Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,356 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 I'm the One That I Want
Lowest review score: 0 From Justin to Kelly
Score distribution:
5,356 movie reviews
  1. This is that rare art flick whose subject goes nuts because his work is not self-indulgent ENOUGH.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A black-and-white fever dream, and, like all dreams, its meanings are elusive. It’s opaque, maddening, often pretentious, yet the pretensions may be on purpose, to push us away from the adulterous colonials at the story’s center and reveal the Africa they’re too obsessed with each other to see.
  2. Signe Baumane opens her sardonically hilarious, sneakily moving, autobiographical animated feature, Rocks in My Pocket, with what looks like a darker version of one of those chipper psycho-pharmaceutical ads.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is the kind of film that reminds you of what movies, at their best, are capable of.
  3. Riding a mood that's tilted to the jazzy blues that Eddie prefers to Bobby's blasting rock on the car radio, Diamond Men is a sparkly film that's easy to love.
    • Boston Globe
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is the meatiest role Tautou has had post-''Amelie'' and she drops the zombie-pixie act for once, giving us a character who's caught in a daily dance between propriety and abandon, and who can only dance faster as desperation sets in.
  4. Watching the uncertain and disappointing new apartheid documentary Amandla! A Revolution in Four-Part Harmony'' is like going to the lecture of an impassioned but really disorganized professor.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a honey of a performance: controlled, achingly human, and funny in the deepest ways.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    O'Horten is a precise, deadpan drama of slapstick existentialism - a Bent Hamer movie, in other words.
  5. The longer the film goes on, the more you crave a vaster history of modern Liberia, originally a colony founded by former slaves from the United States.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What’s under the film’s surface is intriguing enough, but it’s the surface itself that holds you in a dark trance. A portrait of alienation filmed from the alien’s point of view — or is it just a woman’s? — the movie’s a cinematic Rubik’s Cube that snaps together surprisingly easily, yet whose larger meanings remain tantalizingly out of reach.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Some movies rest on an actor's face, and The Counterfeiters has a great one.
  6. If you go into "Wanted and Desired" with preconceptions, prepare to feel them challenged and altered, even if they are ultimately confirmed. The facts speak loudly.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In After the Wedding Susanne Bier pushes the envelope further, toward operatic passion and the visual symbolism of Ingmar Bergman.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Nolan brings his Batman trilogy to a close with a majestic, almost completely satisfying crash. Everything feels epic about the film: the characters, the effects, the emotional stakes - even the missteps (and there are more than a few).
  7. A seductively corrosive horror story that also potently suggests the ways war can shatter childhood.
    • Boston Globe
  8. Deeper and richer in humanity than all but a handful of the American films released this year.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Less striking for its storyline than for the world it presents -- a rural moonscape of coal-dust, casual environmental disaster, and atavistic behavior.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie is more pure, profane enjoyment than a body should have in the dog days of August.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A note of paranoia creeps in that nods to classic film noir on one hand and baroque misogyny on the other. Or maybe this is just Garland’s dank idea of what men do when they’re left to their own devices: Create dream mates from the flayed skin of their fantasies.
  9. Installment six of the Harry Potter’ series, The Half-Blood Prince, merely gets us one movie closer to the finale, which, apparently is so big (and by big, I mean “$$$$’’) that it’s being split into two parts.
  10. Terrific French film about that most universal of subjects - work.
  11. He's (Willard) a one-man storm of escalating inanity, and he's hilarious.
    • Boston Globe
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Joss Whedon’s Much Ado About Nothing is just about the sloppiest Shakespeare ever put on the screen. It may also be the most exhilarating — a profound trifle that reminds you how close Shakespeare’s comedies verge on darkness before pirouetting back into the light.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film bears a resemblance to such multicharacter dramas as Robert Altman's ''Short Cuts" and Paul Thomas Anderson's ''Magnolia" -- like them, it's a portrait of a society straining at the seams -- but it manages the neat trick of being both charming and bilious.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Cool, carnal, and lethal, The Last Mistress is a period drama with a difference.
  12. Has to be appreciated simply for doing its job, for being the only thriller I've seen recently that made me wonder how my knuckles ended up in my mouth.
  13. Maddin's movies are easy, too. Point your eyes at the screen; the magic follows.
  14. Quite easily Live-in Maid could have descended into a kind of Joan Crawford-Bette Davis gorgon salute. But everyone here seems way too smart for that, though apparently the movie is being prepped for an English-language version. So beware.
  15. Add to those John Curran’s adaptation of Robyn Davidson’s autobiographical book “Tracks.” In it he presents a vision of nature that shimmers with uncanny beauty and eerie solitude, transcended by Mia Wasikowska in one of the best performances of the year.

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