Drawer B's Scores

  • Music
For 121 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Kill The Moonlight
Lowest review score: 10 Don't Believe The Truth
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 73 out of 121
  2. Negative: 21 out of 121
121 music reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even though this compilation doesn’t rival any of the Pixies’ classic studio albums, it is still essential listening.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By turns goofy, intellectual, and non-sequitur lyrics are indecipherable without the lyric sheet, but the strangely alluring charm of songs like "The Skin of My Country Yellow Teeth" will have you clamoring for more.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An ambitious, sprawling string of songs.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Hives’ propulsive, polyrhythmic outbursts are so packed with hooks and catchy choruses that you can’t help but overlook the schtick and give in to the raucous delight.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Give Up is pure, unadulterated dance pop from start to finish.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She’s clever and sharp with her lyrical daggers, and she’s frighteningly aware of the impact of her own voice.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The biggest problem with Hail to The Thief is its lack of surprise.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The smarmy lyrics are back in full force, but the music is so crisp, clean, and catchy that it hardly matters at all.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Don't be fooled by the constant references to other bands. While the foundation upon which Interpol is building, certainly is borrowed, its music is not a miming act.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Takk is sharper and more direct than anything the band has previously churned out, but that is not to say it’s by any means accessible by normal standards.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album packed with as many irresistible hooks as Whenever You’re Ready deserves to be heard.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Albarn’s ability to slither arrogantly from genre to genre while maintaining his charm is truly remarkable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Silkworm as classic rock? Yep, and it’s damn good, too.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album is an extraordinary display of Oberst’s songwriting prowess. It’s obscenely ambitious and pretentious and ridiculous but unquestionably memorable and affecting.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    We Love Life trades Pulp's characteristic risk-taking for smooth accessibility, which works a gray, rainy day magic over the proceedings.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Take away the insane lyrics, and you’ve still got music worth listening to. Granted, it sounds like Journey being raped by Ronnie James Dio, but you have to admit that’s intriguing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Antics is a grower. It’s not as grandiose as its predecessor, but it still packs a lasting punch.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not exactly radio friendly, The Woods explores sonic deconstruction a la Led Zeppelin and Jimi Hendrix instead of the preciously catchy indie pop hooks you’ve come to expect.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Torino is most definitely not a Wedding Present album by any stretch of the imagination, it should win back some of the die-hard older fans that may have boycotted Cinerama at the onset.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It isn’t until you’ve given it your full attention that the album starts to reveal its true depth and worth with songs that stick and get under your skin and make you come back for more.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Think Tank is Blur’s most cerebral, wildly experimental album, ever.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It all unfurls more like a musical than an indie rock record, but don’t let the dissonance scare you away.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite the daunting Radiohead-colored cloud that hangs heavy over Muse, the band pushes the limits of its slick, pre-apocalyptic rock with a self-assured strut.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    These songs will undoubtedly knock the wind out of you, but for every dynamic explosion or screeching wall of noise there’s a hook in tow.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    604
    So yes, it has that retro-futuristic edge, but what sets 604 apart is the distinct lack of kitsch.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For a guy that has so little to say with so few ways to say it, Trent Reznor has mastered the art of making what is old sound new again.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Luckily, the band doesn’t cave into the dance-punk trend without expanding upon its current ubiquity with skillful songwriting and risky avoidance of testosterone.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Maladroit is a welcome - halfway - return to form.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    High Society expands upon the hurried schizophrenia of Schmersal’s previous band, Brainiac, elevating songwriting to the same level of experimental deconstruction to both the detriment and advancement of the band’s core sound.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    i
    The only disappointment is the fact that everything sounds a tad too familiar.