Consequence of Sound's Scores

  • Music
For 2,360 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Led Zeppelin IV [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 10 BAYTL
Score distribution:
2,360 music reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Making pain sound pretty and poetic is a tough tightrope to walk, but Kozelek once again takes all the right steps.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Morning Phase makes for an interesting return to form.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    While much of contemporary folk lacks the political bite of Woody Guthrie or Pete Seeger, Segarra, who identifies as queer and listened to Bikini Kill growing up, brings a progressive and empathetic mindset.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    With 12 songs that clock in at under 30 minutes, You’re Gonna Miss It All is a brisk listen that only lags once or twice.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The chords and arrangements on Atlas are the densest Real Estate have ever attempted, shading their sunshine into something palpably more mysterious, like a sunset in inclement weather.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Hardly a cookie-cutter pop voice, she’s brash but not abrasive and can be sultry without being hammy. Those songs showcase the versatility of her croon, while also updating the pop ballad form with Vindhahl’s metallic, glitchy production.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Piñata comes with just enough to reduce the daunting 17-track length to a non-factor, although it drags a bit with overt nostalgia toward the fourth quarter.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It’s Album Time finds Todd Terje shattering dance music stereotypes.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Future’s sophomore LP is a raw interpretation of his heartfelt musings filtered through an audio processor and laid bare at the intersection of trap rap and synth R&B. It’s a fascinating foray into alternative trap that ambitiously pushes the limits of self-expression and transmission.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Turn Blue, though, is the sound of Auerbach and Carney eagerly and grandiosely taking things into their own (and, if you want, Burton’s) hands.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Refractory Obdurate sounds a clamorous warning that something is nigh. Rather than a direct message, Edwards offers only a shatter of brimstone pieces.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Overall, Do It Again feels like an exploration for all involved, and even manages to address gender politics in discreet but intriguing ways.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Even if the method of delivery is not the most effective, it’s a positive thing for both artist and listener to be pushing further, trying harder, and exploring uncomfortable, new terrain. Ignoring that would be a mistake.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    There’s little that’s playful inside Superunknown. It sounds more like Black Sabbath running for their lives, about to crack under the pressure, but then, at the last minute, escaping--and thriving.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    They’ve always done an exceptional job of bucking irony and sticking to their own earnest agenda, and this latest effort is no different; you’d be hard-pressed to find anything within a stone’s throw of a radio hit among these nine tracks, but you will find a smooth, almost flawlessly cohesive whole.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    This is a moody, angry, and soulful export from what modern anthropology insists is a happy-go-lucky area--Denmark.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    When you listen to 1000 Forms of Fear and hear the real pain in her beautiful, guttural vocal hiccups, it doesn’t feel like a voyeuristic experience but, rather, like an old friend’s new hurting or your own past mistakes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Alvvays has legitimately great songs, boasting sharp lyrics, comforting arrangements, and tics that give their music personality that can’t happen too deliberately.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Whether or not you’re willing to put in the time, Lese Majesty holds attention as soon as opener “Dawn in Luxor” kicks in. That’s plenty to like.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It’s not as fun as 2007’s Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga or 2005’s Gimme Fiction, but it’s just as punchy, while also sticking with the ambition that made Transference arguably so intriguing despite its muddled demeanor.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    LP1
    LP1 isn’t anything revolutionary; it’s a frankly expressed project focused on the dualism between love and lust, reality and fantasy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Despite its title, which could suggest some sort of nostalgic exercise, Experiments in Time succeeds because it’s not concerned with channeling any particular time whatsoever.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    All of these techniques--the streamlined mixing, the honeycombed harmonies, the poppy sci-fi synths--build a sonic unity made all the more bright when surrounded by the irreverent lyrics.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Part of the success of After the End lies in its seamless and smart sequencing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Channeling profound loss, once-buried emotions, and a stronger sense of songwriting, these Staten Islanders have created something cathartic, life-affirming, and important.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    His new album and second with Chicago’s Bloodshot Records, The No-Hit Wonder, is brimming with vivid and infectious songwriting.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Mean Love is all about precision, be it in the form of a buttery vocal hook, an elastic bass line courtesy of Ish Montgomery, or a poignant lyric co-written with Greg Lofaro. In other words, it feels like this journeyman has finally arrived.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Though the overall sound of Ryan Adams may be a mask, hiding lyrics that are every bit as heartbroken, confused, lost, and struggling as ever.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The resulting sound pieces are still intricately weird and weirdly intricate, and if Anchor sacrifices some of the hushed intimacy of a Books record (see: Zammuto’s self-consciously rock delivery on “IO” or the raw and lurching snare sound on the great “Sinker”), it retains the promise that anything, and any sound, is momentarily possible within these musical boundaries.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    James has primed the Aphex Twin for its next metamorphosis--one that has promised to be more combustible than the beats that ground SYRO.