Country Weekly's Scores

  • Music
For 150 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 74% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 24% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 79
Highest review score: 100 Bootleg, Vol. 3: Live Around the World
Lowest review score: 42 Spring Break... Checkin' Out
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 150
150 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bocephus-like clarinets, old-timey lyrics and Toby's smooth-as-whiskey delivery assure purists that there is still Hope for classic barroom singalongs.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Easton gives fans of traditional country everything they've been missing.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The project truly succeeds because of the various voices in The SteelDrivers, who consider their bluegrass to be one painted from a darker palette--which, at times, can feel a little too dark.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Emmylou and Rodney seem at their best with the more up-tempo offerings like Kris Kristofferson’s “Chase the Feeling” and “Bluebird Wine,” which features Rodney’s playful vocals.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    There’s a common theme of relationships among many of the songs, with the ballads “Lonely Tonight” and “Anyone Else” coming away as the strongest of the bunch.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Kill the Lights isn’t consistently pleasing, but it does represent a progression and evolution from Luke’s previous material.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Carrie’s never been in better voice, but a little more control in the production would have served her well.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While Taylor turns her wrath on a woman who steals her man on "Better Than Revenge," she turns that critical eye on herself in "Back to December," a thorough apology to a former lover she regrets having left behind. Other tunes, such as "Mean" and "Sparks Fly," suffer from generic and sometimes underdeveloped lyrics.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Quietly and artfully, if not especially dynamically, McKenna unearths striking truths about the fragility of life and relationships.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sara's pop-country sound is rich Southern comfort, delivered organically and with authenticity.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Overall, Josh's sound boasts enough twang to keep it country and enough soulful passion to keep things interesting.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The disc reveals a few hard edges but offers optimism even as it explores the thornier corners of human behavior.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Both the chestnuts and The Band selections here sound best in their original versions (partly due to the diminished power of Levon's voice after his bout with throat cancer). But his singing brims with spirit, and he and his cohorts deliver these mostly vintage tunes with gusto.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Country music as pure as the kind heard on Rare Bird Alert is rare indeed, and worthy of consideration--even if it does come from a pretty odd duck.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    True to form, his major-label debut is a personal, understated and unpredictable collection.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The turquoise-hued bluegrass offered here is anything but generic--it's specialty-shop stuff.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While it lacks the emotional heft of Merle's acclaimed 2010 album, I Am What I Am, the cancer survivor's latest album boasts plenty of flinty independence.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Overall, a solid debut from a young, still-maturing artist.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite the album's title, she plays it safe rather than wild.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Hitting a sweet spot between honky-tonk and the more sophisticated Nashville Sound of yore, Long Line of Heartaches delivers unapologetically traditional fare without resorting to self-conscious nostalgia.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Joe is at his best on the traditional romps like "This Ole Boy" and "No Truck, No Boat, No Girl."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you've ever been worried that good old Southern-fried boogie is an endangered species, then Dixie Lullabies should help you rest a little easier.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Only a real party-pooper would deny Guy's talented pals the chance to respectfully demonstrate how well this stuff still works.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Release Me provides a clear picture of Lovett's stylistic bedrock, and reminds that he's stood steadfast upon it all along.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While the album lacks some of the energy and freshness of 2010's Nothing Like This, introspective tunes such as "A Little Home," "Sunrise" (co-written by Joe Don) and the Lady Antebellum-esque "Come Wake Me Up" add even more depth to the trio's sound.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Heroes indicates that the future is in good hands.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    His label home may have changed, but his everyman approach to songwriting holds steady.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Collectively, they touch upon a complex range of emotions and interconnections, supported by sparse and countrified instrumentation that sets an appropriately Texan tone.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Red
    Red may not be a bona fide country album, but it could very well be a pop masterpiece, more in line with P!nk's latest, The Truth About Love, than even Red's predecessor, Speak Now.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    His recorded albums, and even his mesmerizing live show, have gradually incorporated a country sound. That trend continues on his latest, the rewarding 14-song Rebel Soul.