Consequence of Sound's Scores

For 3,221 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 This Is Our Science
Lowest review score: 10 BAYTL
Score distribution:
3221 music reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There is no question that this album is a game changer. It's Kanye West's greatest work.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    James Blake is an essential for anybody interested in witnessing how pop music can and will continue to change, progress, and grow into something new with time.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is the best album for 2011, and not just the last two months.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's easy to lose yourself in the countless studio takes. Little gasps of pure genius here and there. The slow dissolution to it all. The echoes of things to come. It's a history lesson come to life, and that's part of the reason the collection here works so well.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    While that record [Pomegranate] was expansive and full of divergent genres and characters, This Is Our Science condenses the process into a tight 40 minutes of rhythm and revelations.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It shows that the Some Girls era was, and remains, one of the most productive of the Stones' career.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There's more than enough here to disavow thoughts that this is a needless cash grab by Corgan.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Even though other recent interviews and richly realized tracks like those imply that Ocean's songwriting is just a vessel, his own devil is still in the details, and that's what makes his music compelling.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    We now have an album from him so masterful that it'd be greedy to ask for much more.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness doesn't need rose-colored lens for appreciation. The album's success still lies from all the stylistic risks the band assumed, especially in comparison to music other alternative bands were creating at the time.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    m b v creates a new timeline for My Bloody Valentine, and one that recalls the past in a broader and bolder light. They’re better for it, their catalog is stronger for it, and by album’s end, they’re still the best at swirling guitars.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    What makes Rumours so remarkable and relevant is that it remains fragile and passionate 35 years later.... From a historical, archival standpoint, this package is extremely valuable, as Rhino left in the studio banter and rough cuts from the recording sessions; you get to overhear Fleetwood Mac as they make the record.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Yeezus feels very proto- something, the roots of some aesthetic that has yet to be minted. It’s revolutionary at its most urgent, as on “Black Skinhead”.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The 2013 remix is a bit of a wash, if only because the album already sounded great.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Tomorrow’s Hits doesn’t boom like The Men’s early material (namely, 2010’s Immaculada and 2011’s Leave Home), but it’s more rousing instrumentally than last year’s New Moon.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The more you spin it, the more you wear out that thin needle of your record player, you realize that Granduciel is discovering the problems of his life, not figuring them out or even reflecting on them. This all makes for an album that truly sounds like it’s coming to life.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Twenty minutes of pedal-to-the-floor, tension-igniting rock ‘n’ roll can just be too much in most hands, but Here and Nowhere Else condenses these moments into more reasonable servings that are successful across the board.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As perfect as Illmatic is, there are plenty of crevices that can be explored and different musical avenues to test Nas’s verses/scriptures.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    In spite of everything that Oasis would become on record, on stage, in the tabloids, Definitely Maybe stands above it all.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The characters and artifacts that surround these songs feel artificial, like stock props, but the music that Del Rey pulls them through splits them open, shakes them to life.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Basement Tapes Raw, like the original ’75 release, blends brilliant performances with pure curiosities. What’s remarkable, though, are how many beautiful, emotionally daunting moments came into being during these rather informal sessions.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The remastered mixes highlight how incredibly complex the arrangements were originally, a testament to the true magnitude of Led Zeppelin’s vision all those years ago.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Twenty-one years later, Gentlemen remains as much an outlier as ever due to its unlikely fusion of sounds and uncompromising view that breakups are as much about anger and resentment as wallowing and pining. Listen to Gentlemen again, and you’ll find it’s all still “in our heart, in our heads, in our love, and in our beds.”
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Kendrick can’t be Pac or know everything it took to be him, but he isn’t going to let doubts stop him from making groundbreaking music. With To Pimp a Butterfly, it’s never been more apparent that he’s doing just that and prepared to stride past any and all obstacles.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    By forsaking greatness, Stevens has unearthed a wonder altogether more tremendous than the one at the top of those towers he used to stack.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    After one listen or 10, In Colour reflects brightly, a phenomenally poised and universally approachable solo debut.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is music that wants to be read as a text, and deserves to be. The fact that it comes to us in an era of smartphones and shortening attention spans only serves to underscore its audacity.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Lemonade marks Beyoncé’s most accomplished work yet. It is the perfect combination of the sharp songwriting of 4 with the visual storytelling acumen of her self-titled record. Here, we see Beyoncé fully coming into her own: wise, accomplished, and in defense of herself.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    While Coloring Book successfully channels the musical conventions of African-American church tradition without sounding dated or pastiche, the album also subtly chronicles black history and uses it as inspiration for artistic freedom.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    For the first time in a long time, an artist riding on hype surfaced with an album that lives up to the very hype that lifted it. Better yet, in time, Blonde will surpass its hype. The album’s greatest feat is its ability to expand when it’s listened to in a new mindset, each reveal seemingly so apparent that you wonder how you missed it the first time.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Although it’s admittedly a patient listen, Warpaint plucks at a different petal each time through it in its entirety. It’s truly a triumph for a group of women whose colors are singular and run incredibly deep.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    With the stunning Burn Your Fire For No Witness, she deftly captures the terrifying dread of being in limbo, stuck in the sludge of a transitional period. But even with the existential doubt, the loneliness, and the angst, there’s still a resilient beacon of hope.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Her biggest fans may prefer less direct writing, but it makes St. Vincent her most widely appealing album to date, an infectious work that doesn’t ever feel like a compromise.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It’s something special, just like it was always planned to be.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Mirrors, cameras, and lenses are all over Drop, an artistic statement that effectively functions as a screen.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The music might seem cold, but when you’re surrounded by it, enveloped in it, it can keep you warm, too, like a glacier cave or an igloo.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    To Be Kind does as much soul exposure lyrically as it does musically, Gira’s simple, howled lines finding the vein incredibly easily.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    In Conflict is ominous, gloomy, and marked with some of the most playful arrangements Pallett’s laid to date.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Are We There functions best as the portrait of an artist coming into her own, while hopefully putting some of her demons to rest.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Led Zeppelin I is a fantastic glimpse into the time capsule, a standing testament to rock pageantry.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    LZII could’ve used a live version or two to highlight the energy of the late ’60s--an era that remains especially mythical for those of us who weren’t there. As a two-disc set, though, this reissue is both a reminder of the original album’s wallop and a closer look at the alchemy of a band increasingly attuned to ideas of progression.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    While not the towering achievement of its brothers in numerology, Led Zeppelin III remains one of the great albums in rock and roll history, significant for its role in establishing the legend of Led Zeppelin that would become fact with Led Zeppelin IV.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Where the freewheeling Benji painted lyrical autobiographies in painstaking detail and Are We There dove headfirst into dark and sometimes overpowering emotions about toxic relationships, HEAL is a mixture of the two, a cleansing document that’s ultimately more hopeful.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It’s all at once contemporary enough to thrive in a market that demands constant innovation, yet nostalgic enough to shepherd the spirit of a bygone era on which the genre is founded.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Channeling the traditions of Southern music without getting caught up in it, Lateness of Dancers proves the genre’s vitality.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Despite its heightened complexity, Too Bright still fosters an intelligible world where Hadreas can bridge the distance between his vulnerability and self-assuredness.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Dude Incredible, however, is also one of their most direct albums, the nine songs holding that same menacing gut-punch, despite that highfalutin thematic unity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Everything Will Be Alright in the End doesn’t just transport us to Weezer’s younger days--it ushers us into their future. And for the first time in a while, it’s looking pretty bright.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    An album like RTJ2 is rare. Decades from now, this album may just be revered as one of the best hip-hop records of our era, the total synchronicity of two talented artists reaching the apex of their prime.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Xen
    His time alongside Gesaffelstein added to his understanding of the space between beats, and the emotive power of these hesitations.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The remastering of this album is a blessing to the careful compositions and mannered performances throughout the record.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    With Black Messiah, D’Angelo has silenced any doubters and re-confirmed his invitation as the heir apparent to the R&B throne, whether he continues to refuse the honor or not.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    They’ve boiled their process down to its essentials, and No Cities to Love crams genius lyrics and hook after inescapable hook into just 10 tracks and 33 minutes.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Vulnicura is smooth and whole, even as its singer lies shattered.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This is music inspired by what you remember hearing as a kid from your parents’ and grandparents’ record collections, but it’s been made fresh and totally original again.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Tillman’s writing, already literate and caustically funny, has progressed as well as his arrangements.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    On record or in concert, Deacon offers escapism at its finest.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Each of the album’s 10 songs are fully formed and smartly rendered, but “Young Blood” stands out as the most jaw-dropping.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Remastered by Page himself, this is the best digital version of Physical Graffiti available and the definitive way to hear the album if you don’t own a turntable.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    After sees her returning, confidently, to her role as a modern-day pop experimentalist.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Goon vocalizes a timelessness through the mouth of a man playing simply to start over, earnest as he’ll ever be--and getting to hear it from inside the practice room, not outside the door, makes all the difference.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It’s a powerful start to an album where power is par for the course.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This is easily Sun Kil Moon’s most demanding album, with song structures that match the ballsy tangentiality of the lyrics.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Currents is all about the wide lens. It’s not the landscape worth falling in love with, but the way Parker gives us a tour. Let it happen, and it will carry you off somewhere much further away than you realized was worth visiting.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Because it’s loaded with guests, there’s a transparent curatorial awareness to Music Complete, one that’s surprisingly engaging and effective.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Expectations were exceedingly high for Grief’s Infernal Flower, and Windhand delivered a minor masterpiece and the best doom metal album of the year.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Its audacity and stylistic shifts may have resulted in an album that’s not quite as much like coming home as Sunbather, but it shows a genuine and fascinating maturation in a band that deserves to remain in the spotlight for all the right reasons.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    While the individual songs have peaks and purpose, the album winds up functioning on the same level.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    After Visions, the only thing Grimes could do was to grow as big as the landscape around her. Here’s her mountain.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It’s OPN’s most emotional work to date and also his most ridiculous. Its tragedy is bound up with its humor; its sublimity comes from the places where it feels the most broken.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The River Collection isn’t a glimpse of what could have been--it’s raw proof that The River sessions produced too many good songs for one album (even a double album) to contain.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    For its lyrical and musical scope, Malibu brings to mind a number of excellent albums, ranging from Stevie Wonder’s Innervisions to, yes, Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp a Butterfly.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Standards is by far the most bombastic album of Into It. Over It.’s career.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Potential not only makes a shockingly strong case for the top tier of contemporary sample-indebted achievements (alongside pillars including Burial’s Rival Dealer EP and Jamie xx’s In Colour), but does so while insisting that the universe, much like ourselves, will never be explored in its entirety.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Luckily, Hecker has impeccable taste. Very few composers can achieve this kind of beauty or this kind of experimentation, and yet Hecker does both, time and time again.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Gore could be the Deftones’ best album, but you can earnestly say that about any album they’ve ever created and make a strong argument. If anything, it’s the most modern, and a statement that style and substance are not mutually exclusive. Gore has both.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    For so long, ANOHNI had felt like a supernatural force, of this world but able to see a thread of love and hope through all the sadness. By expressing the grimmest realities, that thread becomes harder and harder to find. But ANOHNI’s music makes that struggle all the more powerful.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    As with anyone complaining of love lost between pleas for it to return, it begins to become tiresome — no matter how smooth your voice may be. But Blake manages to make a whopping 17-song album transition seamlessly, holding your attention thanks to a careful execution of space between those very keys.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Waiting five years to hear previously released tracks is worth it precisely because Radiohead finally feels connected enough to perform them with meaning.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    There are fewer moments of complete chaos, giving over instead to more detailed-oriented dissections of experiences from puberty. While this might sound like dangerous territory for an artist who’s known for searing riffs and vicious live performances that include screaming into the pickups of her guitar, Mitski uses her voice to measure the slightest nuances within complex emotions.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Freetown Sound stands concurrently as a deeply personal work and a striking representation of the struggles present in today’s society.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It’s hard and sinister like a gangster rap album, but it’s also sprawling and even psychedelic at times. Nothing else sounds like it, and that’s a joy to behold.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This is music that also stands on its own, a work by turns eerie and sparse, but also tinged in the warm nostalgia of bike rides at dusk and the loyalty of friends.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Although her bio insists that the narratives within the record aren’t intended to comment on gender roles, My Woman strikes down the notion that neither Olsen’s artistry nor her womanhood can be limited.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Though the album came out of the same sessions as last year’s looser, wilder, and intentionally irreverent Star Wars, there’s now a deliberate quietness and gentleness to the core instrumentation.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The music’s vision and beauty hold together regardless, a sturdy and unparalleled step of confidence.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Using his remaining time, he’s not only putting his house in order, he’s tidying up ours too. You Want It Darker prepares us for his departure and, in turn, shows us how it’s done, so we have a road map--pockmarked by land mines as it is--in place when we reach that stage.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Dixon and Stein’s music is a chance to revisit it, to envelop ourselves in its arms (or claws), and to bask in the glory of something supremely strange and wonderful.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    By and large, We got it from Here… has the classic Tribe sound: a warm and crisp confluence of East Coast hip-hop, jazz, and more, all mixed and mastered impeccably. While some aspects of the sound are dated, others feel fresh.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They [Ghostface and Wu-Tang Clan] are truly a hip-hop enigma, and Apollo Kids is just another piece of proof.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a high-personality disc, one that avoids cliches and cheese while also being steeped in tradition and an immense dose of adorableness.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Kaputt is the sort of record that arrives only once in a while: an expansive world that captivates you from beginning to end, impresses you with its self-awareness and cohesiveness, then releases you from its grasp when it's all over.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In fact, it's very hard to determine what the actual standout from this album will be, because literally every track is full to the absolute brim with the genius of seasoned veterans
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Anyone can recreate a sound, but Yuck succeeds where most bands fail by digging under the surface to capture the spirit and magic that made the music of their beloved idols possible.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This complete command over their craft really sets these Orange County natives apart, resulting in the kind of record that grabs you at first listen and becomes more meaningful every time through.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    To date, the Foo Fighters have never tried to reinvent the wheel, per se; they just want to keep it rolling. And that's just what Wasting Light does. For that purpose, Foo Fighters give us a solid record from open to close. The drought is over. Rock is back.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Whichever route you choose, one thing remains unflinching: this album is guaranteed to please.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's an album that makes you sad that it's not longer; sad that it can't just go on forever. This sentiment alone should indicate the caliber of album Fleet Foxes have created in Helplessness Blues.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Director's Cut can be seen as new work, because some of these songs are very different to their earlier versions in tone and scale; both sets of work are equally brilliant, but here there is even more clarity of purpose,
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album is a shoo-in for being a timeless great, no matter what we say. Vernon's got the magic touch. But it's lacking that original sense of urgency that flowed so freely in and out of For Emma, making it so genuine and so incredibly listenable.