Delusions of Adequacy's Scores

  • Music
For 1,314 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 69% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 Lay It Down
Lowest review score: 10 The Raven
Score distribution:
1,314 music reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's best to purely take in the dissimilarity of this exceptional new album in contrast to Hospice--it's downright astonishing on its very own.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The attention to detail Bevin is known for sounds invitingly open on Kindred and the ending fruition is a thrilling success.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Absolutely stunning... One HUGE startling success.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is music to celebrate life with and to joyously fashion because it's certainly amazing.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The National are such a powerfully gifted band, they need no theatrics to deliver an absolutely stone-cold beast of an album. With the music that is on here there is yet another thirteen songs to savor and salivate over until the next batch of songs comes about.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Yeezus is the complete affirmation of an artist willing to try new endeavors and wholeheartedly nail it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Where the Aislers Set really create a distinction between themselves and their contemporaries is through the unpredictably imaginative arrangements, bolstered by Linton's truly enigmatic melodic sense.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It won't blow you away the first time, but it eventually will.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A New Day at Midnight is not White Ladder part 2, but it does bear certain similarities, namely emotional, beautiful music matched with equally beautiful lyrics, and, of course David Gray's unmistakable voice.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Chesnutt has finally made an album that utilizes the full range offered by lush, fully adorned production to his advantage, accenting the strengths of his songwriting but never jockeying for position with his most distinctive traits.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A strong early contender for Record of the Year.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A consistently heady and visceral shot of classic Mudhoney: angry, fuzzy guitars, propulsive rhythms, and sarcastically-jaded lyrics.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A lush post-rock masterpiece.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In an era when few can truly be said to be following their own unique aesthetic, Sixteen Horsepower continue to pad their resume as one of America’s greatest reinterpretors of the American folk tradition.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A phenomenal noise record.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Everybody Loves a Happy Ending is a polychromatic, sweeping collection of gorgeous guitar-pop gems, a clever and harmonious amusement park filled with fun rides listeners will want to board over and over.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Though it is not overtly innovative in its instrumentation or approach, The Creek Drank the Cradle is composed and performed with such an inclusive, intimate voice that the album is extremely accessible, even personal.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rounds is a perfect mix of subdued chill-out music and up-tempo beats.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A work like this is only self-indulgent if its accoutrements aren't justifiable. Wilco makes every note count on this album: however miraculously, it all manages to cohere. And the songs are undeniably stunning.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While it may still fall short of the high-water mark established with Clarity, Jimmy Eat World’s latest is still a strong contender for the best album of 2004.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Honestly, there is no precedent for this album.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A follow-up album that not only meets expectations, it blows them away.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is certainly my favorite British release of the year.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Not only the best Album Leaf album to date but one of the best albums of the year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    You’re a Woman, I’m a Machine is the kind of “feelings” album that fans of noise-rock or hardcore can listen to without fear of being soft. For the rest of us, it’s an indulgence of our more dramatic emotions.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is an ambitious effort, and it could very well leave your brain hurting by the time all of the songs have wrapped themselves around you, because there is so much going on and so much to digest.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s symphonic, seductive, resolute, yearning.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Heard once, the record is breathtaking for its emotional qualities. Heard twice, it begins to sound more and more like a brilliantly crafted classical chamber piece, with themes holding each of the hymns up to the same illuminating light.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Seriously fucked-up and seriously stunning.