Clash Music's Scores

  • Music
For 1,073 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Exile On Main Street [Reissue]
Lowest review score: 10 Cardiology
Score distribution:
1,073 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With 37 previously unreleased performances, On Air Volume 2 is essential for any Beatles collector. For everyone else, it’s an informal insight into the world’s greatest group on the verge of an exhilarating ascent.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    On Shangri La he has captured everything cleanly and sparsely to really let Jake’s storytelling shine. The resulting exposure makes for a mature and remarkable album.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    After the delicate beauty of previous albums, this is the sound of an artist unleashed.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Beyoncé’ is one of the best damn albums of 2013, basically, however you’re looking at it: as an R&B record, a pop set, an electro collection. Whatever your tastes, you can’t question the quality here.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is music that’s meticulous and expansive without ever falling into the trap of being boring or self-indulgent.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What could so nearly have been overbearing or desperate to be loved is, in actual fact, sincerely captivating and euphorically playful.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Young Fathers possess that which makes the best British acts truly special: a singular identity born of multinational mixology.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s the sound of ‘60s experimentation smashed stunningly into the present day.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Passion is a puzzling thing, expressed in myriad manners. But it can never be fabricated, and Ought’s heated brand of it is amongst the most bracing sounds anyone can encounter in 2014.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A damaged but delightful long-player, then, perfect for fans of Daughter and Camera Obscura.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    To Be Kind is altogether more colourful, an expansive record--fleshier, bloodier and lusciously psychedelic.... Near perfection.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s a truly fascinating listen.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With lyrics dripping with casual poetic nuance and bold, full arrangements, Stay Gold is at once an arresting set of classic country reference points as well as a towering body of stirring, beguilingly original songs.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This polished set is pure aural candy from front-to-back and firmly re-establishes Jackson as one of Britain’s premier pop talents.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    All one can do is let the album play through again, though, is indicative of the great power this exhibition of completely engrossing, electrifyingly ambitious avant-dance(hall) possesses.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s great fun, and clearly a Bay Area attempt at the big league. Like hip-hop used to sound. Praise be.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a mix of frantic and scrappy pop songs alongside blankets of processed peacefulness Contra is a fun and always intriguing listen.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    End Times may be a tunnel with no light at the end of it, but the bleakness is beautiful.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Romance Is Boring is another step up for the Cardiff seven-piece; avoiding the shoutier, brattier elements of debut ‘Hold On Now, Youngster...’, the band bring to their latest effort a much darker atmosphere, with similarly desperate lyrics.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Many have already been drawn into the melancholy whirlpools of their past two albums; yet more will surely be drawn by the warmer embrace of Legrand and Scally’s latest statement, a stronger, rhythmic definition offering a hand through the ether, beckoning the listener into their fluid tapestry.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Angie Stone’s fifth album, is her strongest to date, as she delivers an LP that effortlessly combines the finest elements of Neo Soul with old-skool R&B.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Falling Down A Mountain marks the return of a bolder spirit and, as a result, there is another truly great Tindersticks album to add to your collection.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This debut album from the Manchester trio is a captivating Gothic Americana creation.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A solid second record with tinges of brilliance, it’s another fine piece of work from the busiest man around.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Returning from a six-year long wilderness of soundtrack work and greatest hits, ‘Heligoland’ sees the duo back at the top of their game.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Clocking in at less than 33 minutes to ensure your left gagging for more, Sweet Heart Rodeo is a near faultless blend of Landes’ country roots and the urban savvy of her Brooklyn base.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Big layers of instruments dual with and complement each other via weird time signatures, and inspired, complex riffs that sound like they’re scoring a car chase from a cult Seventies film, mixed with bursts of electronic futurism--perhaps best displayed on the album’s title track--a manic, brilliant piece of instrumental songwriting that shows Jaga Jazzist to be at the top of their game.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With echoes of Lou Reed in many of the tracks, including ‘What Makes Him Act So Bad’ and ‘Cigarette Burns Forever’, and faint hints of Green’s previous work with the Peaches in others - ‘Oh Shucks’ - ‘Minor Love’ sees Green marry his roots with the new directions he’s taking, and comparison to the tape recorder fodder of old isn’t so hard make anymore.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    2009 has seen the emergence and critical success of other techno-pop bands, including The xx and Fever Ray, and Pantha du Prince plays into exactly this sort of intelligent, thoughtful, and in many ways uplifting music.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Taught and lean, bold and mean, Blood Red Shoes are fighting fit and Fire Like This might just be their knock-out punch.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their third album in as many years, JJ continue to gather a pace and 'No.3' will surely propel them further into hearts and minds.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From the monasteric vocal and Union of Knives-esque menace of ‘The Infinites’ to the shades of Hot Chip (‘Price On Your Head’) and Ladytron (‘Boy Girl’), ‘Back To Light’ is another early marker in what’s shaping up to be a stellar year for dance music.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ‘Sea Change’ is as epic as anything that came later, Knights’ vocal supplemented by a rich seam of orchestration, but much of the material here could have been lifted from those early recordings, where skeletal fret work frames angelic vocals. A return to the source.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Wild Hunt, the second release from Swedish guitar-twanging folksy master The Tallest Man On Earth, is a graceful and beautiful advancement of form, and matures just the way a second album really ought to.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This first true-solo effort sees the man responsible for some of rock's most iconic riffery joining forces with the friends he met on the way (including The Cult's Ian Astbury, Lemmy and Iggy Pop) and is a rocking riot from the off.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While no single track quite matches Four Tet's 'Love Cry', it's as good overall as his contemporary's recent 'There Is Love In You'.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Never one to hide his emotions previously, Rufus Wainwright offers a sparse but staggeringly heartfelt collection of songs for voice and piano, influenced, at least in part, by the long-term illness and recent passing of his mother.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dense and obtuse it may be but those who follow this most intense sonic explorer will be rewarded the greatest.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lean, mean and as uncompromisingly focused as its maker, this is an album for everyone's collection, and whilst Weller is perhaps not the man he once was, the man he is now is most definitely still a force to be reckoned with.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album might not carry the sub-woof weight of its predecessor but it carries the icy menace of producers at the peak of their powers. Cooler than a liquid nitrogen drip.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Still in place is their frenetic rushes of sonic trickery, but most notably the band have relaxed a little and even got a little funky.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Total Life Forever is a massive leap forward for the band. The music writhes with a renewed ambition, capable of moving from near ambient strains of electronica to propulsive African funk in a drum break.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Infinite Arms is their strongest album yet, perfecting their instantly recognisable sound with Bridwell in fine voice throughout.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A curious state of affairs on the surface, this is no empty exercise in muso accomplishment. Lidell’s voice is a thing of wonder, a match for or indeed bettering many of R‘n’B’s mainstream performers.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sleigh Bells' novelty though, lies in a tingling barrage of granular guitar distortion and overdriven, over-compressed girl-pop squall.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An ever present Gang of Four musical demeanor, and the untiring pace of Fugazi makes 'The Chaos' quite aptly relentless.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shadows returns to the lush, meticulously crafted sound of previous albums.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Again, like their previous work, 'Champ' is a short and sweet affair - but not one to miss or forget.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A magical insight into the development of Rossen's creative genius.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the pace hardly fluctuates wildly, the constant twists and turns create an emotional collage that's stunning: expect to be left contemplative and euphoric in equal measure.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Brief though it is, 'Strange Weather, Isn't It?' represents a remarkable sharpening of focus at a time of flux - and possibly crisis - for the band.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Gothic undertones of the previous two albums have been slightly toned down, but not that much, and this time they also manage to rock out with some more bluesy and electric tracks.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Combining this pandemonium with a more polished finish on the cosmic pop of "Echoes" and trademark falsetto chants of "Venusia," it's safe to say Surfing the Void was worth the wait.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Utilizing much fuller and considerably more electronic arrangements this time around, the album is uplifting and hopeful, though no less poignant; the tender self-evaluation of "What I Have To Offer" providing one of many particularly sweet moments.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A quality accompaniment and memorial.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pitched as the genealogy of DFA records in one album, Shit Robot finally lays down his manifesto as an incisive filter.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is a bold step, Spunt and Randall striving to write songs they would be psyched to listen to, and moving in a direction that will fail to disappoint fans of earlier releases 'Nouns' and 'Weirdo Rippers'. Rad.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There will be plenty of people who opt to be snobby about the fact that this record is so commercial, so polished and so brazen, but those people are all, to a man, idiots. If you can't love these songs, you are incapable of experiencing joy itself.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The swagger comes in the form of knowing your strengths and for Stern, she's put all of them on display with Marnie Stern.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Come Around Sundown is the remarkable product of an ambitious supergroup expanding their horizons, and is absolutely worth persevering with.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A daydream-like haze smudges the crispness of the beats while Lewis sings his osmotic melodies, his tones akin to Richard Swift gone disco.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Union is a mutual display of affection from both sides - Elton and Bernie's nostalgic tales are infused with gospel, rollicking country and rock 'n' roll, while Leon's croaky voice adds southern authenticity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Half the tracks see the beats surface into formed drums but for the rest the stratification and distortion takes the sound field to new places. Dangerously engaging.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With the veteran experimentalists on a self-imposed hiatus--and now a drummer light--Not Music offers a stopgap if not a final full stop to a kaleidoscopic career.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By concentrating heavily on this former and earlier part of Elliott Smith's career, the compilers of An Introduction To... have gathered some of his best songs into a starkly beautiful and coherent album.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rich, detailed, and poetic, Blurry Blue Mountain explores human emotion and the meaning of life like the great writers of old. Gelb has been around a long time, and on the basis of this he will be for a long time to come.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band's third generation began just after the turn of the century and this LP completes a trilogy of new work that is confident yet vulnerable, refined yet earthy, moody yet flippant, representing a highly commendable contribution to the current scene, suggesting they are more relevant today than ever before.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Less folksy, more funky, Kiss Each Other Clean is a rather more lively, sometimes even poppy record.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nathan Willett digs deep into fractured relationships for inspiration and the resultant openness, coupled with King's deft nurturing of Willett's soul-searching, has created the finest Cold War Kids album yet.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Made on an iPad during the band's autumn tour of America, this hastily constructed, bleepy sketchbook of a record is a delight.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The prominence of structure beams through and makes this more of a traditional offering than a novelty. Still unlike anything else, this is time well spent.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In no way throwaway, this is a trip.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like following a serial killer's trail of devastation, you're gripped until the end, no matter how grisly the conclusion. Bewitching.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hotel Shampoo shows off a simpler, stripped back Rhys - whose lyrics are placed front and centre of beautifully arranged tracks, each imbued with an infectious energy.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Authoritatively potent, bitterly bleak and beautiful, this record is an unexpected but essential punch in the face.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bolt on an undeniably zealous execution, a set of simple yet well-written songs, add an element of confident adventure via some experimentation and diversity and the rebirth of indie may just have found its leading protagonists.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The second Telekinesis album suggests that Michael Lerner's gift for hooky, college-radio friendly indie-pop shows no signs of abating.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A shift away from the sampling of his debut, Underneath The Pine keeps things sweet and traditional, leaving you lazily grinning from ear to ear.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A dizzyingly ferocious support slot on the recent Gold Panda tour proved that London-based producer/remixer Alessio Natalizia's one-time bedroom project is now fully-formed.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dark, deluded and dangerously danceable, Paris Suit Yourself are the inspiration for wild dance floor seizures, or, at the very least, lucid gonzo dreams.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lykke Li seems to have made it work for her.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Beautifully produced and blessed with Guy Garvey in fine voice, it's a small but perfectly formed step forward.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It won't be everyone's cup of tea but this could well be a guilty pop pleasure for many.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While The Strokes have outgrown any notions of being rock's saviours, in doing so they could just have delivered what might be their best album since Is This It. It's certainly their most diverse.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pearson's mournful growl, and the brutal honesty in raking over his personal failings, makes for a majestic, in-the-dead-of-the-night confessional.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Criminally under exposed.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Often accused of being too calculating in his constructs, Mind Bokeh emerges as a spectral funk odyssey.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Simultaneously depressing and uplifting, evil and camp, it's an inspiring, majestic paradox of an album.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Favouring shamelessly blokey call-and-response hooks and not averse to "woos" and "woah-woah-woahs", these tales of love chased, lost and briefly enjoyed are delivered with an infectious enthusiasm and blessed with production by Edwyn Collins.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Amid the deferential nods, Mazes exude vigour and vibrancy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Undeniably formulaic but just as captivatingly beautiful, solemn closer Let Me Back In is the track-stopping highlight, painstakingly building to a crescendo before the ghost voices drift out. Glorious.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hot Sauce Committee Part Two is probably the third best Beastie Boys album ever made. And that is not a pejorative. Boggle!
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What we needed to decipher from this album was whether Miles Kane was capable of anything audacious, anything unexpected, complex and constructed. Colour Of The Trap displays this on numerous occasions, unrelenting in its boasts of adventurous and candid variation.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With the cool-o-meter currently set at all things synthy and coldwave-y, Austra look set for big things.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With such grand ambitions achieved, great music produced, and a five year journey concluded and justified, Morricone would be proud: Rome was well worth the wait.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    W
    An enthralling listen from a compelling artist prepared to push the unorthodox.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His use of simile and metaphor is questionable but with an irrepressible energy and guest vocal spots from Kelly Rowland (Invincible) and Ellie Goulding (Wonderman) on top of three top five hits, this Peckham born rapper might just have made the most fun pop album of the year.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    My Morning Jacket should be celebrated as a band that tirelessly deliver value for money--there's enough in here to keep you listening for months on end, and loving every minute of it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cloud Control's debut is making an early play for the feel-good record of 2011. There are more hooks in Bliss Control's thirty-nine minutes than in Captain Birdseye's entire fleet.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A wonderful, worthy follow-up.