Chicago Tribune's Scores

For 4,539 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 The French Connection (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 UHF
Score distribution:
4,539 movie reviews
  1. It has a lack of ambition and energy that is almost total: It's the most this movie can do to roll over and ask for a little more lotion on its back. [22 July 1987]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 64 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Williams does a fine job with her role. I was pulling for her throughout her dreary journey. It's too bad it didn't get anywhere.
  2. Its jokes aren't funny. Its sloppy direction comes courtesy of Jordan Brady, who made "The Third Wheel," another reportedly failed comedy gathering cobwebs at Miramax.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Morgan Spurlock is a living, breathing cautionary tale. Take a good, long look, kids: This is what happens when society validates really annoying people.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    A sad, wasted movie.
  3. It breaks director Billy Wilder's most important movie commandment: Thou Shall Not Bore. It's just not funny.
  4. Rosenbush strives for a difficult blend of spoof and sincerity with Zen Noir. In the spirit of rebirth, let's assume that the next time he makes it, it'll turn out fine.
  5. A rather wan version of "Jurassic Park" - a series of setups featuring humans being picked off by bigger, faster and stronger carnivores.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    It's just a watery, undeservedly smug update of the low-budget, kids-stranded-in-the-sticks bloodfests of the 1970s and '80s.
  6. 99 minutes of excruciating "reality."
  7. Most of the humor is aimed at 14-year-olds.
    • Chicago Tribune
  8. Caruso, who showed flair in the Val Kilmer vehicle "The Salton Sea," has a penchant for the dark side. In this case, it's the plodding, predictable ZIP code of the dark side.
  9. Offers two or three worthwhile laughs.
  10. But in the end everything comes down to Lawrence, who has yet to develop a truly distinct comedic sensibility.
  11. In a case study of how to screw up a simple, powerful revenge story, director Jonathan Hensleigh punishes audiences with an unbearably sluggish action movie that requires the word "action" to be placed in quotes.
  12. Custom-designed for 13 year-olds, laden with broad sight gags, gross sound effects and a bowlful of potty jokes.
    • Chicago Tribune
  13. By embracing a static plot, making Gerardo a depressed Robotron and Mexico City a ghost town, Hernandez only succeeds in alienating us, even while focusing on the most universal of themes: Breaking up is hard to do.
  14. To call this movie a dog would also be an insult to canines, so let's just say Scooby-Doo 2 is a Scooby-Don't.
  15. Writer-director Stewart Wade expanded his festival-circuit short film into a blobby, watery feature-length enterprise, unredeemed by its cast (though Sally Kirkland shows up as Todd's mom).
  16. Revenge is a dish best served cold, as some Albanian dramatist once said, but Taken 2 isn't good-cold, as in steely and purposeful; it's cold as in "lost the scent."
  17. A staggeringly bad picture: a shallow, cliche-ridden mess that keeps blowing up on screen.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Dark Streets lost me early, real early, like still-adjusting-my-eyes-in-a-dark-theater early.
  18. Released in theaters five years after its 1999 Sundance Film Festival premiere, Kalem's film is too precious, too self-conscious and far too enamored with itself to ever have any kind of genuine emotional truth.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Critic Score
    Where the original was a serious film with funny moments, this movie isn't sure if it's a drama or comedy, too incompetently rendered to be both. What it accomplishes instead is to be nothing at all. An excessive, stupid, empty-headed nothing.
  19. The movie itself has no edge. It barely has a movie.
  20. A rock 'n' roll film should be funny-crazy -- not just a big, dumb promo for some over-the-hill dudes in makeup who are trying to sell today's kids on yesterday's glory by championing deliquency.
  21. Just Married is what industry people refer to as "January Junk," cinematic flotsam that gets tossed ashore once they have cleared the shelves of Oscar contenders.
  22. The film may as well be titled "Stephenie Meyer's Waiting Around."
  23. A stupid, stylized road picture. [10 Sept 1993]
    • Chicago Tribune
  24. In A Thousand Words the camera stays about two inches from Murphy's hyperactive face, and you start to see the strain and desperation in the actor's eyes.

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