Boston Globe's Scores

For 5,034 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Sugar
Lowest review score: 0 From Justin to Kelly
Score distribution:
5,034 movie reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's a performance (Giamatti's) so nuanced and so real in its everyday pain that it doesn't stand a chance of winning an Oscar. But it should.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Yet what I felt when the lights came up at the end of this visionary, titanic, relentless experience was something different: a strange relief that it was, at last, over.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Carlos moves like a greyhound out of the gate, fleet and assured and focused on the business at hand. It's a subtle, ultimately staggering portrayal of a bloody-minded ideologue who convinced only himself.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    What happens between two people? Only the chemistry that keeps us from stumbling through the chaos by ourselves. Is that an illusion, too? Amour says it doesn't much matter. There is no dignity in life except love.
  1. Slly, sublime, buoyant mischief that is virtually without parallel in 20th-century art, much less 20th-century film.
  2. Watching it is a nonstop high.
  3. Freshly viewed, the movie's melancholy seems to fit uncannily well in the moment we find ourselves now. In the film there are mentions of nuclear annihilation and worries that heedless lust and wanton partying could bring Rome a second fall.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    As much as this tale of bent love runs in the ruts of its maker’s obsessions, it has an undertow that’s impossible to shake. [22 Nov. 2012]
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A transporting cinematic experience with a churl at its center, and how you feel about the movie may depend on how you feel about the churl.
  4. He even calls the majestic view from one of the hospital landings his Cinecittà, after the legendary Italian film studio. The movie is a Cinecittà of the mind.
  5. I was much more disheartened leaving the movie the first time I saw it than I was the second. Its richness resides in its apparent objectivity. Without sacrificing a sense of hope, Cantet suggests that the school system is just like a certain vexing grammatical tense: imperfect but still fighting against irrelevance.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The film that many consider the finest of its decade, Raging Bull, has aged well, and not just because it was filmed in black and white.
  6. I liked these characters, and suddenly not having them in my life anymore, simply because Denis has decided to start the closing credits, devastated me.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Remains worth seeing as an achingly nostalgic farewell to youthful idealism, tinged with a kind of loving contempt.
  7. There Will Be Blood" is anti-state of the art. It's the work of an analog filmmaker railing against an increasingly digitized world. In that sense, the movie is idiosyncratic, too: vintage visionary stuff.
  8. The film's look makes a divine accessory for its music, which Miles Davis composed. There's not even 20 minutes of it in the film, yet it still defines the atmosphere, transforming a crime yarn into a bebop noir.
  9. Not since the original ''Star Wars'' trilogy has film dipped into myth and emerged with the kind of weight and heft seen in Peter Jackson's first installment of J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s when Toy Story 3 becomes a jailbreak movie that it comes into its own.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It's worth stressing how deeply pleasurable Moolaad is to watch.
  10. Magically transports the viewer across time and space. As it does so, it becomes a humbling reminder of the universality of the human experience.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    All you really need to enjoy "Triplets" is a taste for the weird and the wonderful.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    For some of us, this constitutes a religious event.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    A subtle, often very funny, ultimately touching tragedy of royal manners and meaning.
  11. This is the first, smallest, and most essential planet in the Van Sant solar system. The seediness of "Drugstore Cowboy " started here. So did the one-way crushes in "My Own Private Idaho " and the gorgeously epic longueurs of "Last Days. "
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Stories We Tell is one of those movies you watch on a screen and replay in your head for days, moving between its many levels of inquiry and touched, always, by Polley’s compassion toward her relatives in particular and people in general.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 88 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    Waltz With Bashir not only breathes but it howls - and sobs and curses and croons and, in the end, when sound proves useless in the face of calamity, falls into awful silence.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    The Coens also understand the stark immediacy of this tale, and they visualize it with brilliantly judged details.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Reviewed by
      Ty Burr
    It’s about spycraft, but it goes to the source. If for no other reason, it deserves to be seen for arranging decades of events in the Middle East into a chronology that, to an outsider, makes dreadful sense.
  12. This is a world where people still put out wash to dry on fire escapes, watermelon has seeds, amusement park rides cost 9 cents. Joey is the little fugitive of the title, of course, but at the heart of the movie, as its makers could never have imagined 60 years ago, is a much bigger fugitive: time itself.
  13. It’s imperfect, but it’s daring, bold, and from a director who isn’t scared of anything.

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