Chicago Tribune's Scores

For 4,541 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The French Connection (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 UHF
Score distribution:
4,541 movie reviews
  1. Formulaic romantic junk.
  2. Give David Arquette credit. He shares nearly all his screen time in See Spot Run with a clever canine and a cute kid and still manages to pull off his usual nutty-slapstick routine with gusto.
  3. Were it not for young star Amanda Bynes' energetic good nature in the face of drab dialogue and wooden stereotypes, What a Girl Wants might have been a career-ending movie violation rather than just an embarrassing fender-bender.
  4. Final Destination 3 is a gorefest that should either slake your worst appetites or drive you to the exits.
  5. The Love Guru”does not bring out Myer's best, and aside from a deft early Bollywood parody, there’s nothing visually to help the fun along.
  6. Cursed with an honest title, Failure to Launch waves a white flag in scene after scene, declaring surrender. We give up! We do not know how to make a decent mainstream romantic comedy!
  7. The pathos really are shameless, arriving with killing regularity and false humility.
  8. An oppressively cute Manhattan time-travel romantic comedy that’s lost in time, space and cliches.
  9. Isn't just the weakest of the "Die Hard" pictures; it's a lousy action movie on its own terms.
  10. It lacks a sharp look and satisfyingly fleshed-out story and compensates with one numbing round of insect- or human-based peril after another.
  11. In the end, Protocols of Zion is all context--a bit here about Father Coughlin, a minute there about the Holocaust, a stint with "The Passion" and a brief shot of Levin watching the beheading of Daniel Pearl--no soul.
  12. It's tough to get on board with these monsters. They don't get the banter they--or we--deserve, and the screenwriters lean on wearying stereotypes.
  13. Sometimes, you can use a smaller devil to catch the Devil, the movie suggests. But in this case, the entire movie goes to hell in record time.
  14. This is “True Lies” without the striptease or the Arab-maiming.
  15. The slapstick is awful; the pathos isn't much better, though it's far more plentiful.
  16. I'd be lying if I said I didn't laugh at some of this--though it's not as funny as Laurel and Hardy as toddlers in "Brats." But I wanted to slap myself whenever I did.
  17. The film is a fancy-pants muddle in terms of technique. And if Bloom doesn't do something about his smirky tendency to troll for audience approval, his career may be severely limited.
  18. An exhausting, predictable, even maddening moviegoing experience.
  19. Serves as both an homage to and shameless thief of its influences. The result: a sprawling, deformed, undisciplined piece of cinema that hobbles along on weak, genre-splicing tactics.
  20. Not without its humorous moments, but they are too few and far between.
  21. Just a schlock romance pumped with testosterone.
    • Chicago Tribune
  22. The film's crude humor and violence -- cartoonish, but still violent -- should offend parents of younger kids. Yet its ultra-broad, pratfall-filled comedy will satisfy only the most indiscriminate teens.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Critic Score
    Almost comes as a breath of fresh air. Too bad it's so foul.
  23. Despite a big budget, lots of technical flair and a good cast headed by Sarah Polley and Ving Rhames, it's mostly a bloody mess.
  24. Aside from influences such as "A Christmas Carol" and "It's a Wonderful Life," Click is so much like the Jim Carrey vehicle "Bruce Almighty"--Steve Koren and Mark O'Keefe worked on both--the writers could sue themselves for plagiarism and then write a screenplay about it.
  25. Black Snake Moan strikes me as hogwash. It fundamentally does not work; its consciously far-fetched, out-there notions of the things damaged people do in the name of love are reductive and go only so far. It's as if the premise were tethered to a radiator or something.
  26. Calling a sequel Are We Done Yet? is like calling it "Enough Already."
  27. The Producers on screen, as a musical, does not work. It is not very funny. It doesn't look right. It's depressing.
  28. Writer-director Thom Fitzgerald's ambitious but hopelessly inchoate AIDS drama is actually three separate, sequentially-told stories.
  29. A well-intentioned, ill-conceived blip of a movie that just happens to star two of the most esteemed actors of our time--Michael Caine and Christopher Walken.

Top Trailers