Chicago Sun-Times' Scores

For 789 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Men of a Certain Age: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Back to You: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 544
  2. Negative: 0 out of 544
544 tv reviews
  1. One serious failing of the pilot is that, well, the group is nearly all white. There's barely a healthy tan in the bunch. Sorkin and Wells claim this is true only of the first episode and that more people of color will be added in subsequent hours....They better be. Not only is their absence an affront to minorities everywhere, it's an insult to our intelligence in what otherwise is a very smart show. [22 Sept 1999, p.47]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  2. The stereotypes slow down in subsequent episodes, which grew more entertaining with each of the four I watched.
  3. A success in that it exceeds expectations. It sets up the challenging premise that God -- in the personage of a hunky classmate, a cafeteria worker or who knows what -- might ask us to do things for reasons we can't immediately comprehend, and successfully straddles the razor-thin line between sacrilege and sacred. [26 Sept 2003, p.53]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    While John Adams succeeds as entertainment, it utterly fails as a history lesson.
  4. In better moments, "Weeds" proves small kerflops can be made interesting and fun to watch. In lesser moments, not so.
  5. The show is fast, funny and smart, although it stoops a little low for punchlines; I could do without the fat jokes and the cheap shot at Indira Gandhi. But the random humor pays off more often than not.
  6. When the boys team up to bring down fancy criminal types, the dialogue is sharp, the music is snappy and the clothes are snazzy.
  7. The storylines, as we meet the staff, feel as though they've been plucked from "St. Elsewhere," but things were brighter there -- both literally and figuratively. [10 Oct 2000, p.47]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    As the fifth season opens this week, the time-travel training wheels are coming off--and the path thus far seems blissfully free of the usual stumbling blocks.
  8. The cable network's political drama even has my vote for the best new show of the season.
  9. It's hard to say from the series whether "Stolen Summer" will succeed as a movie, but it's abundantly clear that Project Greenlight works as television. [30 Nov 2001, p.59]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  10. It isn't as ambitious or objective as HBO's "The Wire," but it's about as close as broadcast TV gets to "The Wire." It finely depicts the daily grim and gritty existence of kids and adults dealing with narrow hopes, sad expectations, provincial victories, race and poverty.
  11. The drama can be over the top, and sometimes it feels like one big ego trip for Leary.... But the show is like the comic: imperfect but lovable.
  12. The casting is for awesome, flat-out too-good-for-TV acting.
  13. It's a fresh, compelling story about a couple of KGB operatives pretending to live the American dream as a married couple with kids in suburban Washington, D.C.
  14. Fantastic, fascinating, creepy, charming and gruesome.
  15. The Bridge, which gets better with each of the first three episodes, ventures beyond a singular quest for a serial killer. Other intriguing storylines and characters are given ample attention.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The season premiere of Fox's hit series House carries the title "Dying Changes Everything" and, boy, does it ever. Tonight's episode is a must-watch for fans of the show.
  16. The pilot is a little light at bringing the funny, but the concept has promise--and Laurence Fishburne.
  17. These intimate, well-told stories become the ingredients for a new Foo Fighters song recorded at a local studio and performed at the end of each hourlong episode.
  18. It's hard for an artistic entity to balance that kind of American duality. Mad Men does so in a subtler and more natural way than "Natural Born Killers" did satirically.
  19. It's very appealing. Aliens in America pulls off its absurd, touchy situation by handling everything with a relaxed tone and excellent film work.
  20. Attains often-sublime lucidity by its second episode. [16 Sep 1994]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  21. Almost nothing about this series is conventional. That's part of the appeal.
  22. Ah, the joy of Glee. I thought the show had lost its way last season, trying to jam songs into theme episodes ("Hello"). But tonight's season opener proves that "Glee" is back in its groundbreaking groove, bringing music to the masses and making fun of itself in the process.
  23. I happen to believe Beavis and Butt-head is a work of twisted brilliance... It's cringingly blunt and cheerfully offensive. It's also a richly textured, dead-on satire of teenage life and pop culture, which explains its growing appeal with Generation X and even some baby boomers who haven't lost their senses of humor. [24 June 1993, p.11]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  24. Oddly compelling even though it's not nearly as edgy and smart as it thinks it is. [5 Nov 2004, p.51]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  25. The shaky debut has a few funny moments and more than a few duds. [24 Sep 1992]
    • Chicago Sun-Times
  26. Alicia's cases are intriguing, and the background drama would be melodramatic if it weren't such a common story these days.
  27. As realistic a series as you're bound to see in which a beautiful, smart, athletic and resourceful young woman moonlights for an ultrasecret wing of the Central Intelligence Agency in between her grad school studies. [28 Sept 2001, p.48]
    • Chicago Sun-Times

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