Chicago Tribune's Scores

For 4,502 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Before Sunset
Lowest review score: 0 UHF
Score distribution:
4,502 movie reviews
  1. The beauties of Shower lie in its human observation, in its funny interplay, candor, lusty acting and hearty simplicity - and also in its warm imagery and the fascinating symbolic use it makes of water.
  2. It's hard to watch and listen to Together without, in some sense, having your heart lifted by its music.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The four stars of Sisterhood are back for this smart, confident second act, based on novels by Anne Brashares.
  3. I greatly prefer this cleverly sustained and efficiently relentless remake to the '73 edition. It is lean and simple.
  4. In The Weather Man, Nicolas Cage, a great oddball movie star who sometimes takes enormous risks, has a good, risky part again.
  5. For a film that points out so much wrong with German society and shows such dubious, dangerous behavior, it leaves the audience with high spirits and a sense of crazy exhilaration.
  6. A film that art-house audiences in 1959 loved madly. And who can blame them? A buoyant, searingly colorful retelling of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth set in Rio de Janiero, writer-director's Marcel Camus' movie is a romance heightened by its backdrop.
  7. The movie looks like far more than a million dollars and it offers the kind of smart, picaresque good time you get from books like "The Reivers" and "Huckleberry Finn" and movies like "Bronco Billy" and "Bonnie and Clyde."
  8. The storytelling is episodic, and the film takes a little while to get going, but it hits its stride.
  9. A gargantuan epic, a historical adventure-drama of overwhelming visual grandeur.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Features colorful song-and-dance numbers that look and sound best in surround sound and on a huge screen.
  10. The Wrestler works for the same reason "Rachel Getting Married" works. The way they're acted, shot, edited and scored, both films deploy a loose, rough-hewn documentary style to great dramatic advantage. The corn isn't hyped. The performances click without going for the jugular.
  11. This century's Planet of the Apes is a rouser, a screaming-banshee fun house.
  12. These are real characters, fully observed, gutsily written, beautifully acted by the two leads.
  13. Has the kind of super-cinematic qualities and bravura acting that make up for almost anything.
    • Chicago Tribune
  14. Charlie, who owes an obvious debt to Chuck Jones' Wile E. Coyote, comes equipped with one of the most expressive faces in cartoon history: Bluth keeps his features-ears, snout, mouth, eyes-in constant flux, a beautiful blend of line and volume that represents the pinnacle of the animator's art. [17 Nov 1989]
    • Chicago Tribune
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Rarely does any film, animated or otherwise, immerse you in such a vivid landscape and engage your senses so strongly.
  15. So intense and warm are Leigh's feelings for his characters, that we may remember Hannah and Annie long afterward as old friends -- imperfect yet lovable, pals with whom we've suffered and laughed a lot.
  16. Showing us a world through a child's eyes, A Time for Drunken Horses speaks so truthfully and well that it breaks the heart and scars the conscience.
  17. It's a nerve-wracking visual experience of unusual and paradoxical delicacy. And if your stomach can take it, it's truly something to see.
  18. Shot with a Peter Greenaway-like austere impudence and edited brilliantly (by Jed Parker), this is an entertaining movie, and a moving one--even if, like me, you're not especially fond of these paintings or that scene.
  19. I prefer my horror with a chaser of wit, and Severance, a modest but very lively British import, serves it up in harsh but high style.
  20. It is a film, often breathtaking without settling for being pretty, filled with nervous silence.
  21. A deceptively simple French film about teaching that keeps enlarging as you watch it, becoming beautiful and inspiring in a way most films never touch.
  22. The kind of well-crafted, character-driven work that wows regional film festival crowds and public television audiences but seldom gets seen outside those circles.
  23. Get on Up hits all these high points. But the Butterworths fracture the order, fruitfully. They're more interested in making musical and dramatic connections across time and space — something in the '70s triggering a childhood memory, for example — than in laying them out predictably.
  24. More flat-out funny than "Rushmore," but in neither film is the humor joke-based. What you're laughing at is the behavior of characters who are so fixed in their idiosyncratic worldviews that they can't help but careen into each other like out-of-control bumper cars.
  25. Witness" is both exciting and thoughtful.... And just as important to moviegoers, Witness is a genuinely gripping thriller. [08 Feb 1985]
    • Chicago Tribune
  26. Bening shines, and the film shines too.
  27. It's an intellectual family film for literate parents and children, immensely pleasing if not perfect, perhaps a smidgen too brightly evasive and determinedly charming.

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