Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,372 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 The Master
Lowest review score: 0 Porky's
Score distribution:
5,372 movie reviews
  1. Magnolia is "Short Cuts" with hope. It's my kind of mess.
  2. It's a celebration of free expression that treats youth like a fierce and beautiful animal, and never attempts to tame it. In Pump Up the Volume, the "why-bother" generation finds a voice, and begins to bother. [22 Aug 1990, p.47]
    • Boston Globe
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    I'm wary of implying that it's your civic duty to see The House I Live In, but - guess what - it is. And see it with someone whose views are different from your own. We're going to need everyone to help get us out of this mess.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As the title implies, though, Keep on Keepin’ On has more on its mind. The film’s as much about the young Kauflin’s struggles — as a 21st-century Asian-American naïf trying to succeed in a 20th-century art form created by African-Americans, as a blind man navigating the often callous New York jazz scene. It’s also about the ongoing health of jazz itself as the music recedes further from the mainstream into the protective world of festivals and small clubs.
  3. There's plenty of invention and exuberant vigor in the chopsocky, and Wilson's cool, ironic drollery provides the perfect foil for Chan's heroics.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    An illuminating and entertaining study of an underground culture that has become part of the American mainstream.
    • Boston Globe
  4. That commendable sense of balance, which Dolgin and Franco use to approach this family reunion, ultimately makes the finished product devastating.
  5. More a bleak docu-melodrama than an esoteric morality play.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Somers Town, is a trifle: A short black-and-white lark with sharp edges and a soft center. It has its raptures, though, and then some. A disarmingly slight tale of adolescent friendship, Somers Town is one of those rare movies that seems to discover itself as you watch it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A charming, spiky period piece that might be called "Boo Radley: The Final Years."
  6. The characters look as if they’d be more comfortable with intertitles than spoken dialogue. And the faces — Marion Cotillard as Ewa, the beleaguered Polish immigrant of the title, holds a close-up as well as Lillian Gish or Louise Brooks.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Tommy Lee Jones makes his feature directing debut here, and the film is as weathered, subtle, and sympathetic as the actor's own face.
  7. The biggest complaint about Brooklyn Castle is that there's not enough of her. A presence as magnetic as Vicary's demands more screen time. How did she come to chess (a notoriously male-dominated game)? How did she come to 318?
  8. Circo offers a fascinating mix of backstage drama and family dynamics.
  9. Tamblyn's surprisingly measured performance commands attention.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Succeeds in its central goal: to turn a forgotten class of women into real, memorable human beings who deserve a different life.
  10. Here the result is often disjointed and frustrating. That 2,000 people lived in the cellars of the Hermitage during the siege of Leningrad is certainly remarkable but not altogether germane to the fate of art during the war.
  11. It's the kind of romantic comedy that doesn't cheapen the word ''heartwarming.''
  12. The film's bountiful warmth and gusto do their work. By the end, we feel part of the family, too.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Wants to claim Bukowski (1920-1994) as a 20th-century West Coast Walt Whitman -- a people's poet of modern degradation. Through a selective presentation of his writing and a reverently crass treatment of his life, it makes a funny, often intensely moving case, and you're having such a good time that you're glad to let it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A less than inspiring documentary about extremely inspiring individuals, High Ground is worth seeing for what it shows rather than how it shows it.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Think of it as "Glee" without music. Without a net, too.
  13. In short, A Christmas Story isn't just about Christmas; it's about childhood and it recaptures a time and place with love and wonder. It seems an instant classic, a film that will give pleasure to people not only this Christmas, but for many Christmases to come. [19 Nov 1983, p.1]
    • Boston Globe
  14. Code Black shows the passion, frustration, and skill of those who work to heal despite the system, but it remains in the dark about why that system is broken and how it can be fixed.
  15. Career Girls is a film that knows how wounding and complicated life can be, yet still believes in, and convincingly renders, the healing power of friendship. [15 Aug. 1997, p.D4]
    • Boston Globe
  16. It's as much a portrait of a kind of artist as it is a document of a city's evolving sense of style.
  17. Merry, filthy, unstoppably hormonal, Serbis feels very much like the sort of movie that happens when no one is minding the store.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The result is one of the most unforgiving ground-level documentaries about the music business ever made -- the six-string equivalent of "Hoop Dreams."
  18. It’s both ridiculous and ridiculously romantic, which is an apt description of a work shaped like a heart and structured like a pretzel.
  19. The bleakness of Rosetta will not be for all, but it's one of the best films of the year.

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