Chicago Tribune's Scores

For 4,541 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Painted Fire
Lowest review score: 0 Shadow Hours
Score distribution:
4,541 movie reviews
  1. A joy to behold, a complex film that never loses either its sense of purpose or sense of humor. [7 February 1986, Friday, p.33]
    • Chicago Tribune
  2. An adventure film that plays like an old-time 12-part serial that you see all at once, instead of Saturday-to-Saturday. It's a modern "Thief of Baghdad." It's the kind of movie that first got you excited about movies when you were a kid. (Translation for today's children: It's better than anything on TV.) [12 June 1981]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Has moments of profound poignance, though it lacks the overall dramatic impact of "The Long Way Home."
    • Chicago Tribune
  3. Some may find the film underpowered. Not me. With elegant understatement, Cohen creates a humane testament to reaching out, whatever our habits and routines.
  4. It's a scintillating comedy-drama and one of Altman's most richly moving and entertaining pictures.
  5. A watershed picture, for both Spielberg and war movies.
  6. Heroin may be a downer, but Trainspotting definitely takes you up…a series of roaring, provocative, outrageous highs. [26 July 1996, Friday, p.C]
    • Chicago Tribune
  7. The Master is brilliantly, wholly itself for a little more than half of its 137 minutes. Then it chases its own tail a bit and settles for being merely a fascinating metaphoric father-son relationship reaching endgame. It may not all "work," but most of it's remarkable.
  8. A prison movie of unusual richness and jarring power.
  9. The greatest rock concert movie ever made -- and maybe the best rock movie, period.
  10. It's a superb, thoughtful drama that doesn't claim to be a documentary and shouldn't be judged as such. [22 Dec 1995, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
  11. A visual and aural feast that combines elements of classic gangster melodramas, crime epics such as "The Godfather" and playful non-linear narratives such as "Amores Perros," City of God explores a deadly culture while feeling more alive than anything that's hit the big screen in years.
  12. Both the movie and Denzel Washington are knockouts.
    • Chicago Tribune
  13. Blends a love of semi-trashy pop entertainment with a love of poetry, art and high moral seriousness. It's a young person's movie (Godard was 34 and Karina 24 in 1964) that retains its mysterious pull even as the film and we get older.
  14. This remarkable movie is really one-of-a-kind. [15 Dec 1995]
    • Chicago Tribune
  15. One of those rare films that communicates the exquisite joy of the moviemaking process. [7 October 1994, Friday, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
  16. A fierce, brilliant film that breaks (and then mends) your heart.
  17. Sarandon delivers one of her very best performances; her shock at encountering the wrath of the victim's family is registered beautifully. And Sean Penn, who for too long has suffered with the label of being a "bad boy," gives an Oscar-caliber performance.[12 January 1996, Friday, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
  18. May show both director and star working at their professional peaks, but I don't think it's as good as that underappreciated masterwork "A.I." It's not as resonant and daring, not as full of magic and marvel. Spielberg stretches himself technically here but not emotionally.
  19. Delicately subversive, hypnotically sardonic, full of terror, banality and wafer-thin lyricism.
  20. Even with its limitations, I find Silent Light spellbinding.
  21. All but sweeps you away with its dazzling technique and shattering emotion. [27 November 1996, Tempo, p.1]
    • Chicago Tribune
  22. Finding Nemo and its Pixar predecessors tap into the shared gene among the kids and adults that delights in imagination-engaging, eye-tickling and wit-filled storytelling. You connect to these sea creatures as you rarely do with humans in big-screen adventures. The result: a true sunken treasure.
  23. Though it's a sad, somber, deeply questioning work, it's done with a light, loving spirit.
  24. One of the most curious and perversely brilliant films ever made in the American studio system. It's a shining example of qualities we don't normally see in our big theatrical pictures: vast ambition, huge resources and technical genius mated to a unique and compelling vision of life.
  25. Loach is a super-realist, and Sweet Sixteen has the disarming feel of a documentary. It's a film that miraculously catches life on the fly, without apparent embellishment, cliche or melodrama.
  26. Pulp Fiction isn't just funny. It's outrageously funny. [14 Oct 1994]
    • Chicago Tribune
  27. A great, velvety, beautiful anachronism. It's a movie almost drunk on romance, literature and cinema, a splendid period picture that keeps rashly breaking rules and boundaries [17 Sept 1993, Friday, p.A]
    • Chicago Tribune
  28. A beautiful film, harrowing, tough and rife with grief.
  29. It is enraging yet nuanced, an elusive combination for any documentary.

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