting moments of exquisite moviemaking, but the experience as a whole is an evolutionary dead end.
  17. Martin is lots of friendly fun, proving once again that he is an actor with untapped range and style. Without him, the movie would deflate. [20 Dec 1991, p.54]
    • Boston Globe
  18. Before long, it runs out of steam, playing like the pilot for a TV sitcom called "Baby Knows Best." [13 Oct 1989, p.37]
    • Boston Globe
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For every insight, there are a half-dozen meandering conversations and unguided reminiscences.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Only Jane, as the cop who knows exactly what Mrs. Collins’s wayward daughter needs, has the sense of threat the movie is seeking. His and Woodley’s scenes together are dirty and alive.

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