Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 2,808 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 15% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 82% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Bayonetta 2
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
2808 game reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Minor gripes aside, Rock Band with four players in the same room is quite something to be a part of, a game not only an evolution of the genre but of the social side of gaming itself. [Jan 2008, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Huge in scope and strong on detail, IX has ironed out the kinks that have made the series less palatable outside Japan, and with Nintendo's support, IX is sure to have the wider impact that the series has craved. [Aug 2010, p.92]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Games have mastered action – the amplified and instant reward – but Papers, Please finds satisfaction in the tedium of bureaucracy, and twins it with genuinely human stories and an underlying, dread-filled tension. It’s rare to play a game about something, about a time, a place and a theme, and for a game to embody those ideas from meaning right down to mechanics.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    No other GTA has felt so trim and robust while making good the promise of a living, breathing action world. [May 2009, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The present console cycle is expected to last nearly a decade, and there will inevitably be developers advocating the need for more sophisticated tools. But just like Machu Picchu, the Pyramids and every other engineering marvel of antiquity, Uncharted 3 will stand as a reminder to future generations of gamers that enough problem-solving imagination can turn any old trowel into a magic wand.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    By polishing away blemishes, Rock Band 2 carefully improves on its predecessor. Those expecting the likes of music-making functionality perhaps aren’t quite on Rock Band’s wavelength, which is about performance, not creativity. [Dec 2008, p.85]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Games are so rarely funny by design, but Jazzpunk is much more than a funny videogame. It’s a comedy, and one that wouldn’t be possible – or anywhere near as powerful – in any other medium.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Ultimately, no one will disagree that Uncharted 2 is one hell of a ride, and the best PS3 action game to date.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An emphatic, feature-packed and sometimes stunning final act.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    TxK
    This is twitch gaming at its finest, with beautifully tuned thumbstick controls and a pulsing rave soundtrack that only seems to focus the mind more sharply.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    PGR3 hasn’t moved from its niche, not at all – at its core, it’s still pure PGR, a savvy and standalone mixture of real form and hyper-real function – but it’s been transformed into a wondrous and rewarding beauty spot. [Christmas 2005, p.88]
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It may be pulled together from no more than shards of light, but few games manage to be both a science and an art. [Oct 2008, p.99]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's unusual to find a game of this sort deal with losing, which is obviously the majority experience, with such care – the packaging of Barry's mad dash turns it into an endlessly rewarding marathon, rather than a series of disconnected sprints.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Gauge, then, is throwaway, minimalist, score-chasing brilliance, a game that's pulled together from the smallest selection of pieces, but that also feels bold and new and intensely imaginative.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Despite its hectic invention, then, Velocity retains a rare kind of focus. Vita owners finally have something tart to see them through the drought, and the Minis just got a new standard bearer.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a brave and truly original work, and if this is what happens when Simogo explores its dark side, it should do so more often.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may not re-invent the wheel, but MotoGP2 is a shiny new alloy among racing games, and builds upon the series' excellent reputation. And that should be enough to stir up Xbox live all over again. [June 2003, p.100]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Combat is thrilling – each weapon packing a solid, vicious blast; movement suggesting heft and momentum. [Dec 2008, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Brutal and rather short, VVVVVV's also devious and darkly funny. It's a pedantic classic, and a game for watch-makers as much as speed-runners.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a masterfully constructed piece of tabletop theatre, whose spell is only broken once, as we were delayed for over an hour by some key loot that took over a dozen attempts to drop. Many won't make it past this preposterous roadblock, but those who persevere to the bitter end will be heartily glad they did.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Combat is thrilling – each weapon packing a solid, vicious blast; movement suggesting heft and momentum. [Dec 2008, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If Rocket League often feels like a sports game for people who don't really like sports games, that's no criticism. [Oct 2015, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dead Rising 3 is a sandbox in the purest sense, one that urges you to experiment with its innumerable toys at your leisure. The result is an open world that, in spite of its reanimated inhabitants, feels more alive than most.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a strange situation for the series to truly hit its stride in a game that’s both beginning and conclusion, and you can’t help but wish Dante would never grow up, that there could have been more stories of his teenage roundhouse kicks. [Apr 2005, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite its unreserved nature, and being about as tightly tethered to reality as the Burnout series, Ridge Racer 6 hasn’t floated away from its roots. It’s content to sink into its well-established furrow of soaring slides and skids, and it still feels crisply satisfying with it. [Jan 2005, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The presentation is as characterful as you would expect from London Studio, it's welcoming to newcomers to the EyeToy, or even to gaming in general, and the navigation system has been much improved, responding snappily to your commands.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bright, colourful and mostly dismissive of current trends, it’s clear The Behemoth wants to delight players with every moment of its latest performance. That it succeeds in only most of those moments is still a remarkable achievement.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Showdown is not just a party game, nor is it the limp refurb you might expect this late in a console life cycle. It feels like something as crucial to Codemasters Racing as any of its predecessors – less a spin-off than a deliberate change of tack.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whatever the oddities and missed opportunities of its singleplayer mode, Bad Company 2 delivers a fulsome online game that continues to hone a winning formula. [Apr 2010, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    So while the campaign's filled with visual pleasures and colourful tricks, it's in the stark white spaces of the editor that Sound Shapes really dazzles, stepping away from the museum of hallucinations that all rhythm action games offer and threatening, at times, to become a genuine musical instrument in its own right.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The game's parts are by turns novel and enjoyable, but when played in longer bursts feel repetitive. Brotherhood is Assassin's Creed II 2, its new mechanics feeling more like extensions of an existing form than innovations. It's a greatest hits disc, then, a weighty, good-value deal that plays the series' best bits – but there's the constant danger that you've heard them before.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a delightfully risky experiment, and the end result is pure alchemy: the blending of two fiercely traditional genres into something both unique and entirely natural. [Apr 2009, p.125]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It would be easy to take The Minish Cap for granted, left as it is with little to do but shuffle and tinker with its immaculate heritage. That, however, would be a grave mistake... Maybe you can't go wrong with the Zelda template, but they haven't always gone this right. [Christmas 2004, p.91]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a defined beginning, four distinct seasonal environments and an affecting, surprising conclusion, there's no question that Proteus is a game. But if there's one concern, it's whether this is an island that's worth revisiting once you've seen all it has to offer. In a way, its lack of progression – the absence of skill trees, difficulty levels and save points – works in its favour; you won't dive back in to mop up the last few achievements, or to climb leaderboards, but simply because you want to play Proteus.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a third and final chapter, then, with all that implies. It's off-putting to new players, too busy tying up loose ends to dangle any threads of its own, and fails to stand up as its own game in the same manner as its predecessors. But it's also a spectacular, powerfully imagined and dramatically involving final act to one of gaming's richest sci-fi sagas.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It homes in, with a clockmaker's precision and a playful gleam in its eye, on what Mario does best.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some may argue over what the series should have become, but what’s important is that it has made that tough decision for itself, and established a rock solid foundation for inevitable, now justified successors. [May 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whatever you conclude about the bigger picture, this is special stuff. The claustrophobic buzz of flies, the distant muezzin drone, the desperation as you crouch uncertain in the dust whilst your men call frantically for orders will lodge in your mind long after you've walked away from the game. [July 2004, p.98]
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Schlocky and silly in places, but potent and reflective in others, Nilin’s tale has bags of heart to play off against its flamboyant bosses and existential quandaries, all grounded by a charismatic female star. While the world building isn’t on a par with the best – hampered by a civilian population as robotic as its metal cohorts – a rich backstory and architectural detail make Neo-Paris a place worth visiting.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sonic And Sega All-Stars Racing is the most fun karting game on iOS, and an update taking care of those online hiccups can only make it more essential.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Far Cry 3's main missions are nothing special in and of themselves, and include one or two exhausting slogs and limp stealth sections, but the campaign does a better job than Far Cry 2's storyline when it comes to providing an alternative to the open emergence of the player-authored escapades.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s resplendent with detail and vibrancy: each of WHD’s eight tracks is a shimmering, 1080p rhapsody, played at an unwavering 60fps. [Dec 2008, p.93]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its nonsensical charm – cartoon aliens, sweeties that make planets, and a robot T-Rex – as well as a winning extra mode (which basically makes planets into timebombs) after completion rounds off an original and deep hybrid.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a game of corners, conditions and the times in which you master them, DIRT is an outstanding engine of online competition, powered by an outstanding engine of sight, sound and physics. [July 2007, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chaos Theory is the game that the original Splinter Cell was meant to deliver: a tight play experience within a trusty framework, one more of enjoyment than irritation, and a game that’s no longer exclusively for fans of repeated reloading. [Apr 2005, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This lightness of touch, combined with instant restarts and a Trials-style checkpoint system, makes for an extremely moreish racer. [June 2016, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Zero mission is … old, but it's also tantalisingly new, coupled with a tightening of the mythos and franchise in anticipation of follow-ups to "Prime" and "Fusion." It works. [Apr 2004, p.107]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For those of us with purer nail-hitting, dog-poking and badger-stomping in mind, the pleasure will have to remain in the doing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    DaWindci's a sedate, slow burning thrill.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Is it better than Flick Kick Football? It lacks the purity of Pik Pok's original, and isn't nearly so charming. But where Flick Kick lapses into formula after you reach a high enough score, Flick Soccer gets even more challenging – and in full flow, it can provide a magical experience.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Throw in a typically generous range of levels and a surprisingly engrossing hidden object game, and Snapshot becomes a recipe for a candy-coloured afternoon of elegant brainteasers.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bar a handful of bosses, Dark Dawn is a pushover, never requiring you to brave the combat's depths. Yes, it grants breathing room for testing unlikely combinations, but we'd have liked to put our mastery to the test. [Jan 2011, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s refreshingly exacting about timing, though too forgiving when it comes to grading – you can miss several prompts, take plenty of damage and still earn gold.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Warp tends to the lightweight - almost a confection - but as with anything that offers this sort of energetic sugary high, sometimes it's good to be left wanting more.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    From its overpowered weapons and gormless AI to its pedestrian objecctives, the singleplayer game is as dumb as it is misguided – an embarrassment to the rather splendid mulitplayer game that, fortunately, represents all that's really important. [Dec 2005, p.101]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's no question that Wipeout Pure is a very fine Wipeout game and, thanks to its lively, dynamic soundscape and its distinct, exhilarating handling, it deserves three out of three just as much as a score out of ten.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Most of all, BioShock 2 has one quality that makes us much more hopeful for the future of the series and its inevitable onward growth as one of gaming’s big franchises: it shows the capacity of Rapture to utterly change itself for the telling of a new tale, while somehow remaining the same.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It takes more than caffeine, luck and a nosebleed to truly become master of these streets, and this is Revenge’s greatest achievement over its predecessor. The eight locations, split as usual into varied circuits, are arcade racing dreams given form. [Nov 2005, p.98]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The series' daily challenges return, and the team's flair for simple, yet interesting, map design remains undiminished. Refinement's never quite as exciting as reinvention, of course, but with so little to fix, Rodeo's clearly spent its development time rather wisely.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ronimo has made an ingenious Trojan horse by delivering the structure and systems of a cult PC genre on consoles, wrapped in the glamour of classic console gaming. Rather than alienate the wrong audience, Awesomenauts could – and should – make plenty of converts to its cause.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At its core, though, is Hydro Thunder Hurricane's handling model. Swerving between subtlety and throttle every few seconds, it graces tracks that provide both competitive dashes and full-on fairground rides. All this is wrapped up in a perpetually rewarding structure that keeps these precious elements fresh, making up a comeback that holds its first principles close.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s difficult to be too nitpicky about one of the most flat-out entertaining games of recent times. Overkill resurrects an old franchise as anything but a shambling corpse, and raises the bar for third party production values on this generation’s best-selling console. [Mar 2009, p.89]
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    iBlast Moki 2, with its slightly bland charm, unremarkable origins and questionable English, isn't going to be the next Angry Birds. But while playing, you occasionally think it should be.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    DMC4 is not the grotesque misstep it so easily could have been. DMC4 is hardcore. [Mar 2008, p.90]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It isn’t any kind of reinvention, but a revitalisation, with a style so rich that it becomes an integral part of the game’s substance; Psychonauts breathes imagination and individuality as effortlessly as most games steal from one another. [July 2005, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's still a Soul Calibur game, but Project Soul has successfully designed it for a wider audience of casual and hardcore players alike, which was a key factor in Capcom's successful reinvention of its revered series. [Feb 2012, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It demands persistence on the part of the player to uncover its inner workings, but when you do start to move in tandem, it's an undeniably exhilaratnig dance. [Oct 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Journey's real issue, if it has one, goes much deeper than that. It's a resolutely linear game in which your range of interactions is minimal. For some, that will make it a pretty but hollow novelty; boring, perhaps. But for those who play games to explore strange lands, see beautiful sights and to immerse themselves – for however brief a time – in a new world, Journey is perfect. And what's more, they'll find someone like them to share it with.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although the basic joy of rolling realistic water around might be short-lived, it's bolstered by the far greater satisfaction of solving the game's intuitive, well-paced puzzles. [Jan 2011, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's clever without being intimidating, delicate without being volatile, and immediate without a sense of panic. [Feb 2011, p.99]
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This new outing for Sega’s ever-appealing sports series is a deeper, more serious and demanding beast than before, yet happily manages to retain the series’ lighthearted atmosphere and is, on occasion, utterly bonkers. [Apr 2007, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The improvements are so varied, polished and deep to make any devotee of the game consider upgrading. In fact, its range is extensive enough to make those who turned their nose up at the business-as-usual nature of UT2003 come storming back. [May 2004, p.98]
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Has enough in that expertly-pitched control system to keep you replaying the same courses over and over, relaxing into a groove before smashing through the score barrier on one perfect run. It's an iPhone game you'll come back to for the controls alone – and that's not something you can't say every day.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    MotoGP may only bring a handful of new bikes and tracks, but it’s still a handsome package. [July 2006, p.82]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fraught, oppressive and tense, Thumper has been built to a singular vision - and one we can certainly respect, if not always enjoy. [Christmas 2016, p.117]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is an incredible achievement, the closest a simulator has come to entertainment; the nearest videogaming has come to the real experience of driving. Forget play. Just drive. [March 2005, p.84]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a vehicle that may win over more action fans than true-bloods, but its plagiaristic tendencies represent a shrewd way of ensuring that the series gets a firm footing outside of the 2D realm. [Nov 2010, p.84]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Quarrel DX is the funniest and most stylish word game around, with layers of strategy that go down so deep it sometimes feels you're just scratching the surface. Even without multiplayer this is an essential purchase. With multiplayer, it could take over the world – or, at the very least, be the thinking person's Angry Birds.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The stuff of legend, then? Indeed. Although, perhaps fittingly, one with nothing new to say. [Apr 2010, p.88]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unlike the creature at its centre, Isolation isn't structurally perfect, but it is brilliantly hostile in a way that's likely to shock many players. [Dec 2014, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What is most amazing of all is that despite its litany of weird little problems, Destiny is fantastic, its combat up there with the very best, the thrilling rhythm of its battles still not fading the 30th time through, and it has no single systemic problem that is not fixable. [Dec 2014, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whereas a more comprehensive reimagining of how Okami would work on DS could have resulted in a less ambitious, more polished game, Okamiden succeeds in preserving both the spirit and form of its forebear, and that makes in rather special indeed. [Mar 2011, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even if some of the fundamental stuff has been sacrificed to the creation of this huge world, Fuel still makes it across the finish line on a far-from-empty tank. [July 2009, p.97]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is the best entry in its genre since Bayonetta, and might just be the best game Ninja Theory has made to date.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where next for Pokemon? Black and White don't suggest any answers, but they do remind us why we'd care in the first place. [Mar 2011, p.103]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite these minor imperfections F-Zero GX has it where it counts. The combination of blistering speed, responsive controls and rivals with genuine personality makes this one of the most addictive games of the year. [Oct 2003, p.96]
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where next for Pokemon? Black and White don't suggest any answers, but they do remind us why we'd care in the first place. [Mar 2011, p.103]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like "GTA" there's more to this than shock and awe. Within its linear structure there is a lot of freedom within which to act, much more so than both "Splinter Cell" and "Metal Gear Solid 2," the titles which Manhunt most closely resembles. [Jan 2004, p.96]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A colourfully written and often funny game, but one that doesn't deviate much from the fantasy rulebook, an area where a more substantial break from the past would have been welcome. [Sept 2014, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a clutch of intricate puzzle stages and some tough daily challenges for players chasing mastery, Ookibloks challenges mind and thumbs in equal measure.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Through judicious pruning and reweaving Naughty Dog has crafted one of the finest action adventures to date. It’s involving in its narrative, a triumph of pacing, and simply a pleasure to play. [Christmas 2007, p.80]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Not since Yoshi's Island's designers broke out the crayons has a Nintendo platformer looked so much like a work of craft, but it's a pity that, for the most part, the levels don't feel as fresh as they look - a platform made of butterfly stitching is still just a platform. [Christmas 2010, p.93]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A love letter to the NES era, Shovel Knight is punishingly difficult, a game of quick reflexes and exacting precision. [Sept 2014, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Intelligent Systems takes great care to shape its RPG for portable play. The world is divided into Super Mario Bros-style levels that each pack a tidy little narrative. Levelling is removed in order to keep these vignettes grind-free. And it's all wrapped up in Nintendo's typically hilarious localisation.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There's a whiff of trial and error at times, but no puzzle's Eureka moment comes by accident. [Sept 2014, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Level-5 and Studio Ghibli's contributions are harmonious. As a game, Ni No Kuni builds upon classic JRPG foundations, eschewing the evolutions of Xenoblade Chronicles and Final Fantasy XII. But the assured flair with which Level-5 has implemented each of the game's classic components combines with Ghibli's masterful storytelling to deliver a JRPG that's quite unlike any other.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s hard to find reasons not to point to Exit as a prime piece of PSP gaming. It’s rich colours and bold stylings bring out the best in the machine’s screen; the short, compelling levels are perfect for playing in bite-sized chunks, and wi-fi connectivity means new levels – of which Taito has already made a good few available - will sustain your enthusiasm longterm. [Fe 2006, p.90]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This sequel isn't the leap forward the concept deserves, but it's a testament to the original that it remains a standout personality over two years on, at a point when quality platform games have become thin on the ground. [Mar 2011, p.99]
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The overall impression Guitar Hero II leaves, particularly in light of its multiformat future and MTV's investment in Harmonix, is that it’s ceased to be a stand-alone game, and is now a platform in its own right. [Christmas 2006, p.86]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's clear that Disney's ideas are far from drying up.