Chicago Tribune's Scores

For 4,590 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Capturing the Friedmans
Lowest review score: 0 Bratz
Score distribution:
4,590 movie reviews
  1. Not so much character-driven as character-dragged--against its will.
  2. The Nome King looks like a moveable Mt. St. Helens and he alone is magical. In fact, he blows Dorothy and her tacky-looking friends off the screen. So we end up liking the Nome King and hating Dorothy and her crowd, which I doubt was the intention of the L. Frank Baum series. [21 Jun 1985, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
  3. The Incredible Burt Wonderstone serves as a reminder that everything in a film has a chance to go wrong before a film begins filming. In other words: It's the script, stupid.
  4. A contemporary teen summer romance with a modern sexual twist--though in many ways, it's just the same old malarkey.
  5. Boasts one moment, perhaps three or four seconds in length, so delightfully intense and uncharacteristically juicy that the rest of the film - most of the rest of the whole series, in fact - looks pretty pale by comparison. Not vampire pale. Paler.
  6. G
    Cherot shot G on a tight schedule, but instead of this age-old indie predicament generating a certain scrappy passion, the film just looks cheap.
  7. Gordon is lost, and his style of shooting - telescopic close-ups, which never give us enough space to appreciate the performers - feels wrong for comedy.
  8. Phony, disingenuous family entertainment, suffocated by its green bean casserole approach to Middle America, spineless cardboard characters and paper-thin plot "twists."
  9. Just another self-absorbed teen chronicle, with the added twist of a little time travel and a surprise ending.
  10. The movie plays like a very expanded version of what would make -- and likely has made -- a cute TV newsmagazine segment.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    There is a great, even revolutionary movie to be made about pharmaceutical companies in America. Side Effects is definitely not it.
  11. There's nothing original about the father-son conflict that forms the core of the film, nor is there enough suspense and drama.
  12. Director Monteverde, whose previous feature, "Bella," came out nine years ago, clearly meant his film to lift up everyone and condescend to no one, least of all Pepper and Hashimoto. But Little Boy comes off as a picture-postcard fake.
  13. Combine the uninhibited raunchiness of John Waters with the gross-out zeal of the Farrelly brothers and you get Another Gay Movie, a parody and comedy more numbingly disgusting than funny.
  14. A weak romantic comedy.
  15. Gere and Binoche are both terribly miscast--one far too charismatic, the other far too dowdy, which is something for Juliette Binoche. And the spelling bees? Dull. Dreary.
  16. Worth your time and money? Fuhgeddaboutit.
    • Chicago Tribune
  17. Jason X conjures up more giggles than scares, assuming you make it through the first 15 minutes.
  18. Maybe this review is more about me than about Conan O'Brien, but I really couldn't get past the odor of self-congratulation emanating from nearly every scene in Conan O'Brien Can't Stop.
  19. It's a murky, empty-headed dive into the depths of the Antarctic and the heart of monster movie cliches that leaves you praying for most of the cast to get killed off fast, to put them (and us) out of our misery.
  20. If "American Beauty" were a bland comedy, it would be Joe Somebody.
  21. Falling Down is an intellectually sloppy, rebellious working-man adventure film that is little more than a set piece for Michael Douglas playing out a revenge-of-the-nerds fantasy. [26 Feb 1993, p.C]
    • Chicago Tribune
  22. As scary and minor-chord heavy as FearDotCom can be, there's no big payoff, no logical resolution.
  23. A huge waste of talent (Witherspoon's) and time (ours), a supernatural romantic comedy that is neither romantic, comedic, super or natural.
  24. The difference between Head of State and a good comedy is like the difference between Chris Rock and a real actor.
  25. Certain scenes in When in Rome signify nothing less than the death of screen slapstick, but I’m hoping it’s one of those fake-out movie deaths where it’s not really dead, not forever.
  26. It's a glossy, well-mounted, slickly done but almost stuporously predictable affair, both formula-bound and utterly illogical.
  27. Though I would agree it's original -- it's the first aboveground romance movie I've seen in which the heroine is repeatedly spanked, verbally tormented and tied to a chair by her lover--- it's not an experience I much enjoyed.
  28. Offers the most onscreen explosions in recent memory. It's almost pornography for arsonists.
  29. The appeal of the film version, such as it is, relates almost entirely to eye-for-an-eye, severed-limb-for-a-limb vengeance, two hours and 41 minutes of it, with just enough solemnity to make anyone who thought "The Dark Knight" was a little gassy think twice about which superhero myth THEY'RE calling gassy.

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