Consequence of Sound's Scores

  • Music
For 2,422 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Channel Orange
Lowest review score: 10 BAYTL
Score distribution:
2,422 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    In Conflict is ominous, gloomy, and marked with some of the most playful arrangements Pallett’s laid to date.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Are We There functions best as the portrait of an artist coming into her own, while hopefully putting some of her demons to rest.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Led Zeppelin I is a fantastic glimpse into the time capsule, a standing testament to rock pageantry.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    LZII could’ve used a live version or two to highlight the energy of the late ’60s--an era that remains especially mythical for those of us who weren’t there. As a two-disc set, though, this reissue is both a reminder of the original album’s wallop and a closer look at the alchemy of a band increasingly attuned to ideas of progression.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    While not the towering achievement of its brothers in numerology, Led Zeppelin III remains one of the great albums in rock and roll history, significant for its role in establishing the legend of Led Zeppelin that would become fact with Led Zeppelin IV.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Where the freewheeling Benji painted lyrical autobiographies in painstaking detail and Are We There dove headfirst into dark and sometimes overpowering emotions about toxic relationships, HEAL is a mixture of the two, a cleansing document that’s ultimately more hopeful.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It’s all at once contemporary enough to thrive in a market that demands constant innovation, yet nostalgic enough to shepherd the spirit of a bygone era on which the genre is founded.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Channeling the traditions of Southern music without getting caught up in it, Lateness of Dancers proves the genre’s vitality.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Despite its heightened complexity, Too Bright still fosters an intelligible world where Hadreas can bridge the distance between his vulnerability and self-assuredness.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Dude Incredible, however, is also one of their most direct albums, the nine songs holding that same menacing gut-punch, despite that highfalutin thematic unity.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Everything Will Be Alright in the End doesn’t just transport us to Weezer’s younger days--it ushers us into their future. And for the first time in a while, it’s looking pretty bright.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    An album like RTJ2 is rare. Decades from now, this album may just be revered as one of the best hip-hop records of our era, the total synchronicity of two talented artists reaching the apex of their prime.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Xen
    His time alongside Gesaffelstein added to his understanding of the space between beats, and the emotive power of these hesitations.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The remastering of this album is a blessing to the careful compositions and mannered performances throughout the record.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    With Black Messiah, D’Angelo has silenced any doubters and re-confirmed his invitation as the heir apparent to the R&B throne, whether he continues to refuse the honor or not.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    They’ve boiled their process down to its essentials, and No Cities to Love crams genius lyrics and hook after inescapable hook into just 10 tracks and 33 minutes.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Vulnicura is smooth and whole, even as its singer lies shattered.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This is music inspired by what you remember hearing as a kid from your parents’ and grandparents’ record collections, but it’s been made fresh and totally original again.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Tillman’s writing, already literate and caustically funny, has progressed as well as his arrangements.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    On record or in concert, Deacon offers escapism at its finest.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Each of the album’s 10 songs are fully formed and smartly rendered, but “Young Blood” stands out as the most jaw-dropping.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Remastered by Page himself, this is the best digital version of Physical Graffiti available and the definitive way to hear the album if you don’t own a turntable.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They [Ghostface and Wu-Tang Clan] are truly a hip-hop enigma, and Apollo Kids is just another piece of proof.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a high-personality disc, one that avoids cliches and cheese while also being steeped in tradition and an immense dose of adorableness.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Kaputt is the sort of record that arrives only once in a while: an expansive world that captivates you from beginning to end, impresses you with its self-awareness and cohesiveness, then releases you from its grasp when it's all over.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In fact, it's very hard to determine what the actual standout from this album will be, because literally every track is full to the absolute brim with the genius of seasoned veterans
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Anyone can recreate a sound, but Yuck succeeds where most bands fail by digging under the surface to capture the spirit and magic that made the music of their beloved idols possible.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This complete command over their craft really sets these Orange County natives apart, resulting in the kind of record that grabs you at first listen and becomes more meaningful every time through.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    To date, the Foo Fighters have never tried to reinvent the wheel, per se; they just want to keep it rolling. And that's just what Wasting Light does. For that purpose, Foo Fighters give us a solid record from open to close. The drought is over. Rock is back.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Whichever route you choose, one thing remains unflinching: this album is guaranteed to please.