Christian Science Monitor's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 3,929 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Afterimage
Lowest review score: 0 Final Destination 3
Score distribution:
3929 movie reviews
  1. Unexpectedly subtle cinematic style.
  2. The picture's thoughtfulness and ambition make it unusually suspenseful, gripping, and disturbing.
  3. One of Almodóvar's most challenging pictures, jumping around in time and sending a large gallery of characters through a wide variety of situations -- will find him again at the peak of his powers.
  4. The performances by Phoenix and Hoffman are studies in contrast. Phoenix carries himself with a jagged, lurching, simianlike grace while Hoffman gives Dodd a calm deliberateness. Both actors have rarely been better in the movies. The real Master class here is about acting – and that includes just about everybody else in the film, especially Adams, whose twinkly girl-next-door quality is used here to fine subversive effect.
  5. A heartbreakingly powerful masterpiece.
  6. Smart, funny, stimulating.
  7. Loach has made more memorable films, such as "Raining Stones" and "Ladybird Ladybird," but his dramatic sense remains strong and his social conscience is absolutely unstoppable.
  8. The film should captivate anyone with a taste for bold cinematics, unpredictable storytelling, and pitch-black humor aimed at the worthiest of targets: a self-involved and self-congratulatory, industry that often gives lip service to art while worshipping the bottom line. [10 Apr 1992]
    • Christian Science Monitor
  9. It combines a fresh and exciting style with stunning performances and that rarity in current film, a deeply humanistic story.
  10. A marvel.
  11. Alternately inspirational and disheartening, galvanizing and wearying.
  12. The enchanting French-Belgian animated feature Ernest & Celestine is so liltingly sweet and graceful that, a day or two after I saw it, it seemed almost as if I had dreamed it.
  13. This is Hollywood's most mature treatment of the '50s-nostalgia theme so far, and the most accurate.
  14. A ruthless dissection of suburban malaise.
  15. Fan's camera moves sinuously through these people's lives and gives a human face to a national panorama.
  16. The endangered swampland dwellers are supposed to be an indigenous pastoral community threatened by eco-unfriendly oil refineries. I kept rooting for Hushpuppy and Co. to leave behind their squalor and relocate. This is not the politically correct response.
  17. Too much of this film is attenuated and vague, but it has moments of deep melancholy.
  18. Politics and humanism find an engrossing balance in this ambitious drama based on the life of Reinaldo Arenas, a gay Cuban poet who was persecuted by the homophobic Castro regime.
  19. Director Paul Greengrass downplays the movie's travelogue aspects by repeating the bobbly, hand-held camera style he used on "The Bourne Supremacy." It's not a style I'm fond of.
  20. Begins frighteningly and gets progressively more so.
  21. Farhadi’s new film, The Salesman, isn’t his best, or even second best, but it offers up glints of what, at times, makes him one of the best directors around.
  22. Wittily written and deliciously acted, Lonergan's debut film is a clear cut above the average.
  23. Has a sense of emotional urgency and deep-dwelling grief.
  24. Heavily influenced by Quentin Tarantino's brand of quirky sensationalism, this high-energy saga by Paul Thomas Anderson goes a long way toward exposing the greed and stupidity of the pornography trade, then loses its moral compass and steers toward a sadly superficial ending.
  25. Despite its blunt characterizations and simplifications, City of Life and Death, through the inexorable pileup of gruesome detail, achieves an epic vision of horror.
  26. The plot may be a bit too busy, but a great wash of transcendent imagery floods the screen. If I had to recommend the best children’s film out there for all ages, this one, and “The Tale of Princess Kaguya,” would easily top the charts.
  27. Amy
    A powerful, and powerfully sad, experience.
  28. Intermittently powerful drama explores a cross-cultural estrangement.
  29. As thin and jokey as this movie often is, I prefer it to the serioso treatment that usually encrusts this type of material. At its best, The Savages captures the lunacy that comes with coping with sorrow.
  30. Whatever it is, Exit Through the Gift Shop is an original.

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