Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,559 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2,559 game reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's disappointing that basic irritants are still evident in the singleplayer game. But it's the online version - which takes the hunter/hunted metaphor to chilling extremes - which ends up being one of the most nerve-racking gaming experiences of all time. [Apr 2004, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    One of the few games of its type you can actually play for an hour, take on one of its missions, and have a meaningful unit of experience. Staight in. Straight out. Gamer satisfied. [Sept 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When two Sims lovingly clasp each other as they sleep, even the coldest gaming hearts will begin to melt. [Oct 2004, p.102]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Those accustomed to the adult world of online PC gaming may have reason to sniff at the more streamlined play, but Pandemic has given consoles a whole new genre, pretty much perfectly formed... No game has ever felt quite so much like playing with Star Wars figures. [Nov 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The control system deserves special mention, as it could so easily have been crude or overwhelming. Instead, it's sophisticated and sensitive, catering solidly enough for corridor-cleaning run'n'guns while allowing ambitious flights of TK fancy. [Aug 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is, of course, more of the same, but the concept is as compulsive as ever. [Jan 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If there is a criticism, it's the essentially unvarying mission objectives. In the hands of a lesser developer, it might have resulted in a monotony over the game's long life span. That it never does is a testament to Drag-on Dragoon's excellence. [Dec 2003, p.98; JPN Import]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game’s major achievement is an emphasis less on personal advancement, but rather on working as a cohesive unit to achieve your collective goal – the hunting of monsters, truly absurdly monstrous monsters... It’s an excellent exercise in humility and cooperation, and one that should not be passed by. [Dec 2005, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Much of the attraction is largely due to the variety of racing on offer, but it's the overall quality of that racing that is responsible for ensuring Race Driver 2 remains an intensely engaging ride. [May 2004, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A large number of possibilities awaits the ambitious tactician. From tunnelling assaults to flying barrage defences, Perimeter relies on the imagination of players to become genuinely interesting. [Aug 2004, p.105]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What will stop you in your tracks is the scale, detail and beuty of the environments. Even after repeated play it's impossible not to pause and breathe in the magnificant view from the top of the Deep Amazon Temple. [May 2004, p.94]
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From the near-pornographic money-shot that occurs during the slo-mo moments of certain vicious attack combos, to the ludicrous events that send the player travelling down a monster's throat, God of War is made from the stuff of legend, to become the stuff of legend.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For console owners used to having to fiddle with power sliders in order to orchestrate their shots, it brings a nigh-on edible element of tangibility to the experience... An accomplished bundle. [May 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gameplay purists may scowl, but Read Dead Revolver is a triumph for beautifully observed atmospherics, characterisation and slapstick set-pieces you cannot fail to enjoy. [June 2004, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its troop AI is better than that of "FEAR," and environmentally more aware than that of "Far Cry." [May 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When so many games are trying to defend their value by cramming every mode and style into one unpalatable mix, it's refreshing to play something that's conceived with such vibrant, capricious clarity. [May 2004, p.104]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From its overpowered weapons and gormless AI to its pedestrian objecctives, the singleplayer game is as dumb as it is misguided – an embarrassment to the rather splendid mulitplayer game that, fortunately, represents all that's really important. [Dec 2005, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's taken two near-miss games to get here, but Insomniac has finally nailed the art of war, lock, stock and around 20 smoking barrels. [Christmas 2004, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Levels feel more segmented and less regimented, and the better for it. There’s no cheap, wholesale reduction of difficulty, just what feels like a more balanced play experience. [Jan 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    FFXI may not technically be the future of MMORPGs, as there’s no ignoring its derivative nature. However, it has cleverly assimilated all the elements that make the genre so popular and married them with international brand popularity well beyond the reach of other, more ghettoised MMORPGs. [Dec 2005, p110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    FFXI may not technically be the future of MMORPGs, as there’s no ignoring its derivative nature. However, it has cleverly assimilated all the elements that make the genre so popular and married them with international brand popularity well beyond the reach of other, more ghettoised MMORPGs. [Dec 2005, p110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whatever you conclude about the bigger picture, this is special stuff. The claustrophobic buzz of flies, the distant muezzin drone, the desperation as you crouch uncertain in the dust whilst your men call frantically for orders will lodge in your mind long after you've walked away from the game. [July 2004, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As forgettable as the story mode is, this is a game that should be judged by the pleasure it can bring to a room full of gamers eager for furious arena combat and a splendid variety of team games. And judged by those criteria, it has few peers. [Apr 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chaos Theory is the game that the original Splinter Cell was meant to deliver: a tight play experience within a trusty framework, one more of enjoyment than irritation, and a game that’s no longer exclusively for fans of repeated reloading. [Apr 2005, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chaos Theory is the game that the original Splinter Cell was meant to deliver: a tight play experience within a trusty framework, one more of enjoyment than irritation, and a game that’s no longer exclusively for fans of repeated reloading. [Apr 2005, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For console owners used to having to fiddle with power sliders in order to orchestrate their shots, it brings a nigh-on edible element of tangibility to the experience... An accomplished bundle. [May 2004, p.109]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As the standard bearer for mech-building and fighting, Armoured Core's depth is still as profound... The greater emphasis on overheat and a new tuning system will be to the taste of some veterans and not others, but the beauty of the machines will please all. [June 2004, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a strange situation for the series to truly hit its stride in a game that’s both beginning and conclusion, and you can’t help but wish Dante would never grow up, that there could have been more stories of his teenage roundhouse kicks. [Apr 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In opposition to its marketing pitch, then, it's perhaps best to view FEAR less as a horror show punctuated by action than a blistering action spectacle that likes to play games with its guests. [Dec 2005, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s almost shocking how seamless, engrossing and accessible Fahrenheit is. It’s sad, then, that it shows weakness in the one area where it needed to be stronger than any other game: the script. [Oct 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s almost shocking how seamless, engrossing and accessible Fahrenheit is. It’s sad, then, that it shows weakness in the one area where it needed to be stronger than any other game: the script. [Oct 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Criterion’s ability to make the technology and design of games seem harmonious is a significant strength in an industry where few can pull it off... Black is a fiery example of what can result. [Mar 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While a misplaced desire for innovation once pushed it off course, the series has found its way home. Though it may never learn consistency, it’s remembered how to keep even the most jaded gamer beguiled. [May 2005, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s scope to build everything from a two-hour co-op dungeon crawl to a 100-hour purple-prosed epic. It’s that breadth that makes NN2 as much of an essential purchase as genre fans could ask for. [Christmas 2006, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s debatable whether Oblivion is a great adventure, but it’s certainly one of the broadest around and one that’s a willing canvas for a variety of approaches from its players. [May 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It isn’t any kind of reinvention, but a revitalisation, with a style so rich that it becomes an integral part of the game’s substance; Psychonauts breathes imagination and individuality as effortlessly as most games steal from one another. [July 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It isn’t any kind of reinvention, but a revitalisation, with a style so rich that it becomes an integral part of the game’s substance; Psychonauts breathes imagination and individuality as effortlessly as most games steal from one another. [July 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This dazzling, determinedly populist experience was not made according to the standards other games are made by, and when judged – or even just described – by those standards, it might seem slender to the point of frailty. [Christmas 2005, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This dazzling, determinedly populist experience was not made according to the standards other games are made by, and when judged – or even just described – by those standards, it might seem slender to the point of frailty. [Christmas 2005, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mario 64 DS is a magnificent execution of entirely the wrong content. Happily, despite its age, that content is so robust and remarkable that the result is still surprising, spectacular and, yes, downright Super. [Jan 2005, p.78]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The presentation is as characterful as you would expect from London Studio, it's welcoming to newcomers to the EyeToy, or even to gaming in general, and the navigation system has been much improved, responding snappily to your commands.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a superior control system and a raft of incisive upgrades, this year’s update is a connoisseur of the boxing arts. [Apr 2005, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It certainly lacks the variety and sense of progress that great platform games can offer. But then it was never supposed to be a great platform game. It was supposed to be, and is, a great DS game. [Apr 2005, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may be formulaic, but that formula is still one of invention, surprise and excellence. [Jan 2005, p.87; JPN Import]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Racers has an appealing lack of pretension that suggests it has nothing to prove other than that Ridge Racer is a delight to play. And it is, with no call for caveat – for a handheld, for a ‘remake’, for a launch title. It's simply one of the best pure arcade racers to date. [JPN Import; Feb 2005, p.68]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s not much that can be said about Shadow Of The Colossus. Not because there aren’t pages to be written about the designs of the colossi, the wisdom of some of the puzzles involved in defeating them, or the deliberately ambiguous implications of the story, but because this is a game with so little content that to discuss specifics would be to tarnish an experience that needs to be approached with as few preconceptions as possible. [Christmas 2005, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Minor lapses in cohesion and polish drop Lumines short of the absolute completeness of "Rez," but it expands upon its concepts in ways even Mizuguchi followers couldn't have expected. It's a block puzzle that celebrates the joy of light and sound – to the question of whether the PSP can encourage new experiences, it's a resounding 'yes'.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mercury exhibits a perfect hierarchy of challenge and reward... The pain becomes the pleasure because, in spite of the extraordinary degree of trial and error (practically requiring a degree in the subject), there’s never any moment that feels broken or exploitative. [June 2005, p.91]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    To call this style over substance would be grossly inaccurate. The substance is all there – weighty, deep and stretching off 90 hours into the distance. But, unmistakable, it is substance from another time. [Jan 2005, p.78]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's no question that Wipeout Pure is a very fine Wipeout game and, thanks to its lively, dynamic soundscape and its distinct, exhilarating handling, it deserves three out of three just as much as a score out of ten.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is an incredible achievement, the closest a simulator has come to entertainment; the nearest videogaming has come to the real experience of driving. Forget play. Just drive. [March 2005, p.84]
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ultimately, Makai Kingdom feels more about brutal stat farming than true tactics… Makai Kingdom’s key strategy isn’t so much tactics as just sheer weight of numbers, of accumulation and refinement of properties. [Oct 2005, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The surprise that Meteos brings is the satisfaction of its physics. There’s real weight in the way an underpowered meteor chunk sinks down to earth, and a sense of dynamic propulsion as you flick together a cluster of gravity-defying rockets. [May 2005, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Race Driver 3 understands that a processional win from pole is less fulfilling than a hard-fought, championship-saving fifth place from the back of the grid. And though it can’t exactly engineer those situations, it does everything in its power to make them more likely and leave them unpunished. [Mar 2006, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Race Driver 3 understands that a processional win from pole is less fulfilling than a hard-fought, championship-saving fifth place from the back of the grid. And though it can’t exactly engineer those situations, it does everything in its power to make them more likely and leave them unpunished. [Mar 2006, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You need a decent stick (or a god among pads) to facilitate the split-second Just Impacts, Ukemis and sidesteps that consistent victory demands. This, more than the abundant content is the game's defining improvement - one to snap you out of the sleepwalk by which most Namco fighters are conquered in singleplayer. [Christmas 2005, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It takes more than caffeine, luck and a nosebleed to truly become master of these streets, and this is Revenge’s greatest achievement over its predecessor. The eight locations, split as usual into varied circuits, are arcade racing dreams given form. [Nov 2005, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some may argue over what the series should have become, but what’s important is that it has made that tough decision for itself, and established a rock solid foundation for inevitable, now justified successors. [May 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some may argue over what the series should have become, but what’s important is that it has made that tough decision for itself, and established a rock solid foundation for inevitable, now justified successors. [May 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This stands as software that will give back to the user as much as they are willing to put in. Without goals, with nothing there to ‘win’, Electroplankton is its own reward. [June 2005, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Brimming with self-assuredness both in its characterisations and its functionality, and measures its pace and progression with an ever more aggressively beautiful interface and environment design, capturing even more galactic and universal scale than the original. [Sept 2005, p.88]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While most shooters handle the genre's design tradition like fragile cargo, careful to ensure that its arrangement of pieces doesn't fall into disarray, Prey cranks it like a Rubik's cube, cocking its world delightfully askew. [Sept 2006, p.76]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Feeling the buzz of Genji’s countering system is the key to enjoying it, making the eastern promise of demanding play feel attainable, if less exotic for those already well-versed in mastering such endeavours. [Sept 2005, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s utterly relentless in its provision of new activities and distractions to the point that it’s hard not to become absorbed, a feeling backed up by the fact that most plot missions introduce a new location or interior environment to revisit and explore. [Dec 2006, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s difficult to shake the sensation that Killer 7 is an important production, as paving for future creative leeway if nothing else. But its likely love/hate status is testament to just how adamant it has attempted to be in its flair for extraordinary presentation. [Aug 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Big Huge Games has dressed the RTS in its finest coat-tails, sent it on the most captivating of journeys and transformed its communication skills. There's no question it has become a creature with broader horizons and more refined taste, but there's also no question it's still a familiar figure. [June 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its multiplayer component is far better suited to the game’s design potential than a singleplayer campaign that’s more the frontline rookie, dazzled and dazed by blast upon blast upon blast. [May 2006, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    No other combat game has maps this lavish, or ambitiously designed. [Nov 2007, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s debatable whether Oblivion is a great adventure, but it’s certainly one of the broadest around and one that’s a willing canvas for a variety of approaches from its players. [May 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s all here: the hoi polloi, the ambience, the weather, the police pressure, and the emergent scenarios that can make you feel special or wretched. It feels familiar, but remains primed for fresh exploration and mischief, reapplying a formula that still feels superior to its imitators’ approaches. [Christmas 2005, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Irrespective of talent, taste, spare time or even online connectivity, it has something for anyone with even a tingle in their trigger finger. [Jan 2008, p.78]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Earned In Blood might not seem like a radical departure from the original but the gloriously cascading AI and open maps have effectively transformed it into a very special WWII experience. The fact that there's nothing quite like it in such a crowded genre speaks volumes. [Dec 2005, p.103]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thank heavens, then, for the brilliant Survival mode. Of all Dual Strike’s little reinventions it’s the only one to twist the template into a persuasive new shape. [Sept 2005, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite its unreserved nature, and being about as tightly tethered to reality as the Burnout series, Ridge Racer 6 hasn’t floated away from its roots. It’s content to sink into its well-established furrow of soaring slides and skids, and it still feels crisply satisfying with it. [Jan 2005, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    But for all the excellence on show, there's no shaking the sense that this is a game that does everything that was asked of it, but nothing more. [Christmas 2006, p.72]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This game's focus is its singleplayer campaign, and it's an involving, dynamic, astonishing-looking 12-15 hour bloodbath. A good, old-fashioned bloodbath. [Dec 2005, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s still a hardcore sim at heart – forgiving lower difficulties, sexy day/night effects and emotive cars aside – and those that rush in may miss the point. But explore and savour each passionately sculpted track and car, either solo or in the 16-player online mode, and there are few games to touch it. [Nov 2005, p.111]
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You’ll discover whether you’re a screamer or a yeller, a wide-striding groover or a bolt-upright pogo-er. This is a game that you can play sitting down, but you won’t. Not once. [Christmas 2005, p.104]
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Instantly familiar, and instantly entertaining, Nintendo could hardly have picked a better title for its wi-fi debut. [Christmas 2005, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Developer PAM has reinvented a game that no longer strives to be a thinking man’s alternative to Virtua, but something altogether superior. [May 2006, p.94]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While most shooters handle the genre's design tradition like fragile cargo, careful to ensure that its arrangement of pieces doesn't fall into disarray, Prey cranks it like a Rubik's cube, cocking its world delightfully askew. [Sept 2006, p.76]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the familiarity, the longer you spend in your scaled-down village, the more you’re soothed into a gentle, constructive daydream which is every bit as charming as in all its other incarnations. [Jan 2005, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though the Clancy series entirely consists of such well-rounded packages, it’s Splinter Cell that shines – a game of equally accomplished halves. [Dec 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Plagued by imbalance, the Round 3 career can serve up over 50 bouts before one goes the distance. The new stun punch – a thunderclap of a haymaker – helps to ensure first to third round knockouts for the vast majority of fights. [Apr 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Plagued by imbalance, the Round 3 career can serve up over 50 bouts before one goes the distance. The new stun punch – a thunderclap of a haymaker – helps to ensure first to third round knockouts for the vast majority of fights. [Apr 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Plagued by imbalance, the Round 3 career can serve up over 50 bouts before one goes the distance. The new stun punch – a thunderclap of a haymaker – helps to ensure first to third round knockouts for the vast majority of fights. [Apr 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s hard to find reasons not to point to Exit as a prime piece of PSP gaming. It’s rich colours and bold stylings bring out the best in the machine’s screen; the short, compelling levels are perfect for playing in bite-sized chunks, and wi-fi connectivity means new levels – of which Taito has already made a good few available - will sustain your enthusiasm longterm. [Fe 2006, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some may argue over what the series should have become, but what’s important is that it has made that tough decision for itself, and established a rock solid foundation for inevitable, now justified successors. [May 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Only a supreme apologist could suggest that such performance dips aren’t as damaging as they are disappointing, but conversely a realist should soon become capable of accepting them, momentary as they are. [Apr 2006, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eden has composed a beguiling, intoxicating hymn to the open road, and every car lover will want to join its chorus. [Oct 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Aside from a very few niggling discrepancies, it’s an almost flawless experience – one which, having demanded a heavy investment of both time and thought, richly pays off. [Christmas 2006, p.83]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The fact that it’s just mental arithmetic simply doesn’t matter: all it makes you realise is that most games are mental arithmetic one way or another. [May 2006, p.95]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For some, Yakuza will feel dangerously dumb, due to its unrefined and relentless combat, but it's just as dangerous to risk overlooking its capacity to be fiercely capable and loveably playful in plenty of other ways, always aiming to provide captivating entertainment. [Oct 2006, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The singleplayer adventure is yet another sprawling, puzzle-heavy artefact hunt which, truth be told, is far bigger than we had any right to expect. [May 2006, p.89]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In a family whose every member shouts from the rooftops, it risks palling into the background. Set it on its own, though – or besides absolutely any other 2D platformer – and it shines with dazzling kaleidoscopic brightness. [July 2006, p.78]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    BF2142 fails to stimulate to the same levels as previous titles in the series, all of which have benefited from a more solid grounding in real-world settings and situations. [Dec 2006, p.87]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Half-Life’s narrative does nothing altogether new, and nothing to upturn the quite reasonable condescension of Roger Ebert and his peers in more mature media. But in an interactive genre bound to the traditions of the pop-up gun and invisible hero, it simply doesn’t get more sophisticated than this. [Aug 2006, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This new outing for Sega’s ever-appealing sports series is a deeper, more serious and demanding beast than before, yet happily manages to retain the series’ lighthearted atmosphere and is, on occasion, utterly bonkers. [Apr 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thematically eccentric, mechanically shambolic and technically stunning, Dead Rising is the kind of infectious experience that yearns for a sequel. [Oct 2006, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It demands persistence on the part of the player to uncover its inner workings, but when you do start to move in tandem, it's an undeniably exhilaratnig dance. [Oct 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine