Boston Globe's Scores

For 6,065 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Beasts of the Southern Wild
Lowest review score: 0 The Devil Inside
Score distribution:
6065 movie reviews
  1. "Rear Window" never comes up in the Disturbia press notes, which is probably just as well since it steals that movie's premise but none of Alfred Hitchcock's wit, finesse, or seduction.
  2. The strength of Jacob's Ladder is that we never know what the next scene will be. But that's also its weakness. We don't feel involved with the characters here. We just feel jerked around. Jacob's Ladder, finally, is bummer theater. [2 Nov 1990, p.73]
    • Boston Globe
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Begin Again is pleasantly predictable if you’re in an undemanding mood. If you’re not, it’s unbearable, like hearing a treasured folk song given a Hot 97 makeover.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Genuine, artful simplicity may be an impossible quality in a modern children's movie, so Curious George opts instead for mayhem under a blanket of sweetness. The little ones understand.
  3. Predictable and not terribly clever, but among the slim pickings of movies geared to the pre-school and grade-school set, it could be much worse.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    They’re calling it a movie, but no matter how you squint at it it’s a TV show.
  4. The movie has a jolly, half-remembered quality, as though it were adapted from a particularly rose-colored memoir.
  5. Keep your big-budget horror movie expectations locked away in a separate crawl space, because this grainy feature debut from writer-director Ti West demands that you buy into the silliness, and the cheese.
  6. Janet McTeer provides a little ham to the role of a woman who dresses up her dogs because she misses her dead twin sons. But there's not nearly enough of her. Nor is there enough legitimate suspense.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A sweet, splattery bit of in-jokery; if it’s not actually a good movie, on some level you have to admire the chutzpah of a film set in 1850s Ireland but shot on Staten Island.
  7. Underneath its mea culpas lies a subtext that exonerates the post-Third Reich generations of its past.
  8. In balancing the more objective cultural history of delis with a personal profile, Anjou serves neither well. Perhaps he should have chosen one course or the other.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Story lines don't come any clammier.
  9. A film that begins with a train wreck and then, figuratively speaking, becomes one.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film's meta-fey title alone is an example of why some people adore Anderson and why he drives others absolutely crazy.
  10. A righteous but wrongheaded thriller, chokes on its well-meant outrage and leaves a moth-eaten plot and handful of nonsense characters on its way to a dopey finish.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    At one point in ''Praise,'' Godard mentions that the Bois de Boulogne, the Parisian park, is all that's left of the French forests from the time of the Roman conquest. In Praise of Love, glowing like an ember, is all that's left of genius.
  11. This sequel, ruled by the commercial imperative to not tamper with a highly profitable franchise, mostly just goes through the motions, essentially replicating the first outing. [19 Nov 1993, p.93]
    • Boston Globe
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's predictable fluff, sometimes pleasantly so, at others times irritatingly.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Ted Kotcheff's First Blood is a cute, slick anti-Vietnam war film carefully treated to go down for the pro-war constituency it's made for. [23 Oct 1982]
    • Boston Globe
  12. The film is overripe with erotic symbols.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Heavy metal, alt-pop, southern rock, orchestral swells, wailing Middle Eastern tunes all vie for our attention, but none of this noise drowns out the sound of good intentions twisting themselves into an impotent knot.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    At its occasional best, A Birder’s Guide to Everything hints at the profound pleasure of standing very still and witnessing wonders the rest of the world passes by.
  13. Though Mira shows skill at evoking mood and building tension despite the constrained circumstances of the premise, the narrative quickly and embarrassingly breaks down.
  14. Gordon made similar lurches all over the map in his previous exercise in grotesquerie, "Edmond," which was based on a David Mamet play and starred William H. Macy as, of all things, a racist misogynist on a grisly bender. Stuck could have used some of that outrageousness.
  15. Only occasionally do the thrill of the game and the passion of its players come together. That said, these guys' nakedly neurotic enthusiasm keeps the movie from being a total jumble.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Zemeckis and Hanks really seem to think they’re giving us a Christmas movie for the ages and a technology that will change cinema forever. They’re wrong on both counts. The Polar Express is merely a marvelous toy that has somehow become convinced it has a soul.
  16. An inconsequential high-school-reunion comedy that gets better when it stops trying to make you laugh.
  17. The Man with Two Brains has moments, but they aren't inspired. [04 Jun 1983]
    • Boston Globe
  18. At its best, it delves into the murky areas of memory, childhood trauma, and family conflict. But it forgoes such troubling issues for mumbo jumbo and glowing-eyed wraiths.

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