Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,857 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Hugo
Lowest review score: 0 The Nutcracker
Score distribution:
5857 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Formulaic enough to suggest that franchise would be B level at best, a TV series at worst. But it's also just good enough to make you want to watch it, anyway.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A mostly lumbering, occasionally rousing epic that walks a bizarre line between historical fact and Hollywood wishful thinking.
  1. For a movie about serial killings and media sensationalism, Cronicas sure is wimpy.
  2. So where does that leave this coming-of-age comedy written and directed by Jan Ole Gerster? Somewhere in the middle, lukewarm and inoffensive, trying hard not to be plebeian or pretentious.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There may once have been a good and a bad film fighting for the soul of The Last Exorcism, but in its final moments, cinema's dark forces triumph emphatically.
  3. Though it initially shows signs of overcoming its creakiness, “Capital” loses value when its screenwriters try too hard to be clever.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Well intentioned on every level, the movie is successful only on some, and it falls flat when trying to visualize the innards of the poem itself.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Hunter becomes turgid with corporate conspiracies, hired assassins, and offscreen tragedies, and the appealing leanness of the early scenes gets lost.
  4. As Changeling strains toward its mawkishly optimistic conclusion, the old-fashioned moviemaking that Eastwood settled into doesn't suit either him or his star. It feels like a corny joke.
  5. First-time director Nick Ryan isn’t entirely up to the challenge in The Summit, but he does deliver some dramatic and visual highs in the attempt.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    This is no corporate project made to squeeze a few more dollars from a fading cash cow. No one else has been asking for another "Rocky," other than maybe Burt Young . No, this is a rarer beast -- an auteur sequel -- and it's so wrapped up in its maker's personal mythology and psychic needs that it becomes a hall of mirrors to which we're given a slack-jawed ringside seat.
  6. The film is slow going with its mix of stilted political discourse and restless village folk just looking to celebrate life and dance. At times, it’s like “Footloose” gone didactic.
  7. It's polished-looking, yet dull.
  8. It's an exercise in 1970s mood. But all the film does is conjure, channel, and allude, until there's really no movie of Green's own for an audience to grab onto.
  9. This is an old man's movie, without an old man's experience. Despite McGinly's stated affection for Kreskin (the movie ends with a written appreciation of him), there's nothing personal about it. It's the movie equivalent of handing us a business card.
  10. Eden is "Once" after two kids and 10 years of marriage have sucked the music out of life.
  11. The movie has a dramatic thinness, breezy tone, and unconvincing happy-ish ending that make it feel more inconsequential than anything about killers and imperiled children probably should.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film itself suggests a sketch video on Ferrell and McKay's "Funny or Die" website, padded out to the dimensions of a character comedy.
  12. It's the men in ''Upside" who speak all the truth.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Shallow and proud of it, an antic cartoon that lacks the comic inspiration to go the distance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The first Guy Maddin movie that feels as if it got only halfway out of the director's head and onto the screen.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Youth recedes, the body decays, life is a compromised thing: These are truths. But they're not fresh truths, and Moss's riverdogs are hardly the first to have discovered them.
  13. Hollywoodland has scraps of old movie glamour. It also has shades of later movies that sullied all that class and refinement with a lurid touch, namely Roman Polanski's "Chinatown." But that's all Hollywoodland is: scraps and shade.
  14. "Rear Window" never comes up in the Disturbia press notes, which is probably just as well since it steals that movie's premise but none of Alfred Hitchcock's wit, finesse, or seduction.
  15. The strength of Jacob's Ladder is that we never know what the next scene will be. But that's also its weakness. We don't feel involved with the characters here. We just feel jerked around. Jacob's Ladder, finally, is bummer theater. [2 Nov 1990, p.73]
    • Boston Globe
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Begin Again is pleasantly predictable if you’re in an undemanding mood. If you’re not, it’s unbearable, like hearing a treasured folk song given a Hot 97 makeover.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Genuine, artful simplicity may be an impossible quality in a modern children's movie, so Curious George opts instead for mayhem under a blanket of sweetness. The little ones understand.
  16. Predictable and not terribly clever, but among the slim pickings of movies geared to the pre-school and grade-school set, it could be much worse.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    They’re calling it a movie, but no matter how you squint at it it’s a TV show.
  17. The movie has a jolly, half-remembered quality, as though it were adapted from a particularly rose-colored memoir.

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