Charlotte Observer's Scores

  • Movies
For 1,407 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Secret in Their Eyes
Lowest review score: 0 Little Nicky
Score distribution:
1,407 movie reviews
  1. Max
    Menno Meyjes' provocative film might be called an example of the haphazardness of evil.
  2. His (LaBute) observation of human nature is keener than before, his dialogue more attuned to ambiguities.
  3. Doesn't have the daring lunacy of "Chuck and Buck," the previous collaboration by director Miguel Arteta and writer Mike White. Yet it gets closer to the troubled, lonely soul of its main character.
  4. The film offers an unusually rounded picture of a Latino family. All the men work, getting up early to do blue-collar jobs that demand dedication and responsible behavior. (We don't see much of them, but they have a strong presence in the household.)
  5. Field does what most American directors don't: He shows people at work, in the day-to-day activity unmarked by excitement.
  6. Almodovar still populates his work with characters you'll see nowhere else in movies.
  7. Betty moves into Coen Brothers territory, a land so unreal that horrific behavior wrings laughter from a disbelieving audience.
  8. Balances brains, brawn and heart in ideal proportions. The actors - some first-rate, all enjoyable - never get overshadowed by the special effects, which dazzle us without gory excess.
  9. The film's full of in-jokes, from the Spanish-language billboards to the name of Banderas' character.
  10. This superficial plot, almost devoid of characterization or weighty emotions, is an excuse for ferocious, fast and frequent combat.
  11. Can there be higher praise for a motion picture designed to capture a beloved book with fidelity, thoroughness and affection? Only this: They made it better.
  12. (Cusack) has never been more effective onscreen.
  13. The final drum-off (c'mon, you knew it would come down to that) resembles a combination of music, gymnastics and martial arts, and I don't think I've seen a more pulse-pounding scene this year.
  14. The saga regains its grandeur with a complicated but easy-to-follow story. The characters are as satisfying as the effects.
  15. A follow-up with as much artistic integrity, complexity, humor and well-designed action as the original.
  16. The film moves swiftly and unerringly to its conclusion. Spielberg remains under Stanley Kubrick's directorial spell.
  17. Though the writing isn't always specific, Williams is. He differentiates between the murderer in "Insomnia," who wants a cop to understand his motives, and Sy, who realizes no one ever could.
  18. He's (Soderbergh) among the few directors working today who makes me wonder what he'll do next - and draws me into the movie house, whatever it may be.
  19. One of those rare thrillers where the cops aren't fools, villains don't turn stupid at crucial moments, and career assassins seldom miss targets.
  20. Less gloriously showy than "Memento," but it proves you can still craft fine art under the auspices of a big studio.
  21. Gandolfini's fans expect something quirky whenever he shows up, and they'll get what they've bargained for.
  22. The picture shatters all genre conventions.
  23. Howard has never been so grown-up in his handling of tough themes or so inventive in depicting states of mind. Goldsman has never been so down-to-earth or created so touching a character.
  24. Salva's view of the universe is bleak, but he communicates it with scary sincerity.
  25. (Mendes') film debut shows he can shock not only with noise and nakedness but with subtle observations.
  26. If you're tired of false holiday cheer, Lilya 4-Ever will provide a corrective to the spiritual eggnog force-fed to us all season. The climax takes place during Christmas, though one that would make Tiny Tim grateful for his crutch and cold chimney corner.
  27. It's possible to groan, chuckle, wince and be moist-eyed, sometimes in a span of seven or eight minutes.
  28. Plays out like a sprinter competing in his first distance race: It bursts forth with tremendous energy, sustains itself for quite a while, loses steam near the end but finishes ahead of most of the pack.
  29. The terrific Spellbound really isn't about the ability to tear words apart letter by letter. It's about nerve-wracking competitiveness.
  30. A richly satisfying adaptation of Louis Sachar's novel.

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