Consequence of Sound's Scores

  • Music
For 2,595 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Siamese Dream [Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 10 BAYTL
Score distribution:
2,595 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Mirrors, cameras, and lenses are all over Drop, an artistic statement that effectively functions as a screen.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The music might seem cold, but when you’re surrounded by it, enveloped in it, it can keep you warm, too, like a glacier cave or an igloo.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    To Be Kind does as much soul exposure lyrically as it does musically, Gira’s simple, howled lines finding the vein incredibly easily.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    In Conflict is ominous, gloomy, and marked with some of the most playful arrangements Pallett’s laid to date.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Are We There functions best as the portrait of an artist coming into her own, while hopefully putting some of her demons to rest.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Led Zeppelin I is a fantastic glimpse into the time capsule, a standing testament to rock pageantry.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    LZII could’ve used a live version or two to highlight the energy of the late ’60s--an era that remains especially mythical for those of us who weren’t there. As a two-disc set, though, this reissue is both a reminder of the original album’s wallop and a closer look at the alchemy of a band increasingly attuned to ideas of progression.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    While not the towering achievement of its brothers in numerology, Led Zeppelin III remains one of the great albums in rock and roll history, significant for its role in establishing the legend of Led Zeppelin that would become fact with Led Zeppelin IV.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Where the freewheeling Benji painted lyrical autobiographies in painstaking detail and Are We There dove headfirst into dark and sometimes overpowering emotions about toxic relationships, HEAL is a mixture of the two, a cleansing document that’s ultimately more hopeful.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It’s all at once contemporary enough to thrive in a market that demands constant innovation, yet nostalgic enough to shepherd the spirit of a bygone era on which the genre is founded.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Channeling the traditions of Southern music without getting caught up in it, Lateness of Dancers proves the genre’s vitality.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Despite its heightened complexity, Too Bright still fosters an intelligible world where Hadreas can bridge the distance between his vulnerability and self-assuredness.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Dude Incredible, however, is also one of their most direct albums, the nine songs holding that same menacing gut-punch, despite that highfalutin thematic unity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Everything Will Be Alright in the End doesn’t just transport us to Weezer’s younger days--it ushers us into their future. And for the first time in a while, it’s looking pretty bright.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    An album like RTJ2 is rare. Decades from now, this album may just be revered as one of the best hip-hop records of our era, the total synchronicity of two talented artists reaching the apex of their prime.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Xen
    His time alongside Gesaffelstein added to his understanding of the space between beats, and the emotive power of these hesitations.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The remastering of this album is a blessing to the careful compositions and mannered performances throughout the record.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    With Black Messiah, D’Angelo has silenced any doubters and re-confirmed his invitation as the heir apparent to the R&B throne, whether he continues to refuse the honor or not.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    They’ve boiled their process down to its essentials, and No Cities to Love crams genius lyrics and hook after inescapable hook into just 10 tracks and 33 minutes.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Vulnicura is smooth and whole, even as its singer lies shattered.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This is music inspired by what you remember hearing as a kid from your parents’ and grandparents’ record collections, but it’s been made fresh and totally original again.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Tillman’s writing, already literate and caustically funny, has progressed as well as his arrangements.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    On record or in concert, Deacon offers escapism at its finest.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Each of the album’s 10 songs are fully formed and smartly rendered, but “Young Blood” stands out as the most jaw-dropping.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Remastered by Page himself, this is the best digital version of Physical Graffiti available and the definitive way to hear the album if you don’t own a turntable.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    After sees her returning, confidently, to her role as a modern-day pop experimentalist.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Goon vocalizes a timelessness through the mouth of a man playing simply to start over, earnest as he’ll ever be--and getting to hear it from inside the practice room, not outside the door, makes all the difference.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It’s a powerful start to an album where power is par for the course.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This is easily Sun Kil Moon’s most demanding album, with song structures that match the ballsy tangentiality of the lyrics.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They [Ghostface and Wu-Tang Clan] are truly a hip-hop enigma, and Apollo Kids is just another piece of proof.