Consequence of Sound's Scores

  • Music
For 2,461 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Channel Orange
Lowest review score: 10 BAYTL
Score distribution:
2,461 music reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's a consistent intensity and power in Oh No's production.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Slinky enough for the club, down-tempo enough for a rooftop soiree, Settle traverses boundaries and expectations.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Morning Phase makes for an interesting return to form.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While it's still a worthy comeback for a band way past its prime, Researching the Blues is similarly only a few solid tracks away from greatness.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Inheritors jumps and squeals and writhes and blossoms. It’s music that you can’t help but hear as if you were a kid again.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is Nas' strongest album in 18 years and three months--yes, since his debut album Illmatic.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It’s not as fun as 2007’s Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga or 2005’s Gimme Fiction, but it’s just as punchy, while also sticking with the ambition that made Transference arguably so intriguing despite its muddled demeanor.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even the sharpest pain, the deepest hell can be survived, and Abandon is a reminder of that.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Cold Spring lives on contrast, on stitching together mismatched parts into living mutants. It’s less whole than Crooks & Lovers, less content with the lines drawn around it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Wye Oak should be highly commended for expanding their already strong sound. Let's just hope they leave in a tad more of their younger selves next time around.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Punish, Honey moves forward powered by the tension between what it keeps hidden and what little it shows.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    R Plus Seven might be the first album to crystallize the simultaneous joy and terror inherent in a life of constant connection and constant surveillance.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Short Movie lacks the seamless thematic and tonal cohesion of Once I Was An Eagle, but it offers more immediate pleasures.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Richly arranged, masterfully sequenced, and full of brooding, Push the Sky Away combines the stately beauty of The Boatman’s Call and No More Shall We Part with the intensity of Grinderman/Lazarus-era Cave while managing to sound like neither.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As always, Kinsella comes across as well-read, thoughtful, and concerned, reflecting the veteran musician’s early Cap’n Jazz days as much as his new fatherhood.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Whether or not you’re willing to put in the time, Lese Majesty holds attention as soon as opener “Dawn in Luxor” kicks in. That’s plenty to like.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rather than be pulled into the darkness, Harris boldly searches for meaning in this gorgeously reproduced world.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Channeling the traditions of Southern music without getting caught up in it, Lateness of Dancers proves the genre’s vitality.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Futuristic and still visceral, even sexual, Movement's strength gleans itself from the subtleties.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    he songs are tighter and leaner than on Mines ("One Horse" throws off the mean), rarely wandering, with lyrical themes prevalent rather than all-consuming.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Beneath the lyrics live a less-than-cohesive batch of songs. But when the band allows each track a little more breathing room, they show some growth and have a good time doing it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s a cagey, manic record that tethers the band’s new-American muscle to Cox’s longstanding self-immolation.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Allelujah!'s defiance of strictures of classic post-rock cinematic crescendos, or extended kraut-rock grooves, or popular musical modes and tonalities are what makes it work more as political album than it does as a traditional emotional one.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Maraqopa spans genres, production techniques, and songwriting styles, all while retaining an overarching and unifying aesthetic: a cohesive haze of distance.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    James Blake is an essential for anybody interested in witnessing how pop music can and will continue to change, progress, and grow into something new with time.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Water Liars’ songwriting has been compared to veterans such as Dawes, Grizzly Bear, and even Fleet Foxes, but their sophomore effort, Wyoming, has more mental meandering and grit than all of the above.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While it's more "mainstream" musically, its subtlety will still melt faces.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Another Self Portrait is highlighted by songs we’ve heard before but present here in different versions.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It weaves a pleasingly expanded set of instruments and styles, all under the watchful eye of producer Mike Mogis.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It’s all at once contemporary enough to thrive in a market that demands constant innovation, yet nostalgic enough to shepherd the spirit of a bygone era on which the genre is founded.