Consequence of Sound's Scores

  • Music
For 2,363 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness [Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 10 BAYTL
Score distribution:
2,363 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    The songs, sonically and structurally, don’t sound contemporary at all. At best, they sound like disco by way of these two artists, both of whom have been making similar songs for five, maybe ten years.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Maybe it’s because we’ve grown accustomed to Cudi’s style and the influence it’s had over other artists, but at this point, it just sounds a little bit stale.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    For someone who records under his own name and not that of a collective, Croll remains a mystery, a patchwork of influences content to blend in, not to stand out.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Equally appropriately, with increased attention comes increased expectations and increased scrutiny, neither of which are met by this sophomore release.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    What The Cautionary Tales needs is a prudent pruning. This album struggles to appear deeper than a common puddle.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    It’s best to approach The Knife’s Shaken-Up Versions with caution, even though the blade has dulled this time around.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Jungle is a polished debut, but there’s no sense that J and T (or whoever is actually singing here) feel any sort of commitment to their lyrics, their arrangements, or anything beyond producing neatly packaged songs that slide them into festival slots.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    We Are Only What We Feel, if you go in expecting very little, can provide some background noise pleasure. But it only lights up for three seconds at a time. And then it’s trash.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 33 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, Hold My Home is not another baby step in the right direction, but rather a collection of slack-jawed tunes surrounding one or two borderline gems.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Boys and Diamonds ends up being hindered by the the same awkward, mock-ethnic yelps the duo seems to feel the need for on every other song they cut and the empty, tinny nonsense they seem to arrive at all too often as they attempt to craft memorable pop.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It's always admirable when an artist or a band attempts to create a piece of music that differs from what came before. Unfortunately for Architecture in Helsinki, their new work fails as a cohesive whole, salvaged only by two or three songs here and there.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Morrison has a talented voice, but you might as well stick to Glee to hear it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The reissue of BlackenedWhite comes as a missed opportunity. Odd Future followers will likely have grabbed the expanded (and notably better) version when it was available free online a few months back; newcomers to the collective's output have better entry points elsewhere in their continuously-growing catalog.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    This CD is worse than a nu-metal reprise, in that it doesn't give true ragers an outlet, but instead facilitates the same false machismo that tribal tats and fake bench-press numbers suggest.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Lulu is essentially a piece of shock art that's littered with vulgarity both lyrical and musical.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It's the uninspired and homogenous manner in which Joker goes about ironing out nearly everything that made his tunes memorable to begin with that makes The Vision one of the most disappointing debuts of the year.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    When you boil it down, Purple Naked Ladies' biggest fault is that it's generic.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    A deluge of whining that's lyrically incomprehensible and becomes sonically dull after one song.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Victory isn't going to blow your mind by any means, but it's the first time in a long time a Wu-Tang brother has stumbled.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    [A] superficial lack of organization and purpose.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    An album desperate for texture, flavor, and risks, Giant Orange is the aural equivalent of middle-of-the-road musical tragedy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Parts of Anarchy, My Dear feel so unedited that it gets a little embarrassing for the listener, but when Say Anything collects itself, it has something to say.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Rather than bursting forth with something new and unique, they wind up rehashing stale sounds and leaving the listener with an entirely unmemorable experience.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The album is at its best when guests take the microphone and falls short nearly everywhere else.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It's unclear what the band has been doing during its lengthy hiatus (their last full-length was released in 2002), but keeping up with current music trends was evidently not on the to-do list.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    All Information Retrieved provides is leaking creative inertia.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    DeLonge's forgettable chord progressions feel like an afterthought to lyrics that try too hard to fit into Blink's more morbid adult persona of late.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    ["Dirty Laundry" is] so raw and visceral that we finely see her as intended: vulnerable, flawed, and totally real. She tries replicating that authenticity, but there’s only the uber-cliché “I don’t care; we’re over” anthem “Gone” and the album’s superficially enjoyable title track, which Rowland approaches with some intriguing level of nuance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Of course, it doesn’t make sense for Stewart to try to stand toe-to-toe with Simone’s vocals, but the close-mic’d, barely there vocal performance offered on Nina is a tragedy for a man who is a talented singer in his own right.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Rather than provide a solution, or even insight into the Internet reality, Gambino simply adds to the frustrations. The big reveal at the album’s conclusion is that he was (likely) trolling all the trolls, but what about the fans?