Chicago Sun-Times' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 4,794 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 JFK
Lowest review score: 0 The Life of David Gale
Score distribution:
4,794 movie reviews
  1. The 1975 movie tilted toward horror instead of comedy. Now here's a version that tilts the other way, and I like it a little better.
  2. The movie has a certain mordant humor, and some macho dialogue that's funny. Woods manfully keeps a straight face through goofy situations where many another actor would have signaled us with a wink. But the movie is not scary, and the plot is just one gory showdown after another.
  3. The original "Carrie'' worked because it was a skillful teenage drama grafted onto a horror ending. Also, of course, because De Palma and his star, Sissy Spacek, made the story convincing. The Rage: Carrie 2 is more like a shadow.
  4. Servillo charms in his dual turn, then takes it up a notch when one brother shows off his childhood knack for impersonating his look-alike.
  5. It’s a romantic comedy with all sorts of possibilities that instead relies on heavy-handed sight gags and over-the-top performances.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Reincarnated seems more interested in showing us countless scenes of people smoking herb than in giving us details about the making of the album it purports to be documenting. Granted, Snoop is immersing himself in a culture where this is a customary process, but it gets old and tired very quickly.
  6. A movie about two old codgers who are nothing like people, both suffering from cancer that is nothing like cancer, and setting off on adventures that are nothing like possible.
  7. This is a deliberately off-kilter, cheerfully violent, hit-and-miss effort with just enough moments of inspiration to warrant a recommendation — especially if you know what you’re getting into.
  8. The movie wants to be good-hearted but is somehow sort of grudging. It should have gone all the way. I think Fred Claus should have been meaner if he was going to be funnier, and Santa should have been up to something nefarious, instead of the jolly old ho-ho-ho routine.
  9. I hasten to say this is not criticism of John Travolta. He succeeds in this movie by essentially acting in a movie of his own.
  10. An assault on the eyes, the ears, the brain, common sense and the human desire to be entertained.
  11. It's so impossible to care about the characters in the movie that I didn't care if the vampires or werewolves won. I might not have cared in a better movie, either, but I might have been willing to pretend.
  12. It's got cheesy special effects, a muddy visual look, and characters who say obvious things in obvious ways.
  13. Slocombe may not carve up his kin for Cold Turkey, but he serves a wry repast.
  14. A visually ugly film with an incoherent plot, wooden characters and inane dialog. It provided me with one of the more unpleasant experiences I've had at the movies.
  15. Maybe the dingo ate their screenplay.
  16. Despite the fine performance by Witherspoon and a number of the supporting players, Devil’s Knot comes across as a cinematic, slightly dramatized Cliffs Notes edition of a story that’s been told often, and almost always more effectively, in other formats.
  17. It’s not a game anymore. In 1957, these kids were playing. And it was a perfect game.
  18. A few loopholes I can forgive. But when a plot is riddled with them -- I get distracted.
  19. Oh, did I dislike this film. It made me squirm. Its premise is lame, its plot relentlessly predictable, its characters with personalities that would distinguish picture books.
  20. Without a doubt the best film we are ever likely to see on the subject - unless there is a sequel, which is unlikely, because at the end, the Lincolns are on their way to the theater.
  21. You want a good horror film about a child from hell, you got one. Do not, under any circumstances, take children to see it. Take my word on this.
  22. Look at the performances. They're surprisingly good, and I especially admired the work of Monica Potter and Tony Goldwyn as the parents of one of two girls who go walking in the woods.
  23. The philosopher Thomas Hobbes tells us life can be "poor, nasty, brutish and short." So is this movie.
  24. Take Me Home Tonight must have been made with people who had a great deal of nostalgia for the 1980s, a relatively unsung decade. More power to them. The movie unfortunately gives them no dialogue expanding them into recognizable human beings.
  25. The surprise for me is Christina Ricci, who I think of as undernourished and nervous, but who flowers here in warm ripeness.
  26. It's a high-gloss version of a Hong Kong action picture, made in America but observing the exuberance of a genre where surfaces are everything.
  27. A turgid melodrama with the emotional range of a sympathy card.
  28. First-time feature director Dante Ariola (working from a script by Becky Johnson) has a good feel for these characters and keeps things moving along at a brisk pace.
  29. Not all of it works, but you play along, because it's rare to find a film this ambitious.

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