Chicago Sun-Times' Scores

For 716 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 In Treatment: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 The War at Home: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 501
  2. Negative: 0 out of 501
501 tv reviews
  1. The premise is intriguing, although it's difficult to watch without backseat driving.
  2. There's just nothing else on TV with this level of jubilant satire.
  3. Hot in Cleveland is formulaic, but has tremendous good will on its side.
  4. It's hard to say how the series will play out because by the end of the first episode Mom has declared that the family is going straight. In this, I hope they fail.
  5. If you're looking for a new cop drama to serve and protect your entertainment interests, leave the rookies alone to ripen, and go for a ride-along with Jason Lee's Dwight. Blue suede shoes not required.
  6. If "Seinfeld" had an absurdist, bitter brother, it would be Louie. Denis Leary and Louis C.K. may not deserve our sympathy, but they've earned the laughs.
  7. The show promises to raise a number of real issues, from race relations to gay marriage. You probably wouldn't vote these women into political office, but they do seem to be above hair weave-pulling. Good for you? I wouldn't go that far. But despite its best efforts, "Real Housewives of D.C." is educational TV.
  8. These reality vets are pros. No awkward small talk necessary--they know what's expected of them, and they jump right in. Things are complicated by boyfriends back home, but not all that much.
  9. The cheerleader drama Hellcats isn't nearly in such danger of taking itself seriously. A brunet Ashley Tisdale makes a speech about how cheerleaders are athletes who deserve respect, and then we get to move on to the triple handsprings in crop tops.
  10. Belushi and O'Connell are fun to watch, and--spoiler!--it turns out they're real sweethearts, too.
  11. There's no skimping on the sordid and blunt evidence, but the cases are absorbing. And unlike "Law & Order," which had a way of leaving us hanging, we do learn the "whole truth" by the end of each episode. You can't put a price on closure.
  12. The ingredients for eye-rolling failure are all here: Sample dialogue: "Your superiors say that you're the best they've ever seen"; foreign terrorists for bad guys; one female team member who makes Maggie Q from "Nikita" look like a prissy hack, and, oh, yes--it's an election year. But Hawaii Five-O works, and for one reason: Scott Caan, who is the second coming of cool.
  13. Running Wilde never reaches the same level of genius [as "Arrested Development"], but maybe that's because we have Puddle narrating the action, not Ron Howard. You can't re-create the magic--but I like that they're trying.
  14. The cast and the writing are solid, and I think we can assume there's wisdom ahead. It's definitely a family that could grow on you. But I wouldn't go so far as to marry into it.
  15. It doesn't sound great on paper: A documentary film crew interviewed a "Breakfast Club"-type group of high school seniors, and now is revisiting them to see how their lives have changed in the 10 years since. It would be interesting if it were real; it's not. Nonetheless, I got drawn into the 3 star drama--because, believe me, these kids have changed.
  16. If anyone has the potential to be the next "Hart to Hart," it's Boris Kodjoe and Gugu Mbatha-Raw....It's co-created by J.J. Abrams ("Alias"), so expect plenty of fast action, fun and costume changes
  17. So far, Law & Order: Los Angeles is balmy balm for fans feeling burned by the original. Long may it air.
  18. The acting is brilliant, the problems are relatable, and the truths Dr. Weston is chasing are profound. On the other hand, In Treatment is the epitome of American self-indulgence, both for the actors and the characters they're playing.
  19. Overall, I don't have too many complaints. But if you're a fan of the fantasy "Real World" houses, I should warn that you'll be disappointed. The aesthetic highlight here is blue Astroturf.
  20. Either you'll jump right in or you'll give up immediately. I think it's about time a drama embraces a super power that's long been forgotten: showmanship.
  21. As with any fast food, the bulk of Bob's Burgers is pleasant filler. You'll probably be too tired to switch the channel after "The Simpsons," so you might as well lay there and enjoy it.
  22. The episode feels contrived, as the characters are introduced and try too hard to prove their anarchic cool. The next three episodes, though, are surprisingly thoughtful and even a little punk poetic.
  23. Both "Skins" and Being Human are about outcasts who form their own families together, muddling through the present even though the future doesn't look too bright. The characters may all be extreme, but you'll identify with them all.
  24. If you've hit your David E. Kelley lawyer limit, Fairly Legal might be the dramatic departure you need. Give peace a chance.
  25. Kelley's trademark whimsy feels awfully forced at this point, and Bates comes across as stiff and depressed (although that could have to do with her injuries).
  26. Perfect Couples is almost there; "Better With You" is almost there. Maybe if the shows conjoined, the chemistry would be right.
  27. The first episode's a little stiff as the guys mark their territory, but by the fourth the show feels sweatpants-comfortable.
  28. Criminal Minds: Suspect Behavior is a solid addition to your evening lineup.
  29. Panettiere takes a tricky role and does it, at least, some justice.
  30. You can always count on Gary Busey to bring the crazy, whether he's playing himself on "Entourage" or stumbling through "Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew." The man is a treasure. Casting Busey is so easy it's practically cheating.