Charlotte Observer's Scores

  • Movies
For 1,575 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Atonement
Lowest review score: 0 Waist Deep
Score distribution:
1575 movie reviews
  1. This is a game of numbers, not personalities, and a shrewd man wants the bigger numbers on his side when historians pick up their pens.
  2. Two things keep the film off Disney's top shelf. First, Naveen is a dull hero; his good-natured vanity isn't engaging until late in the story. Second, Newman's songs are less bland than usual but no more memorable.
  3. (Mendes') film debut shows he can shock not only with noise and nakedness but with subtle observations.
  4. It's a gentle look at people who cut themselves off from others and realize consequences too late. If Southern Baptists believed in karma, this would be their touchstone.
  5. The most sophisticated and satisfying ghost story on film since "The Sixth Sense."
  6. In rare cases – and The Woman in Black is one of them – a story may be more atmospheric when less is left to the imagination.
  7. You can't root for Ronnie. You can't identify with him. You can't hope he gets the girl – any girl. But you may want to look on with stunned fascination as he ticks away, ready to explode.
  8. Picks up steam from the ominous opening scene and ends as a quietly suspenseful thriller.
  9. The mountain, grim and unforgiving, remains the star.
  10. Li plays haughty, brilliant wushu master Huo Yuanjia, whose recklessness leads to tragedy after he becomes a champion at the end of the 19th century.
  11. The film offers an unusually rounded picture of a Latino family. All the men work, getting up early to do blue-collar jobs that demand dedication and responsible behavior. (We don't see much of them, but they have a strong presence in the household.)
  12. Most of the actors live their roles, and Fassbender (Rochester in the last "Jane Eyre") is superb as the wolflike, undisciplined assassin.
  13. Anyone who enjoys the novels of Ed McBain, the Oscar-winning "All the President's Men" or any televised variation of "CSI" will be at home here.
  14. To adapt it for a 130-minute movie, Irving ruthlessly cut away subplots, eliminated supporting characters and pared down the traits of the ones that remain.
  15. Turn a potentially unforgettable movie into a broad crowd-pleaser that sustains itself on three acting performances.
  16. Yi Yi is an intimate movie, for all its length and complexity.
  17. Gone Baby Gone would be an accomplishment with anyone at the helm; from a first-timer, it's a revelation.
  18. Doesn't reveal all its layers until you've taken the last bite.
  19. The film moves slowly, yet at exactly the right pace. Long holds on faces let us ponder what’s said and look for visual clues that it may be a lie.
  20. Trumping its predecessor with a tauter plot, a lower body count and just as many edge-of-the-seat jolts.
  21. My sentimentality meter never went off, and Smith proved what people have forgotten since his breakthroughs in "Where the Day Takes You" and "Six Degrees of Separation" 13 years ago: He's a serious actor.
  22. The film moves swiftly and unerringly to its conclusion. Spielberg remains under Stanley Kubrick's directorial spell.
  23. Portman doesn't catch fire until the second half, then heaves herself into emotional action; this suits her initially passive, mostly unthinking character. Weaving, who acts entirely with his voice, is V's ideal embodiment: witty, rueful, pitiless, visionary and mad.
  24. Balances brains, brawn and heart in ideal proportions. The actors - some first-rate, all enjoyable - never get overshadowed by the special effects, which dazzle us without gory excess.
  25. The most thoughtfully satisfying of the first six books.
  26. The longer film makes Donnie's intentions clearer, explains the time-travel theme better and also leaves us in no doubt as to Frank's identity.
  27. It comes from Pixar, the animation studio that scored with the "Toy Story" series and "A Bug's Life," and it has more zip and a tad less soul than those predecessors.
  28. Whedon wants to make a Serenity trilogy, and I suspect the actors will grow on me if he does. In this case, familiarity would breed not contempt but comfort.
  29. Hank Greenberg was to Jews what Jackie Robinson was to African Americans: a great athlete, handsome and hard-working, who took the first line of abuse from bigots and proved that his people belonged at the highest level of professional sports.
  30. Anton has a sad, gentle detachment that allows him to turn the other cheek literally through a series of slaps.

Top Trailers