Christian Science Monitor's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,690 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Or
Lowest review score: 0 Wild Hogs
Score distribution:
3,690 movie reviews
  1. The performances by Phoenix and Hoffman are studies in contrast. Phoenix carries himself with a jagged, lurching, simianlike grace while Hoffman gives Dodd a calm deliberateness. Both actors have rarely been better in the movies. The real Master class here is about acting – and that includes just about everybody else in the film, especially Adams, whose twinkly girl-next-door quality is used here to fine subversive effect.
  2. Lively characters, snappy dialogue, and snazzy visuals make this an uncommonly fine animation.
  3. In the end, this melancholy, inspiriting movie achieves a breathtaking emotional harmoniousness.
  4. The latter element joins with Crudup's excellent acting to make this deliberately scruffy tale a worthwhile experience if you can handle its explicitly sordid subplots.
  5. The acting is smart and gritty, Almereyda's visual style has a raw immediacy found in few films with Shakespearean pedigrees, and an eclectic music score adds atmosphere and surprise every step of the way.
  6. It's never been topped.
  7. An ingeniously scripted psychological thriller.
  8. A remarkable movie about a remarkable friendship. It honors the audience's intelligence, which makes it a double rarity.
  9. This is a riveting treatment of a fascinating subject.
  10. A semi-improvised, microbudget marvel with a range of feeling that shames most big-budget star-driven movies.
  11. Intimate and engaging.
  12. Can a misguided adult start afresh with a new set of values and priorities? This ambitious drama, directed by one of France's most resourceful filmmakers, explores that crucial question in depth and detail.
  13. This delicate, hand-drawn marvel is lyrical and heartbreaking in ways that most live-action movies never approach.
  14. Frederick Wiseman’s documentary National Gallery is for art lovers, movie lovers – basically for anybody. Ostensibly a film about London’s famous museum, it’s really about the experience of art in all its manifestations.
  15. Gentle, humanistic, delicious.
  16. Or
    Yedaya's prizewinning debut film is acted and directed with uncommon psychological realism.
  17. Results are illuminating, harrowing, and riveting.
  18. Strange, scary, and atmospheric, with a delicious Claude Debussy score.
  19. Visually sublime and intellectually dense, this is one of the extremely rare movies that prove cinema can be as complex and profound as the very greatest art works in any form.
  20. The story has old-fashioned characters and situations, and Haas has sensibly filmed it in an old-fashioned way, stressing visual appeal rather than the story's sordid undertones. The acting is excellent, too.
  21. Von Trier sets the action on a theatrical stage, spotlighting the existential isolation that weighs on people who don't seek larger visions of life, individuality, and community. Challenging, dramatic, provocative.
  22. Altogether fascinating.
  23. This thoughtful, troubling drama is leagues above the sensationalistic stuff Araki peddled in earlier films.
  24. Piccoli gives one of the most nuanced performances of his distinguished career, but the primary star of the movie is de Oliveira, who unfolds the story with unfailing skill and sensitivity.
  25. At the very least, look for it on 10-best lists next month, and there's every chance it will be a strong contender at the Oscars. Filmmaking so sensitive and intelligent deserves its weight in honors.
  26. This is one of the rare movies to explore American materialism through the eyes of an all-too-ordinary person who isn't up to the challenges of everyday life.
  27. For Your Consideration is, except for "Borat," the funniest film of the year. Or, it's the funniest film that you don't have to watch through parted fingers.
  28. Gripping, suspenseful, and spiced with fascinating information about the long history of chess between human and mechanical opponents.
  29. One of Almodóvar's most challenging pictures, jumping around in time and sending a large gallery of characters through a wide variety of situations -- will find him again at the peak of his powers.
  30. The acting is brilliant and Leigh's screenplay - developed through his usual process of improvisation and rehearsal - is very long on compassion, very short on preaching and politics.

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