Christian Science Monitor's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,556 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Silver City
Lowest review score: 0 Half Baked
Score distribution:
3,556 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Stephen Root, Ted Danson, Dermot Mulroney, and other familiar faces lend their support, but it's not enough to overcome the limp, by-the-numbers execution. The film comprises innumerable expository scenes, leavened with uninspired comic relief.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Harrelson is effective, but the film isn't helped by the inevitable comparisons to the far superior "L.A. Confidential" and "Bad Lieutenant" movies.
  1. This movie is "Finian's Rainbow" for dunderheads. Rudd has a few amusing moments talking to himself in a mirror (he's trying to convince himself he's a stud) but he would have been better off talking himself out of this film.
  2. The idiocy of the film's conceit is that Simon recruits innocents like Will to carry out these vigilante killings.
  3. The plot slogs along and family secrets are hauled out, each more implausible than the next.
  4. 360
    Morgan is a wonderful writer when he's working from the headlines, but his "personal" movies, like "Hereafter" and this one, release a bleary, pseudo-profound aspect of his talent that's best left in the dark.
  5. Potty jokes and bawdy gross-outs predominate, and the few good laughs are swamped by the overall laughlessness.
  6. As for me, I don't see why women being as slobby and gross as the guys is such a feminist breakthrough – especially since, as in Bachelorette, the slobbiness and grossness is witless.
  7. Sean Penn is one of those actors, like Nicolas Cage, who is best (sometimes worst) when he's over-the-top. Unlike Cage, Penn doesn't pour himself into dreadful commercial vehicles. No, his dreadful movies are usually not destined for the multiplex. Case in point: This Must Be the Place.
  8. One of the many, many things wrong with Joe Wright's Anna Karenina, starring Keira Knightley as literature's most famous adulteress – take that, Emma Bovary! – is that one never feels the love. It's a conceit in search of a movie. It could just as easily have been titled "Décor."
  9. The jokes mostly fall flat and the dramatic scenes fall even flatter.
  10. Granted, this is not automatic laugh-riot material, nor should it be, but didn’t Fey recognize how hackneyed it all is? Does being a movie star mean blanding out everything that makes you special?
  11. 42
    The filmmaking is TV-movie-of-the-week dull and Robinson’s ordeal is hammered home to the exclusion of virtually everything else in his life.
  12. Is it possible to truly start life all over again? Arthur Newman might have been better if it had not started at all.
  13. Is Malick deliberately courting self-parody here? Probably not. That would imply he had a sense of humor.
  14. The Great Gatsby isn’t simply a classic American text: In Luhrmann’s hands, it’s also the greatest self-help manual ever written.
  15. The tonal problem of the second installment, which often resembled a drug-infested pulp thriller instead of a comedy, is also problematic here.
  16. It’s impossible to take this movie seriously, certainly not as seriously as it takes itself.
  17. There’s a potentially good comedy to be made about old-school guys trying to make a go of it in a youth-dominated digital marketplace, but director Shawn Levy and screenwriter Jared Stern overdose on moronic excursions.
  18. Hammer plays the Lone Ranger as a clueless, stolid square, and the resulting contrast with Depp’s cartoonishness isn’t odd-couple funny, just blah.
  19. The blue humor in We’re the Millers is just bland. And yes, Aniston performs a (modified) striptease. That’s pretty bland, too.
  20. I kept expecting Sacha Baron Cohen to traipse onto the scene. Alas, he doesn’t.
  21. Hailee Steinfeld’s Juliet is rather lovely and rather bland; Douglas Booth’s Romeo might have stepped out of a special Renaissance Faire edition of GQ.
  22. The melancholy in this film is just as trumped up as the frenzy.
  23. It’s like an over-the-hill gang variant on “The Dirty Dozen,” except not as much fun as that sounds.
  24. Practically every gag in this movie, and there are scores of them, is milked dry. When the gags aren’t very good to begin to with, this is a prescription for disaster.
  25. The still youthful-looking Sarandon playing a grandmother is a jolt, especially since she doesn’t resemble the doddering roustabout she’s supposed to be playing. Maybe that’s why the director Ben Falcone (McCarthy’s husband and, with her, the film’s co-writer) gives Sarandon a full head of gray hair.
  26. The acting is sincere and the camera work is pretty, but this art-movie variation on "The Sixth Sense" doesn't have enough energy to fulfill the high promise of Berliner's previous picture, the enchanting "Ma vie en rose."
  27. In all, it's “Diner,'' female style. Directed by Donald Petrie from a blatantly manipulative screenplay that took four people to cook up. [24 Oct 1988]
    • Christian Science Monitor
  28. The message of the film is that life isn't neat and predictable like a well-arranged business trip; yet everything in the picture is so calculated that there's no life to it. [23 Dec 1988, A& L, p.19]
    • Christian Science Monitor

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