Consequence of Sound's Scores

  • Music
For 2,174 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy
Lowest review score: 10 BAYTL
Score distribution:
2,174 music reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some could argue that the Cool Kids abandoned their original minimalism on When Fish Ride Bicycles. However, they've contemporized their old-school influences for a wider audience. By incorporating both well-known names and lesser-known artists, the Cool Kids are finally in a position to get major exposure.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While little of the album bears the immediate impact of Zomby's best work ("Tears in the Rain," "Spliff Dub"), this latest offering from the spectral producer proves much more enduring a record than he seemed capable of a couple of years back and one that makes as solid a case as is imaginable for integrating dubstep into the mainstream as one of the genre's first great releases on a label not named Hyperdub or NinjaTune.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Giving the Just Once EP a listen should quell any doubts regarding his versatility, because it's almost like hearing How to Dress Well again for the first time.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    After 41 minutes, Leave Home doesn't linger like a flashback, it sticks like a demented structure that's mysteriously magnetic and, in the end, really fun. No wonder this stuff is addictive.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The sheer quality that Red Hot + Rio 2 maintains over the course of its two discs and 33 tracks makes this a very noteworthy effort.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Influence-dropping aside, Dom excels at their particular brand of synthetically nostalgic, lyrically self-aware ear candy, even if they're not covering new ground.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If anything, the extras better inform the choices eventually made on the band's debut, highlighting just how great a record it turned out to be (since, basically, they'd been doing it from song one). Put simply, Icky Mettle is a gem of early '90s rock worthy of a place in the indie Smithsonian.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although the most audible change between Beauregard and Red Velvet is the newfound immediacy of the instrumentation and the explosive collaborative spirit, Singh's refreshingly strong vocal performance is equally as important.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In its totality, Haven exhibits an effortless balance between hip hop and Borth's archetypically haunting, transcendent aural backdrops.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Any listener that's ever heard a twinkly-guitar emo/screamo band and found its vocals a bit melodramatic and its arrangements boring should give The Appleseed Cast an honest shot.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While it's a rippin' windows-down Boss tune, the ragged production and especially the 30 second fadeout sound incongruent with the rest of the album's humming undertones. Despite that, the album still rides like a dream along the freeway and blazes forward on its own path more than it follows in the footsteps of the others.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a complex, fascinating record that punches the shoulder for attention.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A Creature I Don't Know stands up well against its feted predecessor and can only add to Laura Marling's reputation as a songwriter and musician.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The flowing, multivalent music helps to keep things out of the monotonous emotional doldrums, but Lambert's slow, building, prying questions truly force the listener to examine every bit of the album and the self.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album that captures one of indie rock's longstanding heroes still at the top of his game.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Instead of guitar worship, Active Child's generation of fey Romantics have suckled on synthesizer worship, more varied sounds, and a post-"Planet Rock" planet where electronica and rap/R&B music interweave constantly.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The best thing about the collection is the way it reminds us that Merritt is a Janus-like songwriter, looking backwards and forwards, and while we can see influences from the past, there is also the sense that Merritt has often looked into the future.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You can't help but move along to some of the entrancing, pulsing drones found on Ancient Romans; altogether, another epic, grandiose, striking LP from one of the best and most underrated musicians of the moment.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album could have gone a bit smoother or carried a simpler, more cohesive theme, but at the end of the day, Cymbals Eat Guitars have succeeded in creating one of the year's most surprisingly transcendental sophomore albums.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On their new LP Program 91, Razika manages to find the best in the word "inoffensive," producing an album that is the definition of an easy listen, while also managing not to leave listeners feeling as if their time has been wasted in any way.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She is an artist that defines edge, pulsing with an energy that no other musician could duplicate, delivering images and lines that no one else would have imagined.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the ridiculously high highs of this album, it fails to maintain a great pace throughout. It struggles back and forth between "good" and "great," whereas its foregoer grabbed "great" by the balls on the first track and never let go.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Father, Son, Holy Ghost succeeds thoroughly at nearly everything it does, expanding Owens and JR White's palette beyond the scope of the duo's debut without going too far out on a limb.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Peter Wolf Crier may have arrived at the end of its tour burned out, but by the conclusion of their second album, the duo has evolved a more coherent signature sound.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Era Extraña sports the admirable trait of being so much like many of the best psychedelic pop records in recent memory (Oracular Spectaular pops to mind rather often), while going a long way in forging Neon Indian's own, very distinct musical identity.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Larry "Ler" LaLonde plays his complimentary role so well it's scary, Claypool has never sounded better, and Jay Lane jumps back onto the train before it goes a-chuggin' without him again.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album itself is worthy of praise from any angle you choose to view it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    LP number four adds the Kasabian touch to other genres in an electrifying scattershot that still feels coherent and whole.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Megafaun shines the brightest on thematic tracks like "Scorned," in which you can practically feel the dust clouds after each harmonica blast and the heat shimmering in the vibrating background guitars.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Devil's Walk is not an attempt at a new sound. It's an exposition of how to create a new sound and how to do it at a level that connects with the listener.