Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,124 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Climates
Lowest review score: 0 All About Steve
Score distribution:
5,124 movie reviews
  1. It's taken Dreamgirls 25 years and several false starts to get to the screen, so it's a shame to see what a rush job it feels like.
  2. The characters look as if they’d be more comfortable with intertitles than spoken dialogue. And the faces — Marion Cotillard as Ewa, the beleaguered Polish immigrant of the title, holds a close-up as well as Lillian Gish or Louise Brooks.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Does a terrific job of evoking the electric magic of an extraordinary era.
  3. Flight is a so-so movie with Denzel Washington as a commercial-airline pilot who crash-lands a plane while drunk, high, hung over, and horny. It doesn't do much that you couldn't anticipate just by seeing the trailer - the trailer is more exciting than the movie itself.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's that central dance between teacher and student that makes the movie both hard to watch and worth your attention - a subtle waltz of power in which it's difficult to tell who's leading until too late.
  4. Fresh, original, and arresting.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Turns out to be one of the finer peeks into the creative process of staging a play. Granted, that's a tiny genre, and the film's core audience -- theater majors and the people who love them -- is narrow. The lessons, however, are big.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Flattens you with concussive detail and the awfulness of war; it plays like "Saving Private Ryan" as remade by a Continental mathematician flipping out on Ecstasy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Stunning performances help make The Sleepy Time Gal a thoughtful, moving piece that faces difficult issues with honesty and beauty.
  5. It's all we ask of a film but almost never get, as it first makes us squirm, then makes us cheer.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Shine a Light did something I didn't think was possible. It got me caring about the Rolling Stones again.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A remarkable look at the people behind an organization that understands its limitations.
  6. The idea is to share with us that this show happened. But gluttons for these artists and for music festivals in general might wonder, as I have, whether there's any way the filmmakers might share more of the remaining 123 1/2 hours.
  7. This is a party, and you're either having a good time or wondering when Akin is going to get down to business. But for an hour and a half, fun is the business.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This doesn't feel like art, it feels like a cop-out, as though Durkin couldn't decide how to end his movie, so he didn't. He's a mature filmmaker - a natural - but he's still thinking in shorts.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film's case against overdevelopment needs to be, and could be, aggressive, airtight. It should play to the unconverted. Instead, The Unforeseen gives us . . . poetry.
  8. Like most films about gay men, Undertow can't envision a normal life of couplehood. But Fuentes-Léon works in a blithe and breezy magic-realist manner that fends off attendant feelings of depression.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This crudely powerful film is a throwback. Unfolding at an elliptical pace that feels like a revelation, or tedium, or both, Japon recalls the glory days of 1970s art-house filmmaking.
  9. Piercingly co-written and directed by Susanne Bier, the movie dramatizes one man's collapse and the other's surprising maturation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The movie’s a chocolate box of nougaty performances, from Christopher Plummer’s delightful depiction of Tolstoy as a ribald old naïf to Paul Giamatti twirling his waxed mustache and playing to the gallery as Vladimir Chertkov.
  10. In the case of Jeremy Irons playing the aloof English billionaire who owns the bank, that's dinner theater. But it's of the highest caliber.
  11. Enormously enjoyable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's an "Annie Hall" for the iPod generation: über-designed, pleasing to the touch, making up in generic sweetness what it lacks in bite.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Lunchbox isn’t an example of bravura moviemaking or cutting-edge style but simply a tale told with intelligence, restraint, and respect.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Remarkably, ''Me and You" doesn't shock so much as soothe.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    May not be the best movie ever made about the perils of family life, but it is among the most ruthlessly comic.
  12. From start to finish there's a shimmer of discovery about it - our discovery of it, Coppola's discovery of how much she can do.
  13. Every moment... is a cleverly constructed live-action joke on aloofness: The world is ending, and these people are too self-centered to notice.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The arrival of Raúl Ruiz’s final work, Night Across the Street, brings the total to four, an elegant, clear-eyed bridge game of artists playing their last trump cards.
  14. Presents enough teasing glimpses into the dancer’s personal and inner life to demand a fuller picture.

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