Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,073 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Poetry
Lowest review score: 0 The Skulls
Score distribution:
6073 movie reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Fifth Estate is itself the response of an entrenched and corporatized information system toward something it barely comprehends. It makes a media format that has sustained us for decades — the two-hour movie — feel like a 20th-century dinosaur.
  1. The Sentinel isn't an entire season of ''24" smushed into a bland two hours of movie? Does Kiefer Sutherland know?
  2. New York, I Love You wants us to know that the city is a sexy, romantic, thrillingly random place where anything can go down. Sadly, two of those things are your eyelids.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    People Like Us is neither optimal nor prime.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As the implausibilities and conspiracies and double-crosses pile up, Broken City paints itself into a corner. A plot can be confusing as long as the filmmakers themselves don't seem confused, but that's not the case here.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Has a raggy charm, like the dogs, and a solid moral ending. For a late-summer children's film, it does the job.
  3. Takes a leaf from the "Psycho" handbook and abandons its star for stretches here and there.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The latest installment in the venerable sci-fi action franchise turns out to be a straight-up war film, grim and muscular and thundering and joyless. It's the color of cement, and it weighs as much, too.
  4. It makes you wonder if the series' animators, who took time out for "Rio" just before this, aren't so secretly yearning to sail different creative waters.
  5. Once the vulgar comedy dissipates, we're left with poorly photographed, bullet-riddled summer-action mayhem. The only thing drunker than Hancock is the editing and camerawork.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    In sum, a big, honking tutti-frutti sundae of a movie that nonetheless is shot through with authentic feeling.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The new version is a shiny piece of hardware that might as well be called "Sleuth 2.0," and it's exactly what you would expect from Pinter: very clever, extremely cold. Maliciously entertaining, too, until the halfway point, when you suddenly start wondering why anyone should care.
  6. There is one bright spot. Ellie Kendrick plays Dolly's silly, breathlessly romantic little sister, Kitty.
  7. The movie, instead, is a work of giddy self-sabotage that seems determined to matter and not matter at the same time.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is back-to-basics stuff, which turns out to be not such a bad idea.
  8. Wilson has some fun lampooning ’80s action tropes, but he’s also just doing Dwight Schrute with a twang at times. McBrayer and Garcia barely get to play one-note characters, let alone ones that you’ll remember.
  9. There's something wrong with this picture, and the problem is there on Smith's face -- Smith looks distressingly I-was-an-Oscar-nominee bored. That goes double for Jones.
  10. The first thing you notice about this so-so adaptation of James Ellroy's novel is the shoddy acting.
  11. The message is clear almost immediately: charity not vanity.
  12. Like most of Hallström's Hollywood movies ("The Cider House Rules," "Chocolat"), this one is excruciatingly tasteful.
  13. It’s a brutal bit of screen poetry that’s matched too infrequently by the aching human stories director Fedor Bondarchuk is so anxious to tell.
  14. As cartoon rip-offs go, Open Season can be surprisingly entertaining, in a made-for-6-year-olds kind of way.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A well-intentioned indie that tries to be a "real" version of a Hollywood romantic comedy and ends up feeling more ersatz than ever.
  15. Too glossy to truly immerse audiences in the horrors it depicts.
  16. These are not the marks of true cinema; they're the makings of a droopy karaoke video.
  17. The film looks great, boasting all the elegant period details that are expected in tasteful French adaptations of treasured national literature, with beautifully photographed Bordeaux landscapes and luxurious interiors. As for the human element, however, the mood is more apathetic than tragic.
  18. The filmmakers don't appear to know what's important, let alone how to pace an epic for big drama and maximum thrills.
  19. The movie is full of risible pontifications about the nature of art but falls well short of capturing the angst of creative frustration.
  20. The crime is appallingly petty. But occasionally the friction between two actors' idiocy will produce a comic spark.
  21. There are two reasons to put up with Soul Men, and that's the soul men themselves. Samuel L. Jackson and Bernie Mac appear to be having a good time, and for most of this raunchy, poorly orchestrated buddy comedy, that's enough.

Top Trailers