Dusted Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,408 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Neon Golden
Lowest review score: 0 Rain In England
Score distribution:
2408 music reviews
    • 99 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    We have a groundbreaking album re-released, with some strong live material
    • 99 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Packaging quibbles aside, this is a great set.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With this encyclopedic set, Smith delivers yet another convincing musical document for his consideration as one of the most accomplished composers/bandleaders currently working in creative improvised music.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Against all expectations, Brian Wilson has achieved what should have been impossible, and has produced what may be the year's most thrilling album.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rhino’s new Big Star box set Keep an Eye on the Sky seems like it was put together as much to please Big Star fans as it was to introduce newcomers to the band.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album sounds vast and intimate at the same time, like keenly recorded sketches.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Some of the best songs that the Louvin Brothers ever wrote.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The early material is interesting, if only to hear how "Web in Front" and "Wrong" were fleshed out on Icky Mettle. But it's the album, and The Greatest of All Time, that are the real draw here.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Some of the finest, yet frustratingly overlooked folk rock of the era.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    While every Ivy League dog kennel worker with a paycheck from Blender or Revolver may write dissertations about how Outkast re-invented pop music (and if we follow that logic) then Madvillain simply destroys the boundaries.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Box
    It’s a majestic, often breathtaking collection of some of the most important electronic music of its time, where Voigt managed the seemingly impossible task of bringing the forest to the disco, or vice versa.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of the most important anthologies to come along in quite a while.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you like dub techno - and who among us with a taste for dissociated, repetitive, awesomely deep and gritty music wouldn't? - you're bound to like a lot of this stuff, and love some of it.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you can get past the non-audiophile recording, there’s some great music here.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Jones and Taylor were only recent regulars in Monk’s orbit, but both align well with his designs and the drummer’s hard-driving sticks goose the music repeatedly. The leader plays with his usual marriage of advanced angularity and idiosyncratic energy, balancing the occasional ensemble uncertainties with a string of strong solo detours to which the band gladly defers. ... Nearly any Monk is Monk of note, but “new” Monk of this nature deserves the encomia it’s sure to engender.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a fantastic body of work, as vital and fresh-sounding now as it was when first released.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lamar has once more asserted a great and formidable talent, and good kid is triumphantly and unmistakably his, but the artists that stick around longest are the ones who let us make their art our own.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    From Here We Go Sublime is fantastic all around, and it’s all the more effective for its restraint.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Someday the Smithsonian will file this sprawling musical celebration into their collection between Van Dyke Parks’ Discover America and Norman Rockwell’s Saturday Evening Post covers -- joyous, generous Americana filtered through a singular sensibility.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sleater-Kinney is back in all its spiky, brainy, let-a-bunch-of-ideas-fight-it-out glory.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Looks Like Rain, 'Frisco Mabel Joy and Heaven Help the Child--represent an outre high-water mark of sorts in the country singer-songwriter era.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A collection of past moments, which add up to a splendid memorial to a monumental moment in New York’s musical history.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Marred by indie-rock clichés and occasional over-effort, it remains frustrating.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Considering the host of absolutely killer tracks, London Zoo might just be Kevin Martin's finest album, which is astounding considering the man has been making music for two decades.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Instead of burning before an audience, here you have them working with other musicians and outboard effects to accomplish a vertical array of sounds that reward deep listening as much as full-body engagement.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Big Boi isn't an MC; he's a songwriter. That distinction is what separates him from other rappers, and it's what makes Sir Lucious--an album whose elan is instantaneously felt and whose spirit only becomes more invigorated with each listening--such a pleasure.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    That emptiness tempts a listener in, and puts you in its place--you, in a sense, step into the record’s point of view. This invitation to intimacy is a powerful move that most club music is simply incapable of.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Now, rather than trying to replay his roots and influences, he’s incorporating them as threads in the in the tapestry of his own rich, distinctly beautiful sound.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    With Neon Golden, the Notwist have created a daring album full of different sounds and textures. While this might sound like a textbook post-rock album, it is without a doubt a record firmly anchored by its pop sensibilities.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One thing that’s allowed Napalm Death to keep punching through mirrors is that as its sound has sharpened, the band’s ability to capture high-resolution chaos has sharpened, too.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s dark and brooding, fiercely sparse at times and blindingly dense at others. Footwork is no longer an appropriate descriptor for this music. With Black Origami, Jlin has transcended her roots to build a language all of her own. And simply put, it’s brilliant.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fed
    Ingenuity and sincerity (two things in which Hayes excels) are priceless, and the sum of the parts is quite a masterpiece indeed.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Last Exit is a truly excellent album, one of the best of 2004 so far. But what is truly exciting is the promise Last Exit holds for the future – for that of the Junior Boys themselves and the countless others it is sure to inspire.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's not a return to form so much as a complete reinvention, this is an album that highlights a particularly buoyant Animal Collective, one that’s managed to expand their sound in surprising ways while still retaining the same basic creative impulses that made them such a joy to watch develop over the past decade
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A balls-out, hateful, heavy, and catchy piece of work that rocks like it was 1994 all over again.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Five years on, We Are Monster finds Raijko Muller so confident and articulate that Rest comes off in comparison like a set of hastily scrawled clutch notes.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    To put it simply, Ali and Toumani is a quiet, intimate, timeless record; a transcendent expression of cultural pride, deep friendship, and above all, breath-taking musical colloquy.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Get beyond the Phil Collins-into-Peter Gabriel style clarity, and the songs start to take hold.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There’s a Dream I’ve Been Saving is an engrossing 107 song compilation of weird artistry that panders to all the trends of its era, that being 1966-1971.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    So when I say that Yours, Mine & Ours sounds too good to be true, I'm resolved after much deliberation that this is an entirely positive thing: it is impeccably conceived, executed, and produced.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    On Chutes, Mercer’s voice is singing right next to you, and the change works wonders.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Three full studio albums into their reinvigorated latest phase, and Swans’ ability to surprise remains as potent as ever To Be Kind might just be the most startling and uncompromising of the trio, although these qualities take time to unveil themselves.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Essentially, the Brians don't really need to innovate that much anymore and instead are just fine-tuning their craft in glorious ways.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Working almost like a glorified mixtape, many of the tracks bleed together or start mid-scene with field recordings of corner action. It adds to the feeling that you’ve dropped in on something important.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Newsom is, obviously, not the first musician to get technically better at what she does while we’re looking on, and not the first, either, to elicit a twinge of regret from listeners who liked the rawer, wilder beginnings.... Divers hides its sting not in an unusual voice, but in its lyrical and musical complexity, and it’s a good trade after all.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While it is undeniably a good record, reaching into the stratosphere of excellence at points, Ejstes' overall modus operandi seems more akin to outright homage at times than any sort of exploration of the means and methods of vintage '70s rock and its application in a modern context.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He may not voice things like Ellington would have, but it doesn't matter. It could never stop, as far as I'm concerned.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's a wider range of styles and sounds here, from dramatic shoegazer epics to the closest they've ever gotten to straight-ahead rock. Not everything gels solidly, and there are some awkward moments, but no real stumbles.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Easy on the ears, Film Music’s approachable offerings are compounded by the high recording quality, new transfers made from original half-inch tapes in the Tariverdiev family’s Moscow apartment.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The musical backing is radiantly raw, splintering guitars, hard thwacked drums, riffs that saw up from the bottom, break the surface and resubmerge. Barnett’s band — Dan Luscombe on guitar, Bones Sloane on bass and Dave Mudie on drum--is quite good, in a raucous, Replacements-into-Thermals way.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result of this multi-layered synergy, and what helps separate it from its soulless similars, is a record that is all at once satisfyingly complex, but also invitingly warm.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's tempting to spend hours excavating metaphors and translating references on a record this complex and interesting, but Destroyer's Rubies also works well as pop.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The most cohesive LP in at least five years and its darkest, most urgent, most intense work to date.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Granted, there will be some that cling to the lo-fi eccentricities of that debut, but while Oh Me Oh My... may have won him heaps of critical praise, Rejoicing in the Hands is the album that backs it all up.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On the whole Basement is noisy and rough, and often sounds more like the best record Heatmiser never made than the next Elliott Smith album.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    I can sense that there's something pretty great going on and even briefly catch glimpses of it. But as an experience, it's a little bit maddening, and eventually I'll want to throw away the glasses and pick up a book.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A musical tour-de-force, and probably Sleater-Kinney’s best album to date.... If it lacks the immediate appeal and accessibility of One Beat or All Hands on the Bad One, it feels more mature and meaningful than either.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s that rare record that’s equal parts innovation and familiarity, or what one might refer to as a perfectly designed and executed experiment in indie aesthetics.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Monoliths and Dimensions is a bold step forward and bodes well for Sunn 0)))’s future relevance as not just musicians, but honest-to-god composers.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From listening to both of the intended follow-ups to his first album, though, you wouldn't know any better, as both records capitalize on the musical maturity of Harlan County in different but equally satisfying directions.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Their pithy discography--a kind of ur-record of indie-pop, ripped off knowingly and unknowingly--is part of their magic.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Bad Seeds have not made a record this ambitious, well, ever, and the results are rewarding, thoughtful and challenging.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You get the impression that the artist is truly a giving soul, even if his gift is in the form of an emotionally wrenching, uncomfortably confessional record.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    I'd be surprised if anybody, in any field, drops something this potent in the next nine months.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What's more remarkable than her fascinating biography is her bold music. Like her life story, there's hardly anything like it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s heavy in concept but sprightly and reverential in its execution, its hallucinatory breadth reminiscent of the outre jazz of Sun Ra and the wily funk of Parliament, of mid-’70s Miles Davis and Herbie Hancock.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Vernon’s voice is the showpiece here––a fragile, technically imperfect falsetto, he multi-tracks it into a shimmering, heat-giving force on each of the record’s nine songs.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The music can sometimes obscure the words, with only snippets allowing themes of love, loss and solitude to creep into the listener’s consciousness.... Have You in My Wilderness is another arresting album by an equally arresting artist, one who is clearly at the forefront of the global avant-pop scene and will be for some time.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At times, it sounds as though the band was still working through exactly how they wanted all of the various elements to work together, such that there are some immediate, hook-filled songs ("White Winter Hymnal," "Your Protector," "He Doesn't Know Why") and other songs whose more complex structures require more from the listener.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Last year, the Moritz Von Oswald Trio sounded like they were headed for space. This year, I'd say the mothership has come back home.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s an overarching concept. It doesn’t matter one way or another. It’s a gallop from start to finish. Blue Record is going to be hard to top.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In a year that will feature not just a new long-player from Lennox's Animal Collective but also a box set's worth of rare material, it may be hard to surpass the haunting, blissful pageantry of Person Pitch.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shackleton, if there was any doubt, can do big picture and tight focus equally well; he can lead us into the future musically while digging in his heels against the one that's actually in store.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [This] is the first time Bowie’s been interesting since 2002’s overlooked Heathen, and if you prefer his avant-garde side, this is the first sustained material of its kind in far longer; both of these are certainly things to celebrate.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    m b v is an impressive work, one in which adventurous and nostalgic listeners alike will find something to appreciate.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whatever ensemble he employs, and in whatever style he plays, unpredictability is a major component of his M.O. Silent Movies is no exception, and his formidable technique services music that continually thwarts expectation.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A New Way... didn't need reinforcements, and taking in all 14 tracks in succession can be tough going, but a little bit of overkill doesn't dull the bracing energy of Orcutt's kinetic, four-string idioglossia.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Showtime’s length dilutes the bursts of exotic spice and flavor laced throughout.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    He sacrifices none of his newfound momentum on the fantastic Dig, Lazarus, Dig!!!, his sharpest, wittiest, most resolute album in over a decade.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As with many works that get tagged as major breaks from an artist’s established work, truthfully much of Too Bright still feels very much like the work of the Perfume Genius, and anyone looking for more of what they got from past albums will be very satisfied.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If he's not making his most important works of his career, it may well be his best.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite a 100% turnover in accompanists and recording locations from his William Tyler-produced debut, he doesn’t sound terribly different here. His big, distinctive voice can hold you via sheer volume and timbre even if you don’t listen to a word he says, and his robustly picked electric guitar is a band by itself.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even the wordless tracks on Arca are among the producer’s most powerful vignettes.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A pleasantly lush album that may be his finest work yet.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Stars of the Lid and Their Refinement of the Decline is a return to the same blissful twilight as before, virtually unpaused.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    However great the merits of their debut might be, one can’t help but feel that there’s something just a little too perfect about Franz Ferdinand, as though they had planned out hipster world-domination around a scientifically constructed chart of "what’s hot and what’s not."
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    xx
    It's a gorgeous and dreamy feeling, and one that's easy to spend a lot of time in.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At just 37 minutes, World Music is wisely edited--most of the songs hover around the 3-minute mark, so they speak their piece and move on before you get tempted to start peeling apart the layers to see what they're really made of.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Neon Bible is so successful because it showcases big ambition without ignoring the small things.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Almost classically psychedelic at times, with the overdriven saturation of too much light, motion and volume applied to every aspect of the music, this ensemble... represents the best of gritty, pre-funk groove music, Day-Glo popcorn cooking in gasoline, rattling like a machine gun.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Suburbs is a really good record, but it's clear that indie rock is not in Kansas anymore.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Its 42 minutes are comparatively modest, sure, but there’s no question that the man behind the boards here has his finger on the pulse of what may be missing most in electronic music right now--a central reference point. In Colour is that star, the record to hold everyone else’s narratives together.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    [A] seemingly out-of-nowhere collection of quiet masterpieces.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A little older and a little more experienced, the sound of Claro here is slower in BPM but more graceful as a result.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s an arresting record that doesn’t pull strings or elide with gimmicks, nor does it preach or try to persuade. You needn’t believe in a higher order to realize that Seven Swans is an expression of something stirring, something beautiful.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Inconclusive. Kala plays as mixed media pastiche, a barely restrained amalgam of ideas that are hardly exhausted by beats or flow and double and triple as political references.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bootleggers will tell you that there are better versions of almost anything Neil Young puts out, and maybe they’re right, but that doesn’t matter much when this record’s playing. Because nude, even if you see some flaws, you’re not going to care because they’re dressed just right for love. You might love them even more for imperfections like the disarmingly stoned giggle at the start of “Hawaii.”
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If she wanted to move or enlighten, Let England Shake falls short.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Make no mistake – the beats are still rigid, dabbling in taut funk and squelching electro as much as snotty punk moves and glorious polyrhtyhms. These nine songs, however, ring with a clarity of purpose and a true intent that was previously altogether lacking, presenting a far more cohesive image of Murphy and his many strengths.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This record is a wonderful accomplishment – instead of relying on tricks and methods explored on earlier records, Herren expands via reflection, tracing sounds back to their roots in hopes of finding a new path.