Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,905 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Moonlight
Lowest review score: 0 The Nutcracker
Score distribution:
5905 movie reviews
  1. I wish I could say there is something pleasurable in watching John Goodman reminisce about the good old days while impaled on a steering wheel in the Volvo he's crashed on a California freeway, but I can't find what it is.
  2. "Wolverine" feels enslaved to its many masters - Marvel Comics, Hollywood, and the young men who devour their products - never sidestepping the déjà vu it inspires.
  3. The thematic stuff, while well-intentioned, is also clunky, and ultimately beside the point. Action, obviously, is what you’re after.
  4. It’s not a good sign when the first few minutes of a movie about singing, dancing, rapping, video-camera-wielding teenagers reminds you of a certain grimy horror franchise.
  5. Bland though it is, "Havana Nights" could be the start of a globe-bettering franchise -- and across history, too: "Dirty Dancing: Monticello Mornings"; "Dirty Dancing: Gaza Strip Afternoons."
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Before this urban revenge melodrama falls apart in a clatter of plot absurdities and pretensions, it has its loopy charms.
  6. You put up the cash, the movie clunks.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's off-putting, rude, misshapen, and more often than not hysterically funny. The second half, sadly, is an ear-splitting train wreck.
  7. Bait ends up seeming pretty wormy.
    • Boston Globe
  8. Once a hurricane blows Gere and Lane into each other's arms, all the director's tasteful style and good sense turn into mush. Given the material, I suppose it has to.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Life as We Know It gives bland and predictable a good name.
  9. Though offering some chilling twists on the usual conventions, employing wit and restraint where otherwise the filmmakers might have relied on the contents of an abattoir, Aftershock is ultimately predictable in its litany of who lives and who dies, and doesn’t try to be too ironic or self-reflexive about it.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    There's an interesting movie in here, too, about the isolation of Indian brides brought to a new country by strange new husbands and mistreated, but Provoked rarely ducks below its glossy surface to go there.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    One walks out of Man of the Year aching for the squandered opportunities.
  10. What might have proven an illuminating perspective on familiar issues disappoints as Bouchareb fails to turn his outsider’s point of view into new insights, and instead takes the easy route, falling back on familiar stereotypes in his tour of US misogyny and xenophobia.
  11. Has there been a more tormented or intense study of the ambivalence of revenge than Penn’s performance in Eastwood’s “Mystic River” (2003)? Penn might not agree with Eastwood’s politics, but when it comes to probing a killer’s soul he couldn’t find a better model.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The real seduction Crudup pulls off is that he makes it seem possible that the character hasn't actually done all of these awful things.
    • Boston Globe
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Sitter pushes the envelope with such sloppy gusto that you have to give in occasionally, and its comic timing finds its rhythm about every fifth joke.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It just plonks down the actress and a handful of stellar co-stars without much in the way of a script, storyline, or actual jokes. Yet you may still come out with a smile on your face. It’s very odd.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Alas, it aspires to be an epic drama but suffers from an acute identity crisis: It can't decide if it wants to be history, drama, or a cry for peace in the Mideast.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Where Bieber’s first concert documentary, 2011’s “Justin Bieber: Never Say Never,” chronicled his rise to fame, his new one is damage control.
  12. In the end, it's hard to see a real reason for the movie's existence. We already have Muppets.
  13. This sequel, with the return of the first movie's insatiably slutty Los Angeles collegians, is as vulgar as its predecessor and just as almost-smart.
  14. Its pile-driving succession of set pieces comes at you with numbingly relentless efficiency, presumably in the hope that you won't notice or care how dumb it all is.
    • Boston Globe
  15. A sequel seemingly eager to assert that monster mashes are about B-movie chills not "Twilight'' melodrama. Eager to a fault, ultimately.
  16. Despite being well acted and sweetly moving when it strips down to the tender poem at its heart, Till Human Voices Wake Us spends too much time playing to an otherworldly suspense that simply isn't there.
  17. As the eviscerations ensue, the truth becomes undeniable: This is easily the most gruesome, most pointless, episode of "Scooby Doo" ever.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Like everything in this humorless new genre, "Chronicles" comes with its own snap-together mythology.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    "I'll be back," the man said, and he kept the promise, but I'm not sure we wanted him back like this.
  18. The mess that's been made with all this money is maddening. This isn't economical moviemaking. It's a deluxe trailer for "Eragon 2."

Top Trailers