Chicago Sun-Times' Scores

For 804 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Deadwood: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Dirty Sexy Money: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 553
  2. Negative: 0 out of 553
553 tv reviews
  1. At 208 minutes, Scorsese has accomplished the best documentary that is probably possible.
  2. The absurdity of an omniscient sophisticate still in short pants carries plenty of comedic potential.
  3. Co-creators Joe and Tony Gayton have turned out a solid series that got stronger with each of the five episodes I watched.
  4. [A] weekly fix of justice and resolution while the overarching--and more intriguing--story line of McDeere's plight slowly unfolds.
  5. Alcatraz sure is [fun].
  6. The mythology is intriguing and so are the characters, who are as full of witty one-liners as their closets are bursting with black leather.
  7. Overall, the first episode delivers a suspenseful ride around the world, peppered with some tear-jerking moments.
  8. Luck can be maddeningly inscrutable but it becomes less so over time.
  9. The stereotypes slow down in subsequent episodes, which grew more entertaining with each of the four I watched.
  10. Despite this highly unoriginal setup, NBC's midseason rom-com Bent has its charms--most of which come from the laid-back, likable lothario Pete.
  11. The series is highly relatable and, at times, pretty funny.
  12. Soapy melodrama aside, Titanic does a fine job giving viewers a sense of what it was like to be aboard the doomed vessel.
  13. Don't Trust the B---- in Apartment 23 is a deliciously nasty comedy that takes a well-worn formula and whips it to life with clever writing and an engaging cast.
  14. The show chronicles the more humorous than glamorous challenges encountered by Meyer, whose full-time job us self-preservation.
  15. The show is a refreshing alternative to the typical diva docu-series, where overly cosmeticked prima donnas stir up drama in their perfectly appointed mansions.
  16. The well-executed drama is a welcome addition to the programming lineup for a network better known for non-scripted series like "Swamp People" and "Pawn Stars."
  17. While politics come into play later, it is human emotions such as grief, regret and loss that fans can look forward to sinking their teeth into at the start of the season.
  18. While the latest interpretation doesn't live up to the British import, it's still more entertaining than your typical CBS procedural.
  19. This ranks among the best new comedies of the season.
  20. What Vegas lacks in the whodunit department it makes up for with the bigger narrative about a town up for grabs and the two men vying to get their hands on it.
  21. It's another welcome helping of "New Girl" adorkability.
  22. Toss in some sex and Southern-style politics, and you've got plenty to sing about.
  23. This slick action-drama is based on the comic book superhero Green Arrow. Prepare to quiver.
  24. The Dust Bowl is more like eat-your-vegetables television than some of Burns' other endeavors, namely his last PBS documentary, "Prohibition." But it's still a worthwhile examination of an overlooked chapter from our past that holds plenty of lessons for our future.
  25. Despite cable's relaxed standards for nudity and swearing, as well as the addition of new showrunner Ric Swartzlander ("Gary Unmarried"), Cougar Town still feels like the same old show--a very good show at that.
  26. The 13-episode Legit fits right in at the male-skewing cable network known for pushing the envelope with edgier, unconventional fare.
  27. The story isn't brilliant or all that sophisticated, but the scripts are stocked with enough clever twists and turns to keep you guessing.
  28. David Duchovny from "Red Shoe Diaries," "Twin Peaks" and the current film "Kalifornia" combines an off-center earnestness with a weird sense of humor to make Mulder likable and convincing. As Scully, Gillian Anderson provides a cool, logical counterpart for Spooky. It's a perfectly balanced pairing, with only a hint of sexual tension. [10 Sept 1993, p.61]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  29. Like the kids it's about, this show deserves a better fate, however. (Saturday night at 7? Come on, NBC.) It's a dry-eyed but ultimately sweet program, and if you're home alone on a date night, it's for you. [24 Sept 1999, p.48]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  30. The key here is that the emotional payoffs are dead-on. [20 Sept 1999, p.38]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  31. With its stylized violence, pop-culture jokes and self-mocking attitude, Buffy deserves positive comparisons to Wes Craven's "Scream." [10 Mar 1997, p.33]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  32. The mysteries may not be all that mysterious and the music all but clubs you at times, but there's something about Morris' performance that holds the thing together. [26 Sept 2003, p.53]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  33. The clever series, from the creators of HBO's "Dream On", stars an appealing group of actors who are just a bit funnier and better-looking than your average friend. [22 Sept 1994, p.43]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  34. Warning: This is not "Cheers II." With the morose Crane as the central character, the Frasier spinoff reflects the gloomy, occasionally pompous personality of the guilt-burdened shrink and the star who plays him. The humor is moody and cerebral, like the chilly Grammer. But that's not bad - especially in this season of warm and gooey domestic sitcoms. [16 Sept 1993, p.43]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  35. As realistic a series as you're bound to see in which a beautiful, smart, athletic and resourceful young woman moonlights for an ultrasecret wing of the Central Intelligence Agency in between her grad school studies. [28 Sept 2001, p.48]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  36. Sumptuously shot and full of period detail, Mr. Selfridge is stocked with plenty of upstairs/downstairs drama, often with a little too much attention being lavished on the workers’ personal storylines.
  37. Parker projects a saucy style, but her Carrie character comes across as an arrogant skeptic with an I-don't-really-care attitude. She avoids emotional risks. Despite her rampant curiosity and calculated posing, Carrie prefers to keep her distance as a journalist. [4 June 1998, p.43]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  38. All of this starts a bit slowly. It's not certain at first how much you should and can care about any of these people. But the eight-episode series and the characters grow on you with each week, and it turns out they have more depth than they initially let on -- or even know themselves. [16 July 2004, p.47]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  39. One of the better new series this fall despite a habit of turning mawkish in the last five minutes each week. It's helped immensely by its very endearing characters. [22 Sept 1998, p.41]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  40. McKenzie is a revelation and, backed by an able cast, he is what salvages this music-infused, glossy soap from slick filmmakers Doug Liman and McG. [5 Aug 2003, p.39]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  41. It’s an educational, entertaining, warts-and-all look at something that deserves our better understanding.
  42. The new version isn't as painfully, profoundly funny as the original. But that's as it should be. American audiences don't necessarily want to cringe when they sit down for a sitcom. This is why "Curb Your Enthusiasm" is a cult hit, and not a hit hit. [23 Mar 2005, p.59]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  43. It’s the broader story of Briggs--is his hat white or black?--and his unfolding relationship Warren that elevates Graceland a cut above your dime-a-dozen crime dramas.
  44. [This] energized combination of wish fulfillment and streamlined storytelling set for is eminently watchable -- and it will continue to be so long as the troubling, too-literal white knight vs. black hats motif in the opener goes away in later episodes. [6 Oct 2000, p.55]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  45. But those looking for a "Larry Sanders"-like view into Midler's world, or even a "Seinfeld"-like simplification of it, are going to be disappointed. This is more like "I Love Lucy" with Midler channeling both Lucy and Ricky. [11 Oct 2000, p.67]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  46. I'll cautiously recommend the series because I have faith in the talents of Kelley, Skerritt and Baker. [18 Sept 1992, p.63]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  47. Goofy and good-hearted, '3rd Rock' winks at the human condition. [8 Jan 1996]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  48. Probably isn't for everyone, but surely more than a few viewers will identify with the misfits of all backgrounds and (judging from the presence of Loudon Wainwright as father to Steven Karp, the series' central character played by Jay Baruchel) ages thrown together in an anxious environment of self-discovery and perhaps too much freedom. [25 Sept 2001, p.47]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  49. Pacing is brisk. The mood, generally eerie. The special effects--a fruit truck smashing accordion-style into a clear wall--don’t disappoint. It’s basically the television version of an entertaining beach read.
  50. A success in that it exceeds expectations. It sets up the challenging premise that God -- in the personage of a hunky classmate, a cafeteria worker or who knows what -- might ask us to do things for reasons we can't immediately comprehend, and successfully straddles the razor-thin line between sacrilege and sacred. [26 Sept 2003, p.53]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  51. Compelling... While "The Apprentice" is not without its humor as the budding entrepreneurs inevitably stumble and jostle for position, this is a show that runs counter to the current trend in reality TV in which the wealthy are ridiculed. Instead, it shows the hard work and innovation required to become rich. [7 Jan 2004]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  52. Entertaining, addicting and curiously familiar. [28 Jun 1995]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  53. "Will & Grace" so far is sophisticated and funny. [21 Sep 1998]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  54. The Bridge, which gets better with each of the first three episodes, ventures beyond a singular quest for a serial killer. Other intriguing storylines and characters are given ample attention.
  55. "Weeds" comes from a Hollywood la-la land that is too crammed with trauma and wit to be real. But it's just entertaining enough to be watchable, despite the fact that it doesn't seem to be going anywhere dramatically deep. [4 Aug 2005]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  56. The new episodes find the upper-middle-class mother of two evolving into a gangster. This is a good move for the show. [13 Aug 2007]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  57. While the tendency might be to overpraise this oddball but smart and keenly observed family comedy about the ordinary life of an extraordinary child simply because it arrives square in the middle of a TV season in which most TV comedies have been simply awful, it is nonetheless one of the better shows to come down the pike. [6 Jan 2000]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  58. Unlike "L.A. Law," which presented its stars as invincible courtroom warriors, Kelley's "Practice" emphasizes the gritty details and strange maneuvers that lead to out-of-court settlements and quick Friday verdicts. [4 Mar 1997]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  59. Taking the sitcom-shrink genre beyond "Frasier" and "The Bob Newhart Show," Comedy Central's "Dr. Katz" enters the hip, surreal realm of "The Simpsons." [27 May 1995]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  60. "No Flights, No Tights" is the mantra among the series' writers and producers, emphasizing that this show is set long before the orphan of Krypton becomes a full-fledged superhero. [16 Oct 2001, p.43]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  61. You've seen this kind of shtick before on other shows, but Cohen occasionally gets off a laugh-out-loud moment. [21 Feb 2003, p.45]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  62. The talented comedic ensemble makes the most of the strong material from “Parks & Recreation” vets Dan Goor and Mike Schur.
  63. It could be the fall’s best new drama if it doesn’t veer off course and drive into the ditches of hokey predictability or outrageous implausibility.
  64. A powerful, engrossing yet sometimes hard to watch six-hour elegy. [14 Apr 2000, p.39]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  65. The show’s pricey-looking pilot caters to both comic book geeks and mainstream viewers with its witty writing and special effects.
  66. The storyline is more tightly focused than last year’s see-what-sticks approach. But it also feels like it’s pandering a bit to a younger CW crowd.
  67. It’s required viewing for fanboys. But it also holds broader appeal for anyone curious about the evolution of the comic book genre, its good and bad guys, and its lasting legacy.
  68. The show has a lot going on and it isn’t always easy to follow, but for the most part it’s stylish, sexy and smart.
  69. Rob Lowe does a respectable turn as JFK... [But] It’s the lesser-known story of Lee Harvey Oswald, expertly played with simmering anger by Will Rothhaar, that’s most interesting.
  70. Karl Urban is the main draw as an emotionally and physically damaged detective in Fox’s sci-fi police procedural with a heavy “Fringe” pedigree.
  71. Get ready to laugh and cry with this touching new comedy about a dysfunctional team of nurses and doctors caring for aging patients in a hospital’s extended-care wing.
  72. Few comics could get away with such an irreverent act, but Silverman pulls it off with her disconnected style that blends vulgarity and vulnerability.
  73. The film noir touches are laid on a bit thick, but that’s also part of the appeal of this stylish limited series.
  74. Clever dialogue and an unmistakable sense of place still make the show worth watching, even when the narrative is spinning its wheels.
  75. The Spoils of Babylon is a star-studded, droll spoof of television miniseries from the ’80s.
  76. The Dick Wolf-produced drama is darker than its sister show, but it packs potential for fun with the city’s cops and firefighters crossing paths both on and off the job.
  77. The Geoff Stults-led comedy has a heart that could beat stronger if the stereotypes get dialed down.
  78. It’s a fun, entertaining spin on the legal procedural and an ideal showcase for Kinnear’s rakish charm.
  79. A winsome opportunist (Luke Arnold), a ruthless captain (Toby Stephens) and a tough-talking tavern owner (Hannah New) are just a few of the colorful characters involved in a brutal power grab in the 18th century Bahamas.
  80. Christina Ricci does a haunting turn as notorious hatchet swinger Lizzie Borden.
  81. Oddly compelling even though it's not nearly as edgy and smart as it thinks it is. [5 Nov 2004, p.51]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It's not about politics, and it's not (only) about gag lines. It's a mostly honest attempt to explore the human condition through a subculture where sex is upfront and serves as lens and entree into other issues of love, death, friendship and life itself. [30 Nov 2000, p.43]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  82. An eccentric kid (Benjamin Stockham, “1600 Penn”) looking for a father figure finds one in his man-child neighbor, Will, played with the right amount of humor and heart by David Walton (“Bent”).
  83. It’s an interesting conceit rooted in real behavioral science.
  84. What the 10-episode series lacks in originality it makes up for by piling on the creepy suspense.
  85. The patchwork narrative covers Chicago’s murder epidemic, gang violence, public schools crisis, sports stuff--all familiar stories. But they’re packaged in an engaging, informative way.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It doesn't always feel realistic, but it works on its own terms: What happens in Las Vegas stays in "Las Vegas." [22 Sept 2003, p.42]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  86. There’s an acerbic charm to Fox’s 1991-set sitcom that elevates it above similar newcomers “Growing Up Fisher” and “The Goldbergs.”
  87. Beneath these sometimes confusing layers lurks a promising show about a relatively unexplored chapter in U.S. military history.
  88. It’s a cinematic story whose focus isn’t polar bears and receding glaciers.
  89. They’ve basically taken that premise [of NBC's “Best Friends Forever”], switched up some of the details and reinvented that show for a new network, which isn’t a bad thing because the original concept was pretty humorous, and Parham and St. Clair play great besties.
  90. Wilson's charisma should attract viewers. [13 Jan 1997, p.31]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  91. Lucas has created an exhilarating history lesson - something you won't find anywhere else on the tube. In The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, modern moviemaking know-how meets that wonderfully old-fashioned notion that nothing is more entertaining than the clash of ideas. [4 Mar 1992, p.39]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  92. The action unfurls a mere 30 years ago, but it may as well be the Dark Ages when viewed through today’s technology-dependent lens. That’s a big part of what makes the show such fun.
  93. A captivating actress known for offbeat comic roles in "Designing Women," "Love & War" and "Texasville," Potts forcefully redefines the character of inspirational teacher Louanne Johnson in ABC's improved version of Dangerous Minds. [30 Sept 1996, p.39]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  94. Biehn's terse, tightly coiled performance and stirring music from Elmer Bernstein's original 1960 score enhance the "Magnificent" mystique. [2 Jan 1998]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  95. Combines explosive, stylized violence with stinging social commentary and surgical strokes of sharp media satire. [17 Mar 1994]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  96. There's nothing wrong with sex, but much of it seems gratuitous here, thrown in not because it's required to tell the story but to needlessly indulge in the freedom that pay cable affords. It detracts from the heartwarming story rather than embellishes it, pandering to viewers as if the people at Showtime feared no one would watch unless there were at least a few "booty call" references. [28 Jun 2000]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  97. Platinum... may not be great but already is better and more ambitious than most of what UPN has to offer and has ever offered. [14 Apr 2003]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  98. An intriguing study in how regular Joes react to inexplicable events, the show demands a level of patience bound to result in its own “Sudden Departure” of at least some viewers.

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