Chicago Tribune's Scores

For 5,141 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 20 Feet from Stardom
Lowest review score: 0 Chappie
Score distribution:
5141 movie reviews
  1. There isn't a bad performance here, but besides Thornton, Luke stands out.
  2. Whiplash is true to its title. It throws you around with impunity, yet Chazelle exerts tight, exacting control over his increasingly feverish and often weirdly comic melodrama.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Many of us may have thought that with the world offering so much vivid horribleness every day, movies had lost the power to give us a good cathartic scare. It's a shock -- and a pleasure -- to discover we were wrong.
  3. The first great film of the year. It’s beautiful but so much more—full of subtle feeling, framed by a monstrous, eroding landscape.
  4. Like all great fantasies and epics, this one leaves you with the sense that its wonders are real, its dreams are palpable.
  5. It all comes together as formidably detailed and easy-breathing craftsmanship.
  6. So what we have in the middle of Back to the Future, this seeming kids' movie full of screeching cars, special effects and lightning storms, is nothing less than an adult reverie. And if families could be persuaded to see this film together, it might touch off a long night of sharing between parents and children. [03 July 1985]
    • Chicago Tribune
  7. Ran
    The physical scale of Ran is overwhelming. It's almost as if Kurosawa is saying to all the cassette buyers of America, in a play on Clint Eastwood`s phrase, "Go ahead, ruin your night"--wait to see my film on a small screen and cheat yourself out of what a movie can be.
  8. It's an uncompromising drama, not easy to watch. And it is one of the year's highlights.
  9. It takes something like a miracle to unlock the magic in his exquisite aggravations, the essence of the human comedy. This film is indeed something like a miracle.
  10. If it's not an actual masterpiece, it's at least the next best thing, a fully characteristic, fully alive work by a master of his art.
  11. What's so funny about Down and Out In Beverly Hills is not its moral imperative to appreciate life's simple, enduring pleasures. True, we get that message, and we appreciate it, but we already know that motto even if we don't live by it. No, what's funny is director Mazursky's extraordinarily fine eye and ear for capturing the way the wealthy residents of Beverly Hills walk, talk, dress and think.
  12. A film poem of sometimes humbling beauty: a movie that opens up a new world to us - in the mountains of Iranian Kurdistan - with an enchanting freshness and austerity of vision.
    • Chicago Tribune
  13. A joy to behold, a complex film that never loses either its sense of purpose or sense of humor. [7 February 1986, Friday, p.33]
    • Chicago Tribune
  14. Raiders of the Lost Ark is, in fact, about as entertaining as a commercial movie can be. What is it? An adventure film that plays like an old-time 12-part serial that you see all at once, instead of Saturday-to-Saturday. It's a modern "Thief of Baghdad." It's the kind of movie that first got you excited about movies when you were a kid.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Has moments of profound poignance, though it lacks the overall dramatic impact of "The Long Way Home."
    • Chicago Tribune
  15. Some may find the film underpowered. Not me. With elegant understatement, Cohen creates a humane testament to reaching out, whatever our habits and routines.
  16. It's a scintillating comedy-drama and one of Altman's most richly moving and entertaining pictures.
  17. A watershed picture, for both Spielberg and war movies.
  18. Heroin may be a downer, but Trainspotting definitely takes you up…a series of roaring, provocative, outrageous highs. [26 July 1996, Friday, p.C]
    • Chicago Tribune
  19. The Master is brilliantly, wholly itself for a little more than half of its 137 minutes. Then it chases its own tail a bit and settles for being merely a fascinating metaphoric father-son relationship reaching endgame. It may not all "work," but most of it's remarkable.
  20. A prison movie of unusual richness and jarring power.
  21. The greatest rock concert movie ever made -- and maybe the best rock movie, period.
  22. It's a superb, thoughtful drama that doesn't claim to be a documentary and shouldn't be judged as such. [22 Dec 1995, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
  23. A visual and aural feast that combines elements of classic gangster melodramas, crime epics such as "The Godfather" and playful non-linear narratives such as "Amores Perros," City of God explores a deadly culture while feeling more alive than anything that's hit the big screen in years.
  24. Both the movie and Denzel Washington are knockouts.
    • Chicago Tribune
  25. Blends a love of semi-trashy pop entertainment with a love of poetry, art and high moral seriousness. It's a young person's movie (Godard was 34 and Karina 24 in 1964) that retains its mysterious pull even as the film and we get older.
  26. This remarkable movie is really one-of-a-kind. [15 Dec 1995]
    • Chicago Tribune
  27. One of those rare films that communicates the exquisite joy of the moviemaking process. [7 October 1994, Friday, p.B]
    • Chicago Tribune
  28. A fierce, brilliant film that breaks (and then mends) your heart.

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