Consequence of Sound's Scores

For 3,418 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Blonde
Lowest review score: 10 BAYTL
Score distribution:
3418 music reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Revolution Radio plods its way down roads the band first stomped on years ago. In a career filled with euphoric highs and honorable lows, this might be the first album that sits exactly on the middle of the scale, dipping its toes into every possible outcome but refusing to dive in and embrace either comfort or chaos.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Oberst is best when his guard is down, and this album takes seven songs for that to finally happen.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The transitional record nails the discomfort of feeling out of place or unsure of yourself. Imperfect but impassioned, Joyce Manor astutely capture uncertainty and anxiety throughout Cody.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Big Boat, is wonderfully accessible thanks to its relatable sense of communal fun, as well as the band’s own self-awareness.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Jaar has signature tones--every musician does, and it’s hard to escape them--but he steps past expectations to make a political statement that’s still subdued, jaunty, and sharp.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The interludes are all derived from the same sonic template as the songs, so the borders between tracks can be hazy, giving the album a meandering feel. That said, ultimately there’s something refreshing about Solange’s dreary, almost funereal compositions.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    None of the material on The Altar will revolutionize alt R&B, future soul, or whatever awkward label one might apply to this nebulous genre. What is here, though, is proof of an artist still searching for a new direction.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    These songs aren’t for everyone, but they stand as some of the most fearlessly created music of the year--even if Brown sometimes sounds petrified for his life.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    There are few sonic commonalities between the texture-oriented Love Remains--an album a lot of people loved--and Care. Objectively, though, this is a thoughtful, sincere pop R&B record that at times reaches Krell’s intended gorgeous heights.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    While the no-bullshit lyrics and get-in, get-out nature of American Band work to make the band’s politics perfectly clear (at 47 minutes, it’s a contender for DBT’s shortest LP), it still has unique lyrical details that separate it from other protest music, even protest music of the loud and pissed-off variety.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The music’s vision and beauty hold together regardless, a sturdy and unparalleled step of confidence.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    RR7349 is a more complex affair than Stein and Dixon’s work on Stranger Things and for obvious reasons, above all being the involvement of Adam Jones and Mark Donica.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    With Remember Us to Life, Spektor foregoes some of the whimsical narratives on previous albums and digs back into more personal thoughts, showcasing her inimitable vocals and piano talents.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    All that’s left to do is to approach the album the way you would modern art at a museum: with open ears, curious eyes, and a desire to exit with a newfound ability to find beauty in most everything around you.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The return to familiarity is a welcome one.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The production ranges from icy to neon. And yet these tracks all clearly feel cut from a single cloth. The Healing Component evolves Jenkins’ worldview boldly, keeping his messages easy to digest but bursting with meaning.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Chapter and Verse--familiar as it is--also has an ace in the hole that just barely keeps it from being a shameless cash grab: the inclusion of five previously unreleased songs.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    For now, as a clue, we have this album of nuances, a revue of a career, where the delight is consistently in the details, some of them random, and others masterfully intentional.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    While Head Carrier may fall far short of lightning bolts raining down from Olympus, there’s enough reason to believe Pixies have a bit of thunder in them yet.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    I Had a Dream You Were Mine overflows with satisfying and complex melodic shape.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    With so many co-existing styles, what could have been a disjointed listen is reigned in thanks to intelligent songwriting, contemporary production, and, most importantly, an intensity that elevates everything with impenetrable confidence and cool.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    For those who have paid close attention to the band’s evolution, it seemed inevitable that he would get to this point. Accordingly, A Corpse Wired for Sound feels like a culmination.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    These songs, plus several others, are ultimately frustrating because they never achieve Die Antwoord’s self-professed new direction. Even more frustrating, the few tracks that try something different end up being some of the group’s strongest material to date.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The Sides and in Between is an honest attempt at reviving rock ‘n’ roll, transforming it without the cheesy “those were the days” vibe.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Much of what makes Touché Amoré a success remains intact: the band jamming away behind Bolm, supporting and expanding his “slam poetry.” But, oh what wonderful poetry it has become, as Bolm dives into the depths of his cortex as he comes to terms with the death of his mother in 2014.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It’s this fusion of generations that partly makes Loud Bash such a fresh and exciting record. There’s plenty of Replacements hero worship going on with the loud, tumbling arrangements and sweeping vocal hooks, but that’s what being a teenager is all about.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The album could offer some really tender moments, but because they’re buried under lyrics that talk about nothing but sex, they’re lost. Instead, The Divine Feminine leaves a sour taste behind and entirely misses an opportunity to truly honor the female gender.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Deap Vally are most compelling when they dig further than irreverently dismissing superficial, mainstreamed feminism, but rather go on to explore what makes modern womanhood disturbing or even terrifying, the omnipresent eye of patriarchy be damned.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    As an artist, he needed to release the record in just this way in order to process his pain. Skeleton Tree was released for us, but it’s for him.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Preoccupations does away with the murkiness, sounding remarkably clear in contrast to its predecessor.