Clash Music's Scores

  • Music
For 943 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Goodbye Yellow Brick Road [40th Anniversary Edition]
Lowest review score: 10 Until One
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 10 out of 943
943 music reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With echoes of Lou Reed in many of the tracks, including ‘What Makes Him Act So Bad’ and ‘Cigarette Burns Forever’, and faint hints of Green’s previous work with the Peaches in others - ‘Oh Shucks’ - ‘Minor Love’ sees Green marry his roots with the new directions he’s taking, and comparison to the tape recorder fodder of old isn’t so hard make anymore.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    2009 has seen the emergence and critical success of other techno-pop bands, including The xx and Fever Ray, and Pantha du Prince plays into exactly this sort of intelligent, thoughtful, and in many ways uplifting music.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Taught and lean, bold and mean, Blood Red Shoes are fighting fit and Fire Like This might just be their knock-out punch.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their third album in as many years, JJ continue to gather a pace and 'No.3' will surely propel them further into hearts and minds.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From the monasteric vocal and Union of Knives-esque menace of ‘The Infinites’ to the shades of Hot Chip (‘Price On Your Head’) and Ladytron (‘Boy Girl’), ‘Back To Light’ is another early marker in what’s shaping up to be a stellar year for dance music.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ‘Sea Change’ is as epic as anything that came later, Knights’ vocal supplemented by a rich seam of orchestration, but much of the material here could have been lifted from those early recordings, where skeletal fret work frames angelic vocals. A return to the source.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Wild Hunt, the second release from Swedish guitar-twanging folksy master The Tallest Man On Earth, is a graceful and beautiful advancement of form, and matures just the way a second album really ought to.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This first true-solo effort sees the man responsible for some of rock's most iconic riffery joining forces with the friends he met on the way (including The Cult's Ian Astbury, Lemmy and Iggy Pop) and is a rocking riot from the off.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While no single track quite matches Four Tet's 'Love Cry', it's as good overall as his contemporary's recent 'There Is Love In You'.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Never one to hide his emotions previously, Rufus Wainwright offers a sparse but staggeringly heartfelt collection of songs for voice and piano, influenced, at least in part, by the long-term illness and recent passing of his mother.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dense and obtuse it may be but those who follow this most intense sonic explorer will be rewarded the greatest.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lean, mean and as uncompromisingly focused as its maker, this is an album for everyone's collection, and whilst Weller is perhaps not the man he once was, the man he is now is most definitely still a force to be reckoned with.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album might not carry the sub-woof weight of its predecessor but it carries the icy menace of producers at the peak of their powers. Cooler than a liquid nitrogen drip.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Still in place is their frenetic rushes of sonic trickery, but most notably the band have relaxed a little and even got a little funky.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Total Life Forever is a massive leap forward for the band. The music writhes with a renewed ambition, capable of moving from near ambient strains of electronica to propulsive African funk in a drum break.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Infinite Arms is their strongest album yet, perfecting their instantly recognisable sound with Bridwell in fine voice throughout.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A curious state of affairs on the surface, this is no empty exercise in muso accomplishment. Lidell’s voice is a thing of wonder, a match for or indeed bettering many of R‘n’B’s mainstream performers.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sleigh Bells' novelty though, lies in a tingling barrage of granular guitar distortion and overdriven, over-compressed girl-pop squall.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An ever present Gang of Four musical demeanor, and the untiring pace of Fugazi makes 'The Chaos' quite aptly relentless.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shadows returns to the lush, meticulously crafted sound of previous albums.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Again, like their previous work, 'Champ' is a short and sweet affair - but not one to miss or forget.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A magical insight into the development of Rossen's creative genius.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the pace hardly fluctuates wildly, the constant twists and turns create an emotional collage that's stunning: expect to be left contemplative and euphoric in equal measure.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Brief though it is, 'Strange Weather, Isn't It?' represents a remarkable sharpening of focus at a time of flux - and possibly crisis - for the band.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Gothic undertones of the previous two albums have been slightly toned down, but not that much, and this time they also manage to rock out with some more bluesy and electric tracks.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Combining this pandemonium with a more polished finish on the cosmic pop of "Echoes" and trademark falsetto chants of "Venusia," it's safe to say Surfing the Void was worth the wait.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Utilizing much fuller and considerably more electronic arrangements this time around, the album is uplifting and hopeful, though no less poignant; the tender self-evaluation of "What I Have To Offer" providing one of many particularly sweet moments.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A quality accompaniment and memorial.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pitched as the genealogy of DFA records in one album, Shit Robot finally lays down his manifesto as an incisive filter.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album is a bold step, Spunt and Randall striving to write songs they would be psyched to listen to, and moving in a direction that will fail to disappoint fans of earlier releases 'Nouns' and 'Weirdo Rippers'. Rad.