Drowned In Sound's Scores

  • Music
For 3,217 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Loveless [Reissue]
Lowest review score: 0 BE
Score distribution:
3,217 music reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Succinctly, it's a crap record.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    'Rock N Roll' is the worst record Ryan Adams has ever put his name to; a mess of identikit garage buffoonery and amateurish production, filled with rushed lyrics and written-in-a-weekend tunes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Sure this album may well sound awesome if you’ve just snorted a metre of charlie or recently breakfasted from a menu of ‘shrooms and LSD, but for sober ears it’s enough to drive anyone to drugs.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Bland and instantly forgettable.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Stereophonics have in effect 'done a U2', packing in the arena-filling songs but with added AOR. Elements of rock dinosaurs such as ELO, Chicago and Fleetwood Mac all crop up over the course of 11 songs.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    A big stinking pile of rubbish.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    There’s not one song on here worth releasing as a single. Only two or three are even remotely listenable.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It seems they’ve not only gone and made that sensible and mature fifth album that every band past their sell-by date inflicts on their effervescently loyal fans, they’ve actually made a record that would be more appropriate in an old folks’ home than your local indie niterie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    With the genre oversaturated beyond belief, bands need to produce something special and original to stand out from the crowd. Radio 4 fail to do that.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The Rapture have kept all the ingredients from their previous successes, but they have forgot to ignite the oven.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Perhaps the worst aspect of ONe is how on autopilot the band sounds. Even the flat-out rockers – like the opener, 'Teahouse Of The Spirits' – contain no guitar pyrotechnics and come off sounding limp and perfunctory.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Not only are these not the greatest songs in the world, they're not even a tribute to them.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Devoid of inspiration, lacking in any edge, this is pathetic.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The sad thing is that while nobody expects Kaiser Chiefs to be re-inventing the wheel, we do expect a pretty rock-solid, perfect pop record. Yours Truly, Angry Mob most definitely isn't rock solid or perfect in any sense.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    He is annoying, simple as; his repeated ego-stroking irritates like a mosquito bite on an already sunburned forearm – it only adds to the pain.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    There’s just very so little of merit here--glazed pop-rock staggers into itself as the whole album washes past without you realising.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    But most of all, these songs really blow, man. Way to top-load it with three half-decent tracks at the start.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Lyrically, things grate from the off, with cringe-worthy and rudimentary rhyming couplets being Peñate’s irritating stock in trade. By the end, everything has blended into a graceless, jaunty melange of up-down guitar strokes, bellowed vocals and mid-tempo skanks.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    These Are The Good Times People is a mere shadow of its ‘90s counterpart that struggles to retain any of the President’s early charm.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    There’re dudes out there (Google them) who will try and tell you this album has some relevance, that it represents pop, that it’s important. That it’s good. They’re wrong.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Formula is strictly adhered to, and while pace may differ from one jolly strum-about to the next, the void where there should be a worthwhile tune remains.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The result is like a musical cab ride from hell, a forty-minute endurance test of half-baked cockney cod-philosophy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It’s a horribly calculated, horrible slice of anthemic horribleness. Throughout, dreadful lyrics are in abundance, pianos are thumped and drums are bashed.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Even a past-it Smashing Pumpkins ‘reunion’ with only Corgan remaining is more acceptable than this awful mimickery and that’s not a good place for a band to be.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    An attempt to relive the RATM era that falls far, far short of the bar. Save your money and go and listen to the real deal instead.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It’s a fatal flaw that rears itself again and again as a bastardised version of blue-collar Americana is force-fed a mass-produced strain of bland modern rock throughout all eleven tracks.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It's at the safest of removes; emote by rote, numbness by numbers.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    There are moments which hint at Casablancas’ underlying skill as a writer on Phrazes, but there’s such a ruinous deployment of disparate ideas that they never form a cogent whole.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    In general, the choruses are forgettable, the guitars are woefully exaggerated, and the quirkiness that made Weezer a band to be cherished now seems forced and stale.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    This aggressive tone is a constant throughout and pretty much breaks new boundaries in sounding absolutely ridiculous.