Dot Music's Scores

  • Music
For 1,511 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Drukqs
Lowest review score: 10 Rolling Papers
Score distribution:
1511 music reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At 14 tracks long, The Dodos do push the point a little, but it's really a case of once you've lit the touch-paper you live with the explosions till the last spark.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Hearing him coast is still better than listening to most rappers trying; but the Jay-Z of today sounds like someone for whom making music is an enjoyable hobby, not a burning need.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The results breathe that same rarefied air as Nick Drake or Vashti Bunyan.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Andorra feels free and fresh, comfortable exploring its own sonic identity.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nine Types Of Light is an album that manages to blend experimentation with a welcoming accessibility that proves pop music can still be bold this far down the line.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Such is the depth and quality of Turner's songwriting, it plays like a best of.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She's melded the two sides of her history much more seamlessly; four-to-the-floor pop belters mix with touches of electronic and lyrical darkness to make one of the pop albums of the year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Establishes him not only as a master of the fast and fluid flow, but an insightful, frequently humorous - if somewhat socio- politically naïve - lyricist.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    'Poses', his second terrific album, is a collection of 12 songs in search of a musical; arch tales that mingle snapshots of boho life with arch allusions to courtly love.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is not a 'commercial' release, at least not in the commonly construed meaning of the word. If you had to be picky, you could say that nothing has the impact of that cover of Nine Inch Nail's "Hurt" or Nick Lowe's "The Beast In Me". But that's beside the point.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At 31 minutes, the record is a short and bitter mind-melter.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is not the work of a band prepared to make a song and dance to keep everyone interested, but one happy to build something good from not a lot and hope you like it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Most people will deem this album a significant piece of work, and maybe if you haven't heard much Pavement then it is.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Utterly unique and frequently wonderful.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Re-emerging after a mere eight month gestation with their second album (they're referring to it as an extended EP just to be difficult, but whatever), the only natural assumption would be that the whirlwind of inconsistency smashes on unabated. And in some respects it does, but key to this record's fortunes is a sense that first they're running out of ideas and second have chilled their bones to become less rigidly obsessed with quantity and cleverness and proving their self-worth.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At every turn this record astonishes with its accomplishment.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Aside from the incredible sonics though, Phoenix's real triumph here is successfully contorting the songs into ever more elaborate and unconventional arrangements without losing any of their classy pop impact.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nine fantastically-detailed, delicately-constructed and warm-sounding pieces that are far too slippery to fall into neat genre parameters.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Inevitably, it all starts to grow a little samey.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They muster compelling music that sounds like triumph in the face of adversity, building something beautiful out of the building blocks of sadness and despair.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This Is It... is an incredible leap forward as a result. She was already good. Now she's awesome.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A work so consistently stirring, stately, and pop-aware it makes most recent guitar-based art-rock albums look tawdry.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album misses the addictive funk of 'Red Alert', the off beat quirks of 'Yo Yo' and the engulfing production depth of 'Same Old Show'. But it's a powerful package and a proof that the Basement Jaxx have the confidence and vision to pursue their own path.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's rather a genuinely exuberant, joyously infectious and sheerly celebratory affair, its tribal drums, parping keyboards and rippling, brassy guitars offset by sweet vocal harmonies and reverb-laden solos, with Koenig's witty and literate lyrics marking out their crucial difference.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    'One Day Like This' rolls out an exultant, almost fulsome, bright blue-sky assurance that really, no matter how gloomy you might feel, a lovely day can put an altogether better complexion on things. If anyone else voiced such sentiments, you'd rightly want to reach into the stereo and slap them hard, but that Elbow make the affirmation ring touchingly true is a testament to their sweet sincerity and principled candour.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Beyond the grooves etched in this record, what is most exciting is the ease with which Arbez brushes aside the canon of 90s giants.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is not an album to listen to casually. It insists on taking over your life for an hour, demands a level of concentration rare in rock, amply repays multiple plays.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Luke Haines, of nineties nobodies The Auteurs and Baader Meinhof, together with Sarah Nixey and John Moore, appear to have taken Saint Etienne's 'Like a Motorway' (from 'Tiger Bay') and driven away with it in a battered Ford Escort to a distant destination, a concept album about motorways and travelling.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even at his laziest, Wolf sounds vastly more intelligent, committed and interesting than his supposed rivals, and "The Magic Position" is full of heart, warmth and beauty.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rambunctious and packed with a lust for life, "We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Seesions" is not only Springsteen's rowdiest set in years, it's the one that seems likely to win him a whole new audience.