Chicago Sun-Times' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 4,671 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 75% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 23% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 A Most Violent Year
Lowest review score: 0 Wolf Creek
Score distribution:
4,671 movie reviews
  1. As for Shaquille O'Neal, given his own three wishes the next time, he should go for a script, a director and an interesting character.
  2. The Jackal, on the other hand, impressed me with its absurdity. There was scarcely a second I could take seriously.
  3. I seem to be developing a rule about talking animals: They can talk if they're cartoons or Muppets, but not if they're real.
  4. A dull collection of unlikable, paper-thin characters, all of them stuck in a story that has nowhere interesting to go.
  5. A classic species of bore: a self-referential movie with no self to refer to. One character after another, one scene after another, one cute line of dialogue after another, refers to another movie, a similar character, a contrasting image, or whatever.
  6. The plot was an arbitrary concoction.
  7. "Clerks" spoke with the sure, clear voice of an original filmmaker. In Mallrats the voice is muffled, and we sense instead advice from the tired, the establishment, the timid and other familiar Hollywood executive types.
  8. The Flower of My Secret is likely to be disappointing to Almodovar's admirers, and inexplicable to anyone else.
  9. Everybody knew to wait for the outtakes during the closing credits, because you'd see him miss a fire escape or land wrong in the truck going under the bridge. Now the outtakes involve his use of the English language.
  10. The dialogue and exposition scenes in G.I. Joe are like something out of a Saturday morning cartoon from the 1980s, but the PG-13 violence is a little intense for the 7-year-old boys (and girls) who might love this stuff.
  11. Joe Dirt is so obviously a construction that it is impossible to find anything human about him; he is a concept, not a person.
  12. Everything about this film feels forced, clunky and overwrought.
  13. It's a nine days' wonder, a geek show designed to win a weekend or two at the box office and then fade from memory.
  14. The movie makes two mistakes: (1) It isn't very funny, and (2) it makes the crucial error of taking its story seriously and angling for a happy ending.
  15. A march through the swamp of recycled ugly duckling stories, with occasional pauses in the marsh of sitcom cliches and the bog of Idiot Plots.
  16. The film is a gloomy special-effects extravaganza filled with grotesque images, generating fear and despair.
  17. There must be humor here somewhere.
  18. A first draft for a movie that could have been extraordinary.
  19. It's unnecessary in the sense that there is no good reason to go and actually see it.
  20. A long slog through perplexities and complexities.
  21. It is not faulty logic that derails The Hills have Eyes, however, but faulty drama. The movie is a one-trick pony.
  22. Newsies is like warmed-over Horatio Alger, complete with such indispensable cliches as the newsboy on crutches, the little kid, and of course the hero's best pal, who has a pretty sister.
  23. Bootmen is the story of a young dancer and his friends who revisit the cliches of countless other dance movies in order to bring forth a dance performance of clanging unloveliness.
  24. So unsuccessful in so many different ways that maybe the whole project was doomed.
  25. It knows the words but not the music; while the Farrelly brothers got away with murder, The Sweetest Thing commits suicide.
  26. None of the action is coherent; shots and shells are fired, people and killed or not, explosions rend the air, SUVs spin aloft (the same one more than once, I think), and there is no sense of strategy.
  27. Another one of those road comedies where Southern roots are supposed to make boring people seem colorful. If these characters were from Minneapolis or Denver, no way anyone would make a film about them.
  28. There's no chemistry between Deeds and Babe, but then how could there be, considering that their characters have no existence, except as the puppets in scenes of plot manipulation.
  29. The movie stars Jim Carrey, who is in his pleasant mode. It would have helped if he were in his manic mode, although it's hard to get a rise out of a penguin.
  30. The movie is a paid holiday for its director, Harold Becker. I say this because I know what Becker is capable of.

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