Chicago Sun-Times' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,151 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Tsotsi
Lowest review score: 0 Mother's Day
Score distribution:
5151 movie reviews
  1. There is mostly sadness and regret at the surface in 4 Little Girls, but there is anger in the depths, as there should be.
  2. Forget about the plot, the characters, the intrigue, which are all splendid in House of Flying Daggers, and focus just on the visuals.
  3. Like all good directors who make films about their own obsessions, Petri transmits an obsessive feeling in the film itself. "Investigation of a Citizen" is stylistically disconnected, but it works because it is absolutely fascinated with the nature of the inspector.
  4. Man on Wire is about the vanquishing of the towers by bravery and joy, not by terrorism.
  5. The splendid cast embodies the characters so fully that the events actually seem to be happening to them, instead of unfolding from a screenplay.
  6. Painful family issues are more likely to stay beneath the surface, known to everyone but not spoken of. Still Walking, a magnificent new film from Japan, is very wise about that, and very true.
  7. Very nice. I like Borat very much. I think it is, as everybody has been saying, the funniest movie in years.
  8. It’s the beautiful and breathtaking animation that gives The Tale of the Princess Kaguya a luster that is both simple and sophisticated. Once again the visionary Takahata and Studio Ghibli prove that great animation is not just for kids, but can be universal in its reach.
  9. Son of Saul is lasting work of art — difficult to watch, impossible to forget.
  10. Who is Charles Ferguson, director of this film? A one-time senior fellow of the Brookings Institute, software millionaire, originally a supporter of the war, visiting professor at MIT and Berkeley, he was trustworthy enough to inspire confidences from former top officials.
  11. Wherever you live, when this film opens, it will be the best film in town.
  12. Starting with Mick Jagger, rock concerts have become, for the performers, as much sporting events as musical and theatrical performances. Stop Making Sense understands that with great exuberance.
  13. Working from a script by Paul Webb and aided by stark, beautiful, sometimes startlingly realistic cinematography by Bradford Young, DuVernay has delivered a powerful and moving portrait of Martin Luther King Jr.
  14. Here is one of the most entertaining films in many a moon, a film that charms because of its story, its performances and because of the sly way it plays with being silent and black and white.
  15. It is one of those rare movies that is not just about a story, or some characters, but about a whole universe of feeling.
  16. No finer film has ever been made about organized crime - not even "The Godfather."
  17. Despite jumping through the deliberately disorienting hoops of its story, Eternal Sunshine has an emotional center, and that's what makes it work.
  18. Fantastically powerful despite its flaws. (Review of Original Release)
  19. It looks fabulous, it uses special effects to create a new world of its own, but it is thin in its human story.
  20. Once is the kind of film I've been pestered about ever since I started reviewing again. People couldn't quite describe it, but they said I had to see it. I had to. Well, I did. They were right.
  21. The music probably sounds fine on a CD. Certainly it is well-rehearsed. But the overall sense of the film is of good riddance to a bad time.
  22. I wanted to hug this movie. It takes such a risky journey and never steps wrong. It creates specific, original, believable, lovable characters, and meanders with them through their inconsolable days, never losing its sense of humor.
  23. Perhaps it is not supposed to be clear; perhaps the movie's air of confusion is part of its paranoid vision. There are individual moments that create sharp images (shock troops drilling through a ceiling, De Niro wrestling with the almost obscene wiring and tubing inside a wall, the movie's obsession with bizarre duct work), but there seems to be no sure hand at the controls.
  24. One of those movies where "after that summer, nothing would ever be the same again." Yes, but it redefines "nothing."
  25. Philip Seymour Hoffman's precise, uncanny performance as Capote doesn't imitate the author so much as channel him, as a man whose peculiarities mask great intelligence and deep wounds.
  26. I swear to you that if you live in a place where this film is playing, it is the best film in town.
  27. The music is brilliant, Chazelle’s writing and directing are something to behold, Teller is really good — and Simmons delivers one of the most memorable performances of the year.
  28. Unlike "Saving Private Ryan" and other dramatizations based on D-Day, Overlord is an intimate film, one that focuses closely on Tom Beddoes (Brian Stirner), who enters the British army, goes through basic training and is one of the first ashore on D-Day. (Reviewed in 2004)
  29. It’s quintessential Anderson... but also an unabashed entertainment. And that’s something to see.
  30. This saga of romance works with an unromantic style.

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