Denver Post's Scores

  • TV
For 233 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 The Corner: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Rob: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 171
  2. Negative: 0 out of 171
171 tv reviews
  1. It’s goofy, but fun.
  2. Cultural commentary mixed with the mystery, along with lavish production values, gives Irving’s tale a clever twist. The hour is trying to cover a lot of bases, but it may find its focus.
  3. The documentary, narrated by Benjamin Bratt (son of a Peruvian mother), is rather dry in spite of the rich subject matter. It's particularly slow-going at the start (the pre-Alamo section is a slog), but it picks up steam as the chronology moves toward the modern age with notables contributing first-person accounts.
  4. The tone ranges from fun to scholarly as colorful drawings enliven the film.
  5. A funny but not particularly inventive political comedy about four Republican Senators sharing a house in Washington, D.C.
  6. Like most docu- reality TV mashups, the need for drama on-screen trumped detailed explanations. Choppy editing comes standard. Still, the tension between the impulse to search and the need for privacy is clear. Emotions run high and the conflict makes for good television.
  7. While the first hour is daunting, the series offers a terrific villainess who also has a knack for humor. [28 Aug 2005, p.F-03]
    • Denver Post
  8. Grand special effects, impressive acting by the young Sequoyah and an enduring interest in all things supernatural may help Believe to catch on.
  9. A worthy new configuration - the side-splittingly sad sitcom. [2 June 2005, p.F-01]
    • Denver Post
  10. The debut is cinematically beautiful, the cast is top-notch, the story is compelling, the characters distinct, the music stirring. The question is, why now? [30 Dec 1997]
    • Denver Post
  11. Think of it as a def Dallas, an African-American Dynasty for 2003, a blend of MTV and BET that finds itself on UPN. ... Sex, violence, music and some eye-catching casting make this effort worth a look. [13 Apr 2003]
    • Denver Post
  12. The cinematography is stunning, the music and atmospherics are immersive. With occasional hiccups the acting is mostly subtle. Suspension of disbelief will be required (how else can Bassam/Barry slip out of his father's palace in the middle of the night to rendez-vous with an old journalist buddy?) But Tyrant is worth the effort.
  13. Matthew Lillard, Emily Rios, Thomas M. Wright, Ted Levine and Annabeth Gish are well cast and their characters are fully sketched. Having seen two hours of season 2, I’m not ready to give up yet, but I’m starting to prioritize TV’s darkest hours and wonder if The Bridge will make the cut.
  14. G&O feels less serious of intent, less urban or urbane than “Broad City.” But fun.
  15. After a very slow start, Outlander, from the book series by Diana Gabaldon, is a bodice-ripper with a sprinkling of science fiction, a fantasy drama with a bit of action-adventure.
  16. It's all a fairly standard spy-thriller template, but the cast and crew give Legends an edge. Trust Howard Gordon ("Homeland," "24") and company to devise a well-plotted mystery.
  17. It's tough work that may help the viewer appreciate the miracle that occurs any time an indie movie actually makes sense, let alone transports audiences.
  18. The series sometimes meanders, but only because Grohl's goals are lofty.
  19. The film glosses over the turbulent aspects of Brown's personal life (domestic-abuse charges and an arrest record are mentioned in passing), and it isn't comprehensive (there's nothing about his four wives, six children, drug addiction or his death in 2006). But the tuneful feature-length film is packed with great vintage clips.
  20. While the characters are slight and the dialog is silly, there's a story there somewhere.
  21. The extremes of smart and wacky writing styles have never been so much at odds.
  22. Think the Clintons meet "Dallas" in D.C. And that, for six episodes, may be enough.
  23. Conflicts and tortured characters abound. Unfortunately, the drama goes somewhat soggy when the camera leaves the tight confines of the submarine and the complex plotlines twist into knots.
  24. It would be naughty to call it dry. But the lack of personalities leaves the viewer groping for an angle. The overwhelming nature of the event begins to feel overwhelming on the couch, too.
  25. Much of the insanity that drove viewers to “hate-watch” the show in its first season has been scrubbed. Competence reigns. The results are mixed.
  26. It is formulaic but built to last. Think of this expensive remake as 'Touched by a Kimble.'... The workmanlike hour continues to mine old themes of alienation, injustice and the search for truth. [5 Oct 2000, p.E-03]
    • Denver Post
  27. As the lead character, actor Kevin James has a certain something. We just hope it's not contagious. [21 Sept 1998, p.G-05]
    • Denver Post
  28. Fans will enjoy picking out the many sight gags and puns in the dense, multilayered animation. But, on first viewing, and unlike "The Simpsons," the "Futurama" pilot isn't fall-off-the-couch funny. [25 Mar 1999]
    • Denver Post
  29. Funny - barely - in an uncomfortable, theatrical way, some moments feel like performance art or improv exercises, albeit with nice title sequences. [14 Aug 2005]
    • Denver Post
  30. The talented cast and upbeat pilot work in the series’ favor, but if the half-hour is to be more than a platform for Williams’ improv, the story will have to go deeper. And make us care.

Top Trailers