Chicago Sun-Times' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,123 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Moonlight Mile
Lowest review score: 0 Slackers
Score distribution:
5123 movie reviews
  1. What a bold, mad act of genius it was, to make Lawrence of Arabia, or even think that it could be made.
  2. Bresson suggests that we are all Balthazars. Despite our dreams, hopes and best plans, the world will eventually do with us whatever it does.
  3. They are adults, for the most part outside organized religion, faced with situations in their own lives that require them to make moral choices. You shouldn’t watch the films all at once, but one at a time. Then if you are lucky and have someone to talk with, you discuss them, and learn about yourself. Or if you are alone, you discuss them with yourself, as so many of Kieslowski’s characters do.
  4. The wedding sequence... is a virtuoso stretch of filmmaking: Coppola brings his large cast onstage so artfully that we are drawn at once into the Godfather's world.
  5. The Leopard was written by the only man who could have written it, directed by the only man who could have directed it, and stars the only man who could have played its title character.
  6. Once in a great while I see a movie I know I’ll be listing as one of my all-time favorites for the rest of my days. So it is with this remarkable, unforgettable, elegant epic that is about one family — and millions of families. It’s a pinpoint-specific and yet universal story.
  7. This is the kind of film that makes you feel intensely alive while you're watching it, and sends you out into the streets afterwards eager to talk deeply and urgently, to the person you are with. Whoever that happens to be.
  8. The movie is astonishingly beautiful. The cinematography is by Bergman's longtime collaborator Sven Nykvist.
  9. One of the greatest of all American films, but has never received the attention it deserves because of its lack of the proper trappings. Many "great movies'' are by great directors, but Laughton directed only this one film, which was a critical and commercial failure long overshadowed by his acting career.
  10. Moonlight is gorgeous and yet bleak, uplifting and yet sobering, exhilarating but also grounded in some unshakable realities.
  11. This restored 35mm print, now in art theaters around the country, may be 37 years old, but it is the best foreign film of the year.
  12. One of the greatest of all fantasy films.
  13. A film like "Hoop Dreams" is what the movies are for. It takes us, shakes us, and make us think in new ways about the world around us. It gives us the impression of having touched life itself.
  14. Does what many great films do, creating a time, place and characters so striking that they become part of our arsenal of images for imagining the world.
  15. Starting with Le Petit Soldat, Godard was forging his own individualistic art and becoming the most relevant director of our time.
  16. This is a powerful film and a stark visual accomplishment, but no thanks to Gabita (Laura Vasiliu). The driving character is her roommate Otilia (Anamaria Marinca), who does all the heavy lifting.
  17. This is one of the funniest movies ever made. To see it now is to understand that. To see it for the first time in 1968, when I did, was to witness audacity so liberating that not even "There's Something About Mary" rivals it.
  18. Made with sublime innocence and breathtaking artistry, at a time when its simple values rang true.
  19. Ran
    Ran is a great, glorious achievement.
  20. Unflinchingly directed by Steve McQueen, led by Ejiofor’s magnificent work, 12 Years a Slave is what we talk about when we talk about greatness in film.
  21. This is one of the funniest films about coping with tragedy I’ve ever seen. Not that it’s a comedy, not for a second. It’s an immensely moving and beautifully resonant drama about the walking wounded and how they cope with a horrific event from many years past.
  22. Seen after 30 years, Dr. Strangelove seems remarkably fresh and undated - a clear-eyed, irreverant, dangerous satire. And its willingness to follow the situation to its logical conclusion - nuclear annihilation - has a purity that today's lily-livered happy-ending technicians would probably find a way around.
  23. This is clearly one of the best of the year's films. Every time an animated film is successful, you have to read all over again about how animation isn't "just for children" but "for the whole family," and "even for adults going on their own." No kidding!
  24. No movie has had a greater impact on the way people looked. The music of course is immortal.
  25. This is one of the most stunning visual treats of the year and one of the most unforgettable thrill rides in recent memory.
  26. Beauty and the Beast reaches back to an older and healthier Hollywood tradition in which the best writers, musicians and filmmakers are gathered for a project on the assumption that a family audience deserves great entertainment, too.
  27. Director Haynes has a knack for framing his characters with just the right touch. There are no throwaway shots in this film.
  28. A visionary roller-coaster ride of a movie.
  29. David Fincher's film has the rare quality of being not only as smart as its brilliant hero, but in the same way. It is cocksure, impatient, cold, exciting and instinctively perceptive.
  30. It may be a deeper film experience than many audiences can withstand: too cynical, too true, too cruel and too heartbreaking. It is about the Algerian war, but those not interested in Algeria may substitute another war; The Battle of Algiers has a universal frame of reference.

Top Trailers