Chicago Sun-Times' Scores

For 775 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 32% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Friday Night Lights: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 Dirty Sexy Money: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 535
  2. Negative: 0 out of 535
535 tv reviews
  1. The language and sentiments are often unfiltered and raw, maybe more than you want at times, but Leary is a master at playing guys on the edge and this is an extraordinary showcase, by turns moving, funny and stunning. [21 July 2004, p.61]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Everyone has to bring their A-game and, for the most part, they do.
  2. Dexter, one of the best shows on TV this decade. High praise, indeed. Deserved.
  3. The show’s pace is slow in spots, but the dark humor and twisted tone make it oddly compelling.
  4. It makes the most of its pay-TV platform by showing plenty of skin, but the sex scenes service a bigger story made all the more compelling by a couple of strong leads in Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan.
  5. Probably isn't for everyone, but surely more than a few viewers will identify with the misfits of all backgrounds and (judging from the presence of Loudon Wainwright as father to Steven Karp, the series' central character played by Jay Baruchel) ages thrown together in an anxious environment of self-discovery and perhaps too much freedom. [25 Sept 2001, p.47]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  6. The rest of the original crew is back, in varying degrees of denial, cluelessness, incompetence and narcissism. They have been missed.
  7. Based on the first three new episodes, I can continue to put Rescue Me on my list as one of the best 20 shows that have ever been on TV. [13 June 2007, p.51]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  8. It’s also an intimately personal tale of Kramer’s heartbreaking first-hand experience with the disease. Directed by Ryan Murphy, it’s bound to put Emmys in the hands of a remarkable cast.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Never mind the feminine religious cult Baltar falls into in this premiere. Add that to the clue-packed promotional photograph circulating of the BSG cast mimicking "The Last Supper," and what began as a deep, dark sci-fi drama seems to be turning into an anti-Arthur C. Clarke religious tract.
  9. The premiere lacks the gravitas of last season’s heavily symbolic opener, but it sets the stage for what promises to be a tumultuous, enticing end run.
  10. The "EZ" dialogue is terse, suggestive, pointed and often ambiguous. The complicated "Streets" story deals with issues of truth, honor, justice, vengeance and loyalty. Its stark moral conflicts, set in a shady criminal underworld, deserve positive comparisons to "On the Waterfront," "Serpico," "Where the Sidewalk Ends" and the first year of "Wiseguy." [25 Oct 1996]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  11. Toss in some sex and Southern-style politics, and you've got plenty to sing about.
  12. With their moody new mystery series The Killing, AMC clearly knows what's good for us.
  13. One of the better new series this fall despite a habit of turning mawkish in the last five minutes each week. It's helped immensely by its very endearing characters. [22 Sept 1998, p.41]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  14. Not only is it funny, it has an air of authenticity thanks to co-creator Mike Judge, who mines his previous experience as a Silicon Valley engineer for laughs.
  15. Take away the nude lovemaking scene, the revolutionary level of potent cussing, the curiosity-stirring controversies surrounding Steven Bochco's premeditated shock elements, and NYPD Blue remains one helluva cop show. [21 Sept 1993, p.35]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  16. This third season is more in keeping with Downton's first [season].
  17. The sometimes laughable soap opera aspects of the first year have been minimized. The pulse-racing, adrenaline-fueled suspense has been ratcheted up. If anything, this white-knuckle joy ride now moves faster than the clock that ticks steadily through each episode. [28 Oct 2002]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  18. The acting is brilliant, the problems are relatable, and the truths Dr. Weston is chasing are profound. On the other hand, In Treatment is the epitome of American self-indulgence, both for the actors and the characters they're playing.
  19. The Dust Bowl is more like eat-your-vegetables television than some of Burns' other endeavors, namely his last PBS documentary, "Prohibition." But it's still a worthwhile examination of an overlooked chapter from our past that holds plenty of lessons for our future.
  20. The use of animation makes it feel even more like something you’d see in a high school science class. Special effects have come a long way since 1980, yet they manage to be less impressive in this updated version that shoots for the stars but falls short.
  21. Half the fun of Behind the Candelabra is watching these two Hollywood heavyweights deftly tackle roles that could have been career-enders not that long ago.
  22. The new episodes find the upper-middle-class mother of two evolving into a gangster. This is a good move for the show. [13 Aug 2007]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's a beauty--in many ways richer than the Broadway production--and should not be missed.
  23. The series has a cinematic feel, with plenty of stand-alone, poignant moments punctuating each episode.
  24. Tedious.
  25. It's a lot of fun. It's funny. And stars Bret Harrison and Tyler Labine have better chemistry than most duos on TV.
  26. While no one will mistake Helena Bonham Carter for a twin of the legendary violet-eyed actress, she’s more than convincing alongside “The Wire’s” Dominic West, who brings a troubled Richard Burton to life.
  27. There's nothing wrong with "The Nine." It's just essentially a step above pedestrian.

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