Dot Music's Scores

  • Music
For 1,511 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Electric Circus
Lowest review score: 10 Rolling Papers
Score distribution:
1,511 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A work so consistently stirring, stately, and pop-aware it makes most recent guitar-based art-rock albums look tawdry.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album misses the addictive funk of 'Red Alert', the off beat quirks of 'Yo Yo' and the engulfing production depth of 'Same Old Show'. But it's a powerful package and a proof that the Basement Jaxx have the confidence and vision to pursue their own path.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's rather a genuinely exuberant, joyously infectious and sheerly celebratory affair, its tribal drums, parping keyboards and rippling, brassy guitars offset by sweet vocal harmonies and reverb-laden solos, with Koenig's witty and literate lyrics marking out their crucial difference.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    'One Day Like This' rolls out an exultant, almost fulsome, bright blue-sky assurance that really, no matter how gloomy you might feel, a lovely day can put an altogether better complexion on things. If anyone else voiced such sentiments, you'd rightly want to reach into the stereo and slap them hard, but that Elbow make the affirmation ring touchingly true is a testament to their sweet sincerity and principled candour.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Beyond the grooves etched in this record, what is most exciting is the ease with which Arbez brushes aside the canon of 90s giants.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Many of the tracks (including "Positive Tension" and "This Modern Love") are so choppy and discontinuous as to give you the same nauseous feeling you get when you hear a Mars Volta record.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is not an album to listen to casually. It insists on taking over your life for an hour, demands a level of concentration rare in rock, amply repays multiple plays.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Luke Haines, of nineties nobodies The Auteurs and Baader Meinhof, together with Sarah Nixey and John Moore, appear to have taken Saint Etienne's 'Like a Motorway' (from 'Tiger Bay') and driven away with it in a battered Ford Escort to a distant destination, a concept album about motorways and travelling.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even at his laziest, Wolf sounds vastly more intelligent, committed and interesting than his supposed rivals, and "The Magic Position" is full of heart, warmth and beauty.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rambunctious and packed with a lust for life, "We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Seesions" is not only Springsteen's rowdiest set in years, it's the one that seems likely to win him a whole new audience.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For some, this and the album's unabashed opulence may prove too much to stomach. For others though, Lindstrom has created a sophisticated and lovingly crafted album that despite its dance driven pulse will resonate with music lovers of all persuasions.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You'll struggle to find any filler on a record that works magnificently as a whole.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All in, this is a terrific, life-affirming and, at times, deeply romantic album - one that proves the potentials in both rock'n'roll and the electric guitar.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It seems only logical that the three of them have relied so heavily on synths to create It's Blitz--despite Zinner's natural gift for manipulating the guitar--an album that's effectively a love letter to the dancefloor.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    "Jarvis" is a collection of 13 individual songs, rather than an album with cohesive impact.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's certainly very cleverly composed and constructed but ultimately sounds aloof and impenetrable and, as a result, somewhat devoid of emotion.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While it'd be ridiculously premature to cast The Horrors as the future of anything, this is a bold and often brilliant step in that direction.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If leaving Lost Highway was a blow to Regan's confidence you'd never know it from hearing this - he's definitely taken the right turning.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    'Under Construction' isn't a retro album, so much as it's informed by both new and old. But it also isn't beyond question whether this return to roots doesn't conceal a lack of inspiration.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A more satisfying album intellectually than it is musically.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The dark malevolent genius of "Windowlicker" may be lacking, but Richard D. James still walks that line between the accessible and the downright filthy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A cohesive and satisfying listen crammed with generous melodies.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Karin Dreijer Andersson would probably make for a fascinating interview but her reluctance to talk about her music is a blessing. There's simply no way she'll ever live up to these sounds.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's ironic and ill-fitting that such ditch-hopping actually embroils them in impassioned debate--and it's a credit to them that, love or hate these songs' lack of drama, you'll remember them very, very well.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    We've been waiting over two years for a follow-up, and in that context, "Get Behind Me Satan" is disappointing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Proof once more, that you can be experimental, extreme and eccentric but be excellently hip hop all at the same time.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Justice essentially have two modes: funky techno built with filthy overdriven synth sounds and gleefully daft disco/'80s pastiche so shiny as to be almost reflective. Both are held together with a studio rigour that makes the record bounce out of the speakers so forcefully that the moments of synthesis, where the sound coheres into its trademark elastic groove, become utterly addictive.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, it's less chaotic and noisily rampant, the Comets' awesome creative fury now channelled into structures more obviously resembling tunes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Fall are the most predictable and unpredictable band in Britain.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where the album triumphs though is the crystalline clarity of the songs, their titanic emotional wallop and Marling's quite exquisite delivery.